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    Hi there! I'm starting an access to life science course in September, which is basically 2 years of a levels in 1 year. However, the course does not contain physics at level 3 or at all, and some of the universities that offer the course I want to do have stated that they require physics as part of the access course.

    What should I do?

    I have considered learning physics online and have been advised by Birmingham (my firm) to do this.

    Anyone else have any suggestions?

    Thanks!
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    What course is it you want to do after the access course? If Birmingham has recommended it then it's probably a good idea, however my access course was very intense and I'm not sure I could have fit that level of self learning in as well.
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    (Original post by JBLondon)
    What course is it you want to do after the access course? If Birmingham has recommended it then it's probably a good idea, however my access course was very intense and I'm not sure I could have fit that level of self learning in as well.
    Hi Jb! thanks for the answer - I plan on studying Diagnostic Radiography.

    I could complete the physics credits before I start my access course in September.

    It's so hard accommodating to all of the universities needs but it has to be done to increase my chances of getting a place.

    One of the unis even said that I could just learn basic physics from home and not take a test or anything..
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    (Original post by KyleH123)

    I could complete the physics credits before I start my access course in September.

    It's so hard accommodating to all of the universities needs but it has to be done to increase my chances of getting a place.
    So my situation was that my Access to Medicine course was changed by the college to include no physics, as the college felt that universities prefer more Biology and Chemistry modules for medicine applicants. This was good and bad, as it did give us more biology and chemistry, but it limited our choice of uni's, and also made it harder to get into certain places; this was because some uni's state all biology and chemistry must be at distinction level. Therefore if we had some physics modules, a couple of merits wouldn't have hurt us, but on our course we had to get every module at distinction to be able to get into those universities.

    You won't be able to accommodate every uni's requirements. What I did was target my applications to universities I knew I had a good chance with based on my modules. Ultimately I definitely think I would have struggled to do my access course and additional physics stuff at the same time.

    I managed to get a place for medicine starting in September this year, so if you plan properly, it's entirely possible. Just don't put too much work onto yourself.
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    (Original post by JBLondon)
    So my situation was that my Access to Medicine course was changed by the college to include no physics, as the college felt that universities prefer more Biology and Chemistry modules for medicine applicants. This was good and bad, as it did give us more biology and chemistry, but it limited our choice of uni's, and also made it harder to get into certain places; this was because some uni's state all biology and chemistry must be at distinction level. Therefore if we had some physics modules, a couple of merits wouldn't have hurt us, but on our course we had to get every module at distinction to be able to get into those universities.

    You won't be able to accommodate every uni's requirements. What I did was target my applications to universities I knew I had a good chance with based on my modules. Ultimately I definitely think I would have struggled to do my access course and additional physics stuff at the same time.

    I managed to get a place for medicine starting in September this year, so if you plan properly, it's entirely possible. Just don't put too much work onto yourself.
    Wow! congrats on a getting a place for medicine! I'm not too sure about which unis I have the best chance of getting into, should I just go for the unis that expect the lowest grades or?
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    Cardiff University – 5 GCSEs including English language,maths, physics and one or other science
    BMU – Minimum of 2 GCSEs in English language and Mathematics, including an access course at 30 credits at merit or distinction,with 6 credits at level 3 in Physics.
    Cumbria – English & Maths – Distinction in all level 3credits Bangor – Access to HE in a science subject with adistinction profile. Exeter - GCSES in English & a validated access course.
    Portsmouth – GCSE eng/maths alternatives accepted. Accesscourse accepted leniently.
    Teeside – Access accepted alongside Literacy and numeracy atC+
    Bradford – 30 credits at distinction and 15 level 3 creditsat meritGCSE - Eng and Maths
    Derby – Access diploma as well as English and Maths
    Hertfordshire – Access alongside English and Maths GCSELondon
    south bank university – Access course + GCSe Eng andMaths.

    I left school with only 2 GCSEs at C+ which certainly made my situation more difficult (I believe to be a result of personal problems), and this scratches a few unis off of the potential list.

    (Original post by JBLondon)
    So my situation was that my Access to Medicine course was changed by the college to include no physics, as the college felt that universities prefer more Biology and Chemistry modules for medicine applicants. This was good and bad, as it did give us more biology and chemistry, but it limited our choice of uni's, and also made it harder to get into certain places; this was because some uni's state all biology and chemistry must be at distinction level. Therefore if we had some physics modules, a couple of merits wouldn't have hurt us, but on our course we had to get every module at distinction to be able to get into those universities.

    You won't be able to accommodate every uni's requirements. What I did was target my applications to universities I knew I had a good chance with based on my modules. Ultimately I definitely think I would have struggled to do my access course and additional physics stuff at the same time.

    I managed to get a place for medicine starting in September this year, so if you plan properly, it's entirely possible. Just don't put too much work onto yourself.
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    (Original post by KyleH123)

    I left school with only 2 GCSEs at C+ which certainly made my situation more difficult (I believe to be a result of personal problems), and this scratches a few unis off of the potential list.
    If you think it was as a result of personal problems, a lot of universities will allow you to submit mitigating circumstances for lower GCSE grades. Best thing to do is speak to them before your application.

    I wouldn't target the lower requirements, just tailor your application towards ones you know you have a good shot with.
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    (Original post by JBLondon)
    If you think it was as a result of personal problems, a lot of universities will allow you to submit mitigating circumstances for lower GCSE grades. Best thing to do is speak to them before your application.

    I wouldn't target the lower requirements, just tailor your application towards ones you know you have a good shot with.
    How do I know I have a good shot? Sorry if it's a silly question
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    Contact your intended institution for your degree and ask them how you shuld proceed. they should know what access courses they consider adequate. Its common to do an access course at the same institution as then they teach you exactly what they think you ought to know and it gives you an advantage of getting on the main degree.
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    (Original post by KyleH123)
    How do I know I have a good shot? Sorry if it's a silly question
    Well just from a quick glance at the list you posted, Bradford as an example doesn't even mention Physics, just numbers of credits at distinction and merit.

    Ultimately if there's a uni that you really have your heart set on that requires physics, do it before you start your Access course.
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    (Original post by JBLondon)
    Well just from a quick glance at the list you posted, Bradford as an example doesn't even mention Physics, just numbers of credits at distinction and merit.

    Ultimately if there's a uni that you really have your heart set on that requires physics, do it before you start your Access course.
    Thanks, I really want to go to Birmingham, and they suggest online physics.

    Really appreciate the replies
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    (Original post by KyleH123)
    Thanks, I really want to go to Birmingham, and they suggest online physics.

    Really appreciate the replies
    No worries mate, best of luck. Access courses are hard work but if you put the work in they are totally worth it.
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    (Original post by JBLondon)
    No worries mate, best of luck. Access courses are hard work but if you put the work in they are totally worth it.
    I think what I'll do is do the online physics and complete my access course, then apply. if I don't get a place next year then I'll do as much as I can do fulfil other unis requirements
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    (Original post by KyleH123)
    I think what I'll do is do the online physics and complete my access course, then apply. if I don't get a place next year then I'll do as much as I can do fulfil other unis requirements
    What JBL said makes sense about taking your time and not overdoing it. be patient and work with your intended institution. An extra year is nothing in the grand scheme of things.
 
 
 
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