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    I'm studying A- level religion A2 and also repeating my AS exam. What would be the best possible way of revising for these?Most people tell me they just memorise the essays but I really struggle with this. Is there any other ways of revising for these exams?
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    (Original post by Sazza3)
    I'm studying A- level religion A2 and also repeating my AS exam. What would be the best possible way of revising for these?Most people tell me they just memorise the essays but I really struggle with this. Is there any other ways of revising for these exams?
    Remember main points for each theory and concept and learn some examples
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    Is this AQA?

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    (Original post by Sazza3)
    I'm studying A- level religion A2 and also repeating my AS exam. What would be the best possible way of revising for these?Most people tell me they just memorise the essays but I really struggle with this. Is there any other ways of revising for these exams?
    What exam board is this?
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    (Original post by fire_and_ice)
    What exam board is this?
    It's the CCEA exam board
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    (Original post by Sazza3)
    It's the CCEA exam board
    I do Philosophy and Ethics OCR, and although it's not the same thing, it's very similar.

    I got an A grade for AS and am aiming for an A* for A2. Here is a revision structure I tend to abide by for it:

    1) Find the topic in the specification and make sure you know what they're asking you to learn.
    2) Copy and paste the criteria from the specification for the specific topic onto a word document.
    3) Go through the chapter in the textbook and highlight the key points.
    4) Use the highlighted points and make your own notes from them - either on the word document (like I do), or write it down. Typing it up is much more easier imo since you tend to type faster than you write, and you can also edit your notes accordingly.
    5) Look through a revision guide and see if there's anything you've missed out. If you have, convert it into your own words and type away.
    6) Print out your notes, keep reading them and highlight as time goes on.
    7) This part isn't necessary, but if you have time, make notes from the highlighted parts of your previous notes. This will help you, a lot.

    Make sure you do practise essays and get a teacher to mark them. Also, if there is something you don't understand, ask your teacher - they're paid to help you. If not, get a private tutor. From my experience, private tutors tend to help me a lot more since it's one-to-one and I'm a fast learner, so we essentially speed through topics.

    You can do the essay thing, but I wouldn't advise that. You want to mould your knowledge to fit the given question. If you memorise essays, you'll be likely to write everything from that essay without referring to what the question is asking. Sure, you can do it for other subjects - like Law, but from my experience, not for Philosophy or Religious Studies.
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    (Original post by fire_and_ice)
    I do Philosophy and Ethics OCR, and although it's not the same thing, it's very similar.

    I got an A grade for AS and am aiming for an A* for A2. Here is a revision structure I tend to abide by for it:

    1) Find the topic in the specification and make sure you know what they're asking you to learn.
    2) Copy and paste the criteria from the specification for the specific topic onto a word document.
    3) Go through the chapter in the text book and highlight the key points.
    4) Use the highlighted points and make your own notes from them - either on the word document (like I do), or write it down. Typing it up is much more easier imo since you tend to type faster than you write, and you can also edit your notes accordingly.
    5) Look through a revision guide and see if there's anything you've missed out. If you have, convert it into your own words and type away.
    6) Print out your notes, keep reading them and highlight as time goes on.
    7) This part isn't necessary, but if you have time, make notes from the higlighted parts of your previous notes. This will help you, a lot.

    Make sure you do practise essays and get a teacher to mark them. Also, if there is something you don't understand, ask your teacher - they're paid to help you. If not, get a private tutor. From my experience, private tutors tend to help me a lot more since it's one-to-one and I'm a fast learner, so we essentially speed through topics.

    You can make essays and read through them, but I wouldn't advise that. You want to mould your knowledge to fit the given question. If you memorise essays, you'll be likely to write everyhing from that essay without referring to what the question is asking. Sure, you can do it for other subjects - like Law, but from my experience, not for Philosophy or Religious Studies.
    Thanks so much for the reply and I will definitely try this out sounds much better than memorising the essays 🙌🏻
 
 
 
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