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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Southampton isn't generally super targeted, but that doesn't mean someone from there with solid grades, industry knowledge, enthusiasm etc can't get an FO IB job.

    Universities as a whole are targeted not courses. Plus, I'd wager most students going into engineering at Warwick will have surpassed the entry requirements. The