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    (Original post by YouHaveProblems)
    what?
    Phone flipped out and posted before I was done.
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    (Original post by Fleuves)
    Even less medical schools accept resitters than those who offer GEM courses.
    If you make the minimum grades, but receive no offers, I agree. Gap year and re-application is best.
    But if you miss the grades, you're between a rock and a hard place. You can chance a resit and apply to the places that accept resitters. Or you can do a BSc with the view to do grad Medicine.
    Grad medicine is designed to be affordable. You pay roughly 15k in total towards the tuition fees yourself (3-4kish x4), NHS fund the rest and SFE will provide the living cost loans. Not many people have 3-4k per year to hand, but so long as you have a good credit score, many banks will loan privately to grad medics because you are guaranteed a high-income job by the end of it.
    this is interesting! i didn't know the cost breakdown of grad medicine
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    (Original post by jaysinn)
    this is interesting! i didn't know the cost breakdown of grad medicine
    I missed an offer and I'm re-applying this year as a resitter. If I get offers they will want an A* in Chemistry. I'm anxious about not meeting that. So I have applied for 2 BScs. All I want to do is Medicine. I can't conceive any other career. I'm 24, my mind is made up. If I don't get in this year I don't have time to lose. GEM is my next goal if I don't get into undergraduate. I have read around this more than I'm happy to admit :-) lol
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    (Original post by Fleuves)
    I missed an offer and I'm re-applying this year as a resitter. If I get offers they will want an A* in Chemistry. I'm anxious about not meeting that. So I have applied for 2 BScs. All I want to do is Medicine. I can't conceive any other career. I'm 24, my mind is made up. If I don't get in this year I don't have time to lose. GEM is my next goal if I don't get into undergraduate. I have read around this more than I'm happy to admit :-) lol
    its alright! as least you have a very strong and clear goal in your mind. have you ever though about applying for medicine internationally? which BScs have you applied for? i applied to neuroscience cos its sounds incredibly interesting and we don't have this course where im from. highly doubt ill fly over to study it though i wish you all the best!!
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    (Original post by jaysinn)
    its alright! as least you have a very strong and clear goal in your mind. have you ever though about applying for medicine internationally? which BScs have you applied for? i applied to neuroscience cos its sounds incredibly interesting and we don't have this course where im from. highly doubt ill fly over to study it though i wish you all the best!!
    I would if I were single. Alas I am betrothed to a fantastic supportive SO who is a trainee surgeon so he can't just up and leave with me. I choose love! Makes things even trickier ha ha
    Oof, even harder when you're an int. applying for UK Med. I admire your dreams, don't give up. Where do you live? Neuroscience at KCL is supposedly brilliant, I know some grad med students who have done it. It will open others doors too, academia/research for example, or an Allied Health Profession like SLT if you really want to work with people.
    I have applied for Applied Medical Sciences at UCL and Anatomy and Human Biology at Liverpool :-)
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    (Original post by jaysinn)
    i think its wrong to generalize and assume that anyone who is willing to study biomed is not passionate enough for medicine. biomedicine is a branch of medical science and there are people out there willing to serve society through this branch of medicine as well if they aren't able to secure a spot in medicine. these people aren't simply devoted to medicine. they are devoted to helping society and there's more than one route to that.

    i suppose my words came off wrongly. resits will place an additional, unexpected burden on the family (in my country the full cost come up to thousands i believe), whereas university was something that was expected and in a sense, prepared for. and if these people are passionate about serving, and they don't happen to get into medicine on the first try, biomed seems like a good alternative to serve and also happens to be more cost effective.

    medicine is an immense dream and yet there are people out there with practical problems. i believe that one can be incredibly passionate for medicine but is also willing to settle for something less if it comes to that. obviously, it would be a tough and heartbreaking decision but there is also no guarantee that you will definitely get in if you take a gap year. and there will be people out there who have to let that dream go.

    sorry for the previous short reply! my computer had to restart for an update so i sent that out first.
    Sure being dedicated to 'helping serve society' is good but universities look for devotion to studying medicine. The devotion to becoming a doctor or etc. that's what they ask you at university. If they ask "why would you want to be a doctor and not a nurse or dentist" you can't say I'm devoted to serving society because the whole point of that question is to discriminate between different ways of helping serve society. And literally every single course falls under the 'helping serve society' category.

