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Cambridge students cancel theme party over 'cultural appropriation' fears watch

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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Ridicule is an absolutely awful way of making someone change their perspective. It's much more likely to make them even more confident in their own beliefs and it's a very petty strategy that requires no intelligence or maturity to pull off. If you think ridicule is an effective debating strategy then I think you need a bit of a lesson in persuasion...
    Seconded.

    I think satire is an effective way of holding a mirror up which can highlight hypocrisy and make people think but active ridicule really does the opposite.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    To clarify, I don't oppose 'safe spaces' for those with mental health issues.

    As for emotional welfare -- tough. The universities concerned need to get their priorities right. They are first and foremost institutions of learning and intellectual progress. Giving in to people who claim the right not to be offended is not why they exist. Universities are not playgrounds, and it's a sad development that some universities don't seem to mind turning into playgrounds for immature individuals clinging to their sheltered childhoods at the expense of their peers and of the university that they chose to attend (at a substantial cost to both themselves and to the taxpayer).
    university is more than just an institution of learning. It's about Learning and experiencing new things and there should be safe guards in place to stop silly and hateful things from happening and causing mental and emotional disturbances. You can't just tell these people to shrug it off,doesn't make the problem go away
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Arab Jews still exist. They are Arabs who practice Judaism. They do not identify as Israelis but rather Arabs and anyway there's a lot more to it.
    Arab Jews means Arab Jews, not Arabs. Judaism is practiced only by Jews, because Judaism is national Jewish religion:
    "Judaism ( ... the distinctive characteristics of the Judean ethnos)[3] encompasses the religion, philosophy, culture and way of life of the Jewish people".
    I'm just trying kindly explain you that Jews are not Arabs and Arabs are not Jews. I hope that eventually you will be able to understand this complicated academic fact.
    :hat2:
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    I don't even believe in cultural appropriation with the exception of intentions to offend or degrade.
    Surely participating in another culture in a positive way (e.g wearing a kimono because you think it's beautiful) is just promoting the culture. I think it's just about learning about the world around us, just like eating different foods or learning about cultural behaviors. Without this, we would just be ignorant.
    Also, can't help but see people think that only white people can commit appropriation because they are a "majority" (lol) when I see no black/Asian/non-white person being told not to wear jeans or converses because they are appropriating. It's almost like people think that white people have no culture... oh wait.
    p.s when I say white people I mean Europeans or decedents of Europeans e.g. Americans, Australians, etc.
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    (Original post by admonit)
    Arab Jews means Arab Jews, not Arabs. Judaism is practiced only by Jews, because Judaism is national Jewish religion:
    "Judaism ( ... the distinctive characteristics of the Judean ethnos)[3] encompasses the religion, philosophy, culture and way of life of the Jewish people".
    I'm just trying kindly explain you that Jews are not Arabs and Arabs are not Jews. I hope that eventually you will be able to understand this complicated academic fact.
    :hat2:
    But an Arab isn't a religion?They're just a person from the middle east region so why can't there be Arab Jews?so,if they identify as Arab Jews,we have no right to tell them what they can't be.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    university is more than just an institution of learning. It's about Learning and experiencing new things and there should be safe guards in place to stop silly and hateful things from happening and causing mental and emotional disturbances. You can't just tell these people to shrug it off,doesn't make the problem go away
    PRSOM.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    You can't just tell these people to shrug it off
    I can, and that's my proposed solution for any of these posers that isn't willing to take a break/drop out.

    university is more than just an institution of learning. It's about Learning and experiencing new things and there should be safe guards in place to stop silly and hateful things from happening and causing mental and emotional disturbances.
    And these 'cultural appropriation' protesters are opposed to that -- they don't want to experience new things that they don't agree with, to the extent that they're willing to disrupt other students' time at university. It's clear to anybody with any sense that they self-victimise themselves to get what they want, not because they're actually being subjected to any injustice.

    I also think that you're confusing this issue with bullying, for which safeguards already exist. Make no mistake about it -- there aren't any victims and oppressors here. They deliberately portray it this way to get sympathy for their bulls--t cause.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I can, and that's my proposed solution for any of these posers that isn't willing to take a break/drop out.



