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Cambridge students cancel theme party over 'cultural appropriation' fears Watch

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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    university is more than just an institution of learning. It's about Learning and experiencing new things and there should be safe guards in place to stop silly and hateful things from happening and causing mental and emotional disturbances. You can't just tell these people to shrug it off,doesn't make the problem go away
    But there's a line. Of course there should be rules in place e.g no racist comments with punishments if broken, but you cannot shield students from everything that offends them. That's not an accurate reflection on reality. There is no proper "safe space" in real life or the internet. What will happen when these students that were shielded from opinions that oppose their's are confronted with someone who just simply doesn't care? People need to learn that there is a lot of people out there who have all sorts of opinions and beliefs, many of which won't agree with their own.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    So because you haven't experienced such a thing or don't believe in it,That means it's irrelevant and that universities shouldn't bother catering the victims?
    Unless you're proposing that victimhood can be claimed simply by assertion, I don't think that there are any victims to cater for here.

    You also ignored most of my post to ask this question.
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    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
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    (Original post by Eigo-Jin)
    But there's a line. Of course there should be rules in place e.g no racist comments with punishments if broken, but you cannot shield students from everything that offends them. That's not an accurate reflection on reality. There is no proper "safe space" in real life or the internet. What will happen when these students that were shielded from opinions that oppose their's are confronted with someone who just simply doesn't care? People need to learn that there is a lot of people out there who have all sorts of opinions and beliefs, many of which won't agree with their own.
    This is true,but people feel genuinely concerned by such issues,so I feel the reason the universities have done something about it is because they don't want to be accused of supporting racism,exploitation of peoples cultures etc.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    Omg Thank You!

    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    Omg Thank You!
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Unless you're proposing that victimhood can be claimed simply by assertion, I don't think that there are any victims to cater for here.

    You also ignored most of my post to ask this question.
    clearly,the universities feel that there are real victims here.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    This is true,but people feel genuinely concerned by such issues,so I feel the reason the universities have done something about it is because they don't want to be accused of supporting racism,exploitation of peoples cultures etc.
    which is very sad indeed
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    This is true,but people feel genuinely concerned by such issues,so I feel the reason the universities have done something about it is because they don't want to be accused of supporting racism,exploitation of peoples cultures etc.
    I think universities have done this because they are spineless and unwilling to say to these people 'You have no right, not to be offended'. (Of course this is only true in the US as in the UK we have no freedom of speech, so all we can do is ridicule such lunacy)
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    clearly,the universities feel that there are real victims here.
    No, the universities feel that they don't have enough money to do all the things that they want to do, so they seek to gain money by admitting students who wouldn't normally be considered mature enough to be at university. If universities can be blamed for something, it's that they consider the cheapening of higher education a price worth paying for this financial advantage.

    You're also not addressing any of the points being put to you, instead going off on a new tangent with each reply. :erm:
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    (Original post by zetamcfc)
    I think universities have done this because they are spineless and unwilling to say to these people 'You have no right, not to be offended'. (Of course this is only true in the US as in the UK we have no freedom of speech)
    who is we? I'm pretty sure freedom of speech is allowed in america
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    who is we? I'm pretty sure freedom of speech is allowed in america
    If you look, the 'we' is referring to, us that live in the UK.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    It's true that real victims need help but safe spaces don't really help in my opinion, Safe spaces don't help them recover but rather tells them it's ok to never try solve the problem. Initially, perhaps, safe spaces are some sort of relief but I don't think it's needed in universities.
    Also safe spaces should be ultimately for rape victims and victims of life changing attacks not someone who's been called a "whore" a couple of times or seen someone walk around in their culture's traditional clothing. Just no.
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    (Original post by zetamcfc)
    If you look, the 'we' is referring to, us that live in the UK.
    so you have no freedom of speech?
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    (Original post by Eigo-Jin)
    It's true that real victims need help but safe spaces don't really help in my opinion, Safe spaces don't help them recover but rather tells them it's ok to never try solve the problem. Initially, perhaps, safe spaces are some sort of relief but I don't think it's needed in universities.
    Also safe spaces should be ultimately for rape victims and victims of life changing attacks not someone who's been called a "whore" a couple of times or seen someone walk around in their culture's traditional clothing. Just no.
    It's easy to see safe spaces as juvenile if we refuse to acknowledge the invisible burdens that some people carry more than others and the different needs that they might have. Victims of rape and other such incidents have various avenues to get immediate help, and they have their own safe-spaces. But just because you are unable to relate to the problems faced by these groups, it doesn't mean the concept of safe-spaces is somehow flawed. Sure, there's a time and a place for debate, mockery, banter and whatnot, but sometimes these groups feel the need to take breaks - which is perfectly fine.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    so you have no freedom of speech?
    Well no, we have hate speech laws in the UK thus no freedom of speech. Whereas in the US such laws are unconstitutional.
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    I don't see anything wrong with celebrating someone else's culture...
    If it is worn to offend then obviously that's an issue but other than that it shouldn't be a problem.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    I don't think safe-spaces are a bad idea. When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter", when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them, when marginalised people are told to "get over it" and "deal with it" - then I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere.
    So essentially treat women and minorities like babies.