    If you are in a country where your exams cost 1000 then the money you will need to come over and study will be loads anyway. Especially as if you are self studying. University being 'expected' or 'prepared' for is silly because there was no guarantee you will even get into university and you must have had to applied with the realistic expectation that perhaps you might not get an offer for any course. It's a logical deduction that people who are fine with a career in biomedicine aren't passionate enough for medicine. The word enough is subjective but what i'm referring to by enough is the standards that universities will look for.

    Biomedicine is also not as cost effective in the long run, because their jobs don't pay as well. Also if you are applying just on the basis of income then that's also where doubts in your dedication come into play.

    i'm not trying to be mean btw.

    (Original post by Fleuves)
    Even less medical schools accept resitters than those who offer GEM courses.
    If you make the minimum grades, but receive no offers, I agree. Gap year and re-application is best.
    But if you miss the grades, you're between a rock and a hard place. You can chance a resit and apply to the places that accept resitters. Or you can do a BSc with the view to do grad Medicine.
    Grad medicine is designed to be affordable. You pay roughly 15k in total towards the tuition fees yourself (3-4kish x4), NHS fund the rest and SFE will provide the living cost loans. Not many people have 3-4k per year to hand, but so long as you have a good credit score, many banks will loan privately to grad medics because you are guaranteed a high-income job by the end of it.
    The fact that less universities accept resits doesn't mean the chances of an offer is decreased. They are going to be applying to four universities anyway so it's not like they can get an offer from all ≈32 medicine universities, they can only get an offer from the 4 they're applying. The resit universities hardly/don't discriminate against resits so the chance of getting an offer is the same, if not greater assuming that you didn't miss the entry requirements by a massive amount. The point you made about GEM wasn't necessary because my point had context behind it to the previous reply about one extra year out of money.
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    Sorry dude, I realised after I posted that quoting you wasn't necessary at all. I was just chipping in my two cents to the general discussion.
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    (Original post by Fleuves)
    I would if I were single. Alas I am betrothed to a fantastic supportive SO who is a trainee surgeon so he can't just up and leave with me. I choose love! Makes things even trickier ha ha
    Oof, even harder when you're an int. applying for UK Med. I admire your dreams, don't give up. Where do you live? Neuroscience at KCL is supposedly brilliant, I know some grad med students who have done it. It will open others doors too, academia/research for example, or an Allied Health Profession like SLT if you really want to work with people.
    I have applied for Applied Medical Sciences at UCL and Anatomy and Human Biology at Liverpool :-)
    Hahaha thats so sweet!
    yes, the chances of me getting in are close to naught but no harm trying anyways! i really love the vibes that KCL gives me (through the internet, that is lol) and i've applied for medicine there. but i applied for neuro in manchester hahahha i applied for a masters there though and it would really be interesting to do a research about neuro but i think ultimately, my heart is with the human interaction!
    anatomy sounds really cool too omg
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    (Original post by YouHaveProblems)
    Sure being dedicated to 'helping serve society' is good but universities look for devotion to studying medicine. The devotion to becoming a doctor or etc. that's what they ask you at university. If they ask "why would you want to be a doctor and not a nurse or dentist" you can't say I'm devoted to serving society because the whole point of that question is to discriminate between different ways of helping serve society. And literally every single course falls under the 'helping serve society' category.

    If you are in a country where your exams cost 1000 then the money you will need to come over and study will be loads anyway. Especially as if you are self studying. University being 'expected' or 'prepared' for is silly because there was no guarantee you will even get into university and you must have had to applied with the realistic expectation that perhaps you might not get an offer for any course. It's a logical deduction that people who are fine with a career in biomedicine aren't passionate enough for medicine. The word enough is subjective but what i'm referring to by enough is the standards that universities will look for.

