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Mathematics, Economics or Financial Mathematics courses. watch

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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    So are you saying that Maths and econ was better? or is economics sufficient (in a uni with a lot of maths)?
    either is fine, don't think anyone really gives a ****. think ppl overhype the difficulty of these jobs.. in reality if ur not a quant, most ppl could cope on the job with a little time on the desk
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    either is fine, don't think anyone really gives a ****. think ppl overhype the difficulty of these jobs.. in reality if ur not a quant, most ppl could cope on the job with a little time on the desk
    Deffo agree

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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    either is fine, don't think anyone really gives a ****. think ppl overhype the difficulty of these jobs.. in reality if ur not a quant, most ppl could cope on the job with a little time on the desk
    Plenty of uneducated people trade derivatives in prop shops, so you're not saying anything special.

    Surely you don't think people who haven't studied Maths, or an equally quantitative degree at undergrad at least, with equal knowledge regarding derivatives as someone who hasn't studied such a quantitative subject as such a level, would be equal?

    The Mathematician would be superior, simply because of the rigor, problem solving prowess and creative logic embedded in Maths grads (at even mid ranking universities).
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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    Whats a good degree for derivs trading? Economics or maths and economics?
    By the way, don't listen to these guys, choose maths and economics, pure maths or maths with stats/physics/comp sci if you can.

    Unless you want to be a pleb prop trader.
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    By the way, don't listen to these guys, choose maths and economics, pure maths or maths with stats/physics/comp sci if you can.

    Unless you want to be a pleb prop trader.
    Surely an economics degree gives plenty of mathematical background for the job? Princepieman
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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    Surely an economics degree gives plenty of mathematical background for the job?
    If we take that idea to the logical extreme well you don't need a degree to do the job.

    But a Mathematical degree (not an econ degree at undergrad level) gives you a competitive advantage.
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    If we take that idea to the logical extreme well you don't need a degree to do the job.

    But a Mathematical degree (not an econ degree at undergrad level) gives you a competitive advantage.
    Its not exactly extreme, theres a lot of maths in undergraduate economics too. And if it gives more than enough prep for the maths in the job, why is it a problem>
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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    Its not exactly extreme, theres a lot of maths in undergraduate economics too. And if it gives more than enough prep for the maths in the job, why is it a problem>
    Sigh. Do as you a please.

    I repeat: You do not even need a degree to be able to trade derivatives.

    Studying a quantitative course will give you a considerably greater competitive advantage.

    Imperial won't even accept you for an MSc in Financial Mathematics if you've studied econ:

    http://www.imperial.ac.uk/natural-sc...-requirements/

    I think this should give you an idea of what I mean.
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    Sigh. Do as you a please.

    I repeat: You do not even need a degree to be able to trade derivatives.

    Studying a quantitative course will give you a considerably greater competitive advantage.

    Imperial won't even accept you for an MSc in Financial Mathematics if you've studied econ:

    http://www.imperial.ac.uk/natural-sc...-requirements/

    I think this should give you an idea of what I mean.
    You're ignoring my point. Doesnt an economics degree give enough maths for a job in derivatives?
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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    You're ignoring my point. Doesnt an economics degree give enough maths for a job in derivatives?
    Yes it does.
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    (Original post by BarryBeTrippin)
    Yes it does.
    So how does a quant degree give as much of an advantage that you arre saaying it has if an economist has enough mathematical knowledge for the job?
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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    So how does a quant degree give as much of an advantage that you arre saaying it has if an economist has enough mathematical knowledge for the job?
    A college dropout can trade derivatives.

    Any f*ckstick can trade derivatives.

    Basically, having a profound understanding of high-level math and stats, opens up a range of other techniques and insight to use.
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    (Original post by A$aprocky)
    Surely an economics degree gives plenty of mathematical background for the job? Princepieman
    For most roles in derivs trading, yeah. If you want to be a quant, that's a whole other barrel of eggs.

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    (Original post by ramie)
    Hey all,

    Would love a career in banking in the future. Deciding on what course to do at uni is the problem.

    I love both maths and econ, but unsure on what to pick and what would open more doors. I am leaning more towards maths as it seems it would be better suited to trading whilst is the goal.

    The courses i have been looking are:
    LSE - Finance OR Mathematics and Economics
    Warwick - Mathematics and Economic or MORSE
    UCL - Mathematics and Economics

    Back ups

    Surrey - Financial Mathematics
    Queen Mary - Mathematics, Statistics and Financial Economics
    Loughborough - Financial Mathematics

    Is Financial mathematics worth doing? or should straight with straight maths?

    thanks
    Forget maths at LSE.

    To cut a long story short, you should keep your options open and a maths degree at the LSE does not give you the full range of mathematical areas such as pure (algebra, analysis, not the stuff you're doing at school, unless group theory is still within the A-Level syllabus), applied, mathematical physics, numerical, stats and discrete.

    You say you want to go into finance now, possibly as a trader but circumstances change.

    As for studying economics for a career in the city, yes it is possible and possibly the majority of those in the city prob have an econ degree over any other (and you can trade derivs with it, as you can without a degree).

    However, for the more complex products or if you want to be a quant (a proper quant in an ib, not one in asset man), even an undergrad degree in maths is not sufficient.

    You would have to be a postgrad in maths, having studied topics such as measure theory, pdes and stochastic calculus and most quants have phds or are postdocs.
 
 
 
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