    There isn't necessarily any benefit in discussing issues away from 'harmful' or dismissive attitudes, particularly in universities. This creates echo chambers where an almost masturbatory sense of victimhood will flourish, and a place where people only learn that they're always right. The offended and the 'marginalised' aren't infallible: they can get carried away with things, they can be wrong, they can be irrational. There's no-one to tell them this in a "safe space".

    Don't want people offending, criticizing, or challenging your beliefs and sensibilities? Set up these 'safe spaces' on your own time at home. A University is supposed to be an open environment with free speech, free expression, and freedom of debate; not a place where people are coddled and hidden from potential upset. People should use this time at University to learn, argue, and be challenged. There aren't going to be any " safe spaces" in the real world.
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    (Original post by Dandaman1)
    So essentially treat women and minorities like babies.

    There isn't necessarily any benefit in discussing issues away from 'harmful' or dismissive attitudes, particularly in universities. This creates echo chambers where an almost mastabotory sense of victimhood will flourish, and a place where people only learn that they're always right. The offended and the 'marginalised' aren't infallible: they can get carried away with things, they can be wrong, they can be irrational. There's no-one to tell them this in a "safe space".

    Don't want people offending, criticizing, or challenging your beliefs and sensibilities? Set up these 'safe spaces' on your own time at home. A University is supposed to be an open environment with free speech, free expression, and freedom of debate; not a place where people are coddled and hidden from potential upset. People should use this time at University to learn, argue, and be challenged. There aren't going to be any " safe spaces" in the real world.
    Well said. PRSOM.
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    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    It's easy to see safe spaces as juvenile if we refuse to acknowledge the invisible burdens that some people carry more than others and the different needs that they might have. Victims of rape and other such incidents have various avenues to get immediate help, and they have their own safe-spaces. But just because you are unable to relate to the problems faced by these groups, it doesn't mean the concept of safe-spaces is somehow flawed. Sure, there's a time and a place for debate, mockery, banter and whatnot, but sometimes these groups feel the need to take breaks - which is perfectly fine.
    Safe spaces are not juvenile, it only becomes so when people need a safe space for every little thing. It would be alright if people used it for breaks but it's known not to be the case.
    It's silly to ponder why rape victims get immediate help versus someone who had a breakdown because they heard the word "******". Which one has a bigger mental strain? There's a fine line between relief and babying.
    It takes maturity to confront your issues and confess that you are carrying the burden in the first place. It's only invisible because they themselves refuse to acknowledge it.
    And going back to the rape victim vs name calling, both do need help but only one needs a safe space. If someone cannot recover from even that, then they are unfit to enter the adult world anyway.
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    (Original post by Shillary)
    :lolwut:
    Which part don’t you get amigo?