    Biomedicine is also not as cost effective in the long run, because their jobs don't pay as well. Also if you are applying just on the basis of income then that's also where doubts in your dedication come into play.

    i'm not trying to be mean btw.
    hahaha no, i dont think you're mean!! i just think its quite interesting to hear from different perspectives because truthfully, i've personally never thought about "being willing to study biomed = not passionate enough for medicine"

    i suppose your first point is true as well, but i would believe that serving society to help directly contribute to the improvement of health and quality of life of society at large does apply as a legitimate reason to pursue a career in both med and biomed.

    regarding the cost of exams, citizens have it largely subsidized if you're taking it in your school. unfortunately, that isn't the case for private candidates (as you will be to resit) and im incredibly privileged to have uk as an option as well and regarding the point about uni being expected... i suppose its a cultural difference? there is an extremely strong notion that university = success in my country and a lot of parents do expect their child to get into university and most people who apply do tend to receive a place. uni is thus "expected" here in this sense.

    cost effective as in put less burden on the family. i wouldn't mind earning less. if i would i wouldn't have applied here knowing the NHS/junior doctors scenario
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    (Original post by jaysinn)
    hahaha no, i dont think you're mean!! i just think its quite interesting to hear from different perspectives because truthfully, i've personally never thought about "being willing to study biomed = not passionate enough for medicine"

    i suppose your first point is true as well, but i would believe that serving society to help directly contribute to the improvement of health and quality of life of society at large does apply as a legitimate reason to pursue a career in both med and biomed.

    regarding the cost of exams, citizens have it largely subsidized if you're taking it in your school. unfortunately, that isn't the case for private candidates (as you will be to resit) and im incredibly privileged to have uk as an option as well and regarding the point about uni being expected... i suppose its a cultural difference? there is an extremely strong notion that university = success in my country and a lot of parents do expect their child to get into university and most people who apply do tend to receive a place. uni is thus "expected" here in this sense.

    cost effective as in put less burden on the family. i wouldn't mind earning less. if i would i wouldn't have applied here knowing the NHS/junior doctors scenario
    So what reason do you have for applying to medicine then? And why not nursing or dentistry or anything along them lines??
    Yeah it is a cultural thing but i really don't like it when people are affected by cultural norms, they(norms) don't make sense one bit.
    Resits aren't that expensive in uk also.
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    (Original post by YouHaveProblems)
    656 is quite alright, just make sure your other academics are great
    Is A*AAA considered great? Or do I need 4 A*s?
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    (Original post by roosindu)
    Is A*AAA considered great? Or do I need 4 A*s?
    A*AAA is great
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    Does anyone know roughly when they let you know about interviews for the postgrad course ?
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    (Original post by Fleuves)
    I missed an offer and I'm re-applying this year as a resitter. If I get offers they will want an A* in Chemistry. I'm anxious about not meeting that. So I have applied for 2 BScs. All I want to do is Medicine. I can't conceive any other career. I'm 24, my mind is made up. If I don't get in this year I don't have time to lose. GEM is my next goal if I don't get into undergraduate. I have read around this more than I'm happy to admit :-) lol
    I 100% feel where you're coming from. I'm 23 so I don't feel I have too much time either lol. Best of luck!!!

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    has anyone still not got a confirmation email?
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    (Original post by AmaduM)
    I 100% feel where you're coming from. I'm 23 so I don't feel I have too much time either lol. Best of luck!!!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Best of luck to you too :-)
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    (Original post by AmaduM)
    I 100% feel where you're coming from. I'm 23 so I don't feel I have too much time either lol. Best of luck!!!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    (Original post by Fleuves)
    Best of luck to you too :-)
    You guys don't worry I was in work experience and the foundation year/junior doctor doctor said they graduated alongside a 52 year old.
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    (Original post by YouHaveProblems)
    You guys don't worry I was in work experience and the foundation year/junior doctor doctor said they graduated alongside a 52 year old.
    Ah, I know it happens. But it gets harder to learn the older you get :-(
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    (Original post by Fleuves)
    Ah, I know it happens. But it gets harder to learn the older you get :-(
    Yeah but it's never too late to learn. Many people graduate at age 40 or so with several degrees. In medicine when we are around 40 ish we will be constantly learning much much harder things than we would have done in university now anyway. You aaaaalllways have to keep learning in medicine
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    (Original post by LightAtTheEnd)
    Well there are 6 medic applicants from my school but so far only I have a biomedical offer but I think the others will most likely get it in the near future.
    Good luck to you regardless, but who knows I might just see you at King's! (If your applying there and prefer it).
    Ohh right, fingers crossed offers start coming through soon! In the end, the biomedicine offer isn't necessary it's just a form of reassurance incase I don't get any Medicine offers if ygm. Good luck to you as well, and yes King's is my top choice applied there for both Medicine and biomedicine, see you there maybe
 
 
 
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