    And these 'cultural appropriation' protesters are opposed to that -- they don't want to experience new things that they don't agree with, to the extent that they're willing to disrupt other students' time at university. It's clear to anybody with any sense that they self-victimise themselves to get what they want, not because they're actually being subjected to any injustice.

    I also think that you're confusing this issue with bullying, for which safeguards already exist. Make no mistake about it -- there aren't any victims and oppressors here. They deliberately portray it this way to get sympathy for their bulls--t cause.
    So because you haven't experienced such a thing or don't believe in it,That means it's irrelevant and that universities shouldn't bother catering the victims?
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    university is more than just an institution of learning. It's about Learning and experiencing new things and there should be safe guards in place to stop silly and hateful things from happening and causing mental and emotional disturbances. You can't just tell these people to shrug it off,doesn't make the problem go away
    But there's a line. Of course there should be rules in place e.g no racist comments with punishments if broken, but you cannot shield students from everything that offends them. That's not an accurate reflection on reality. There is no proper "safe space" in real life or the internet. What will happen when these students that were shielded from opinions that oppose their's are confronted with someone who just simply doesn't care? People need to learn that there is a lot of people out there who have all sorts of opinions and beliefs, many of which won't agree with their own.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    So because you haven't experienced such a thing or don't believe in it,That means it's irrelevant and that universities shouldn't bother catering the victims?
    Unless you're proposing that victimhood can be claimed simply by assertion, I don't think that there are any victims to cater for here.

    You also ignored most of my post to ask this question.
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    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
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    (Original post by Eigo-Jin)
    But there's a line. Of course there should be rules in place e.g no racist comments with punishments if broken, but you cannot shield students from everything that offends them. That's not an accurate reflection on reality. There is no proper "safe space" in real life or the internet. What will happen when these students that were shielded from opinions that oppose their's are confronted with someone who just simply doesn't care? People need to learn that there is a lot of people out there who have all sorts of opinions and beliefs, many of which won't agree with their own.
    This is true,but people feel genuinely concerned by such issues,so I feel the reason the universities have done something about it is because they don't want to be accused of supporting racism,exploitation of peoples cultures etc.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    Omg Thank You!

    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    Omg Thank You!
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Unless you're proposing that victimhood can be claimed simply by assertion, I don't think that there are any victims to cater for here.

    You also ignored most of my post to ask this question.
    clearly,the universities feel that there are real victims here.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    This is true,but people feel genuinely concerned by such issues,so I feel the reason the universities have done something about it is because they don't want to be accused of supporting racism,exploitation of peoples cultures etc.
    which is very sad indeed
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    This is true,but people feel genuinely concerned by such issues,so I feel the reason the universities have done something about it is because they don't want to be accused of supporting racism,exploitation of peoples cultures etc.
    I think universities have done this because they are spineless and unwilling to say to these people 'You have no right, not to be offended'. (Of course this is only true in the US as in the UK we have no freedom of speech, so all we can do is ridicule such lunacy)
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    clearly,the universities feel that there are real victims here.
    No, the universities feel that they don't have enough money to do all the things that they want to do, so they seek to gain money by admitting students who wouldn't normally be considered mature enough to be at university. If universities can be blamed for something, it's that they consider the cheapening of higher education a price worth paying for this financial advantage.

    You're also not addressing any of the points being put to you, instead going off on a new tangent with each reply. :erm:
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    (Original post by zetamcfc)
    I think universities have done this because they are spineless and unwilling to say to these people 'You have no right, not to be offended'. (Of course this is only true in the US as in the UK we have no freedom of speech)
    who is we? I'm pretty sure freedom of speech is allowed in america
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    who is we? I'm pretty sure freedom of speech is allowed in america
    If you look, the 'we' is referring to, us that live in the UK.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    It's true that real victims need help but safe spaces don't really help in my opinion, Safe spaces don't help them recover but rather tells them it's ok to never try solve the problem. Initially, perhaps, safe spaces are some sort of relief but I don't think it's needed in universities.
    Also safe spaces should be ultimately for rape victims and victims of life changing attacks not someone who's been called a "whore" a couple of times or seen someone walk around in their culture's traditional clothing. Just no.
 
 
 
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