    (Original post by queen-bee)
    I don't see cultural appropriation solves anything
    It’s an inexorable by-product of factors integral to encouraging celebration of/active immersion in/inculcation of diversity, inclusiveness, and cultural exchange. I’d have thought you’d be broadly supportive (except in instances of clear bigotry/disrespect)

    take credit for something that is not from your culture and passing it off as your own/making fun of it/ridiculing is what people are upset about
    I have some sympathy for them in this respect, but how is Kim doing any of those things in dressing up as Princess Jasmine? :confused:

    (Original post by queen-bee)
    if it means protecting minorities cultures from being exploited
    You have rather a rare and idiosyncratic definition of exploitation if it includes replication, imitation, and satire, my love

    Yes, Lawrence of Arabia was culturally appropriating Arab culture for sure
    Thank you

    was he intentionally mocking us?
    You can’t have it both ways sugar. Either all cultural appropriation is wrong, or just the type that involves intentional mocking (Kim cannot be included in this, narrower, sub-definition)

    I was only a teen back then and none the wiser about these issues
    So you would never do such a thing again? Darling, have you seen your own avatar!? :laugh:

    I would like to think of her as a middle eastern character, being based in north Africa
    Actually, you’re not far wrong, as it turns out – it appears she was Ptolemaic (Macedonian) Greek in descent, and you are Levantine (from a people who originate from SE Europe, the Levant, and semitic regions that extend into what was the Ptolemaic kingdom) :innocent:

    Therefore is it really cultural appropriation?
    Imitating the character ostensively serves as to condone/lend support to Disney/American cultural appropriation

    I think the way they depict her character is distasteful and an insult to our culture, frankly
    Yet you’re happy to dress up as, and fantasize about acting out, her character:mute:

    what about the whole calling foreign women from countries like the middle east or south America 'exotic'? racial fetishisation
    Exotic simply means foreign and (hence) unusual. It’s a novelty/charm factor, but not predicated on any particular fetish necessarily

    If i choose to dress however i desire?:giggle::lolwut::zomg:
    So long as our desires remain aligned this question is moot; should there be any divergence, well, then we can have a conversation :bandit:

    i don't think anything positive comes out from doing so?
    Yet you don’t want to live in a world devoid of classic comedy and satire, so you self-evidently do see how positive (energy) comes of it. I think part of the problem here is that you’re putting out a very confused message as to what you mean by cultural appropriation. Additionally, you must see how for a character like Kim or Lawrence, a lot of ‘good’ comes, from their POV/that of their fans/followers, from their cultural appropriation

    (Original post by queen-bee)
    well ,isn't is obvious that the universities care about the emotional and mental welfare of their students?
    That, and, more to the point, the fact they’re paranoid about falling foul of anti-discrimination and anti-terror legislation (providing a platform for prejudice and extremism)

    (Original post by Dima-Blackburn)
    When slurs demeaning women are thrown around everywhere in the name of "banter"
    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Omg Thank You!
    Have y’all never heard women going on about men? Truth is the worst slurs on both genders tend to come from women. Are we crying about it? Nope. We suck it up and laugh at them/ourselves, no problem. It’s called stiff upper lip + self-deprecation, two very British traits :chaplin:

    when the cultural practices of minorities are mocked, parodied and/or appropriated
    1) What does minority vs. majority status have to do with anything?

    2) What is wrong with a little light teasing/satire?

    3) What about members of ‘minority’ groups who mock/satirise their own culture?

    4) Where do you draw the line with 'appropriation' e.g. along civilisational lines, regional, national, linguistic, local-geographic, ethnic, tribal?

    5) What happened to the ‘one world’ paradigm, and the denial of the ‘them and us’ (only applies when it suits certain ‘progressive’ narratives)?

    by people who neither understand nor appreciate the context and history behind them
    What of the billions of non-Western people who form majorities in their own lands who have appropriated Western cultural elements with little or no understanding of such things. Are they committing some kind of sin too e.g. by trying to join us in the 21st century/better their societies/lives?

    I can see why said marginalised groups would require safe-spaces to discuss their issues in the absence of harmful, dismissive attitudes prevalent elsewhere
    Absolutely agree, but they have the law to protect them at any rate, and safe spaces in the form of private/membership based counselling, peer-support, clubs, groups, meetings, and venues, but not on taxpayer/tuition fee payer time, money, facilities, and not to the exclusion of others who have every right to make full use of such resources, and engage freely in public forums (a hard fought right, under international law), hell no!
 
 
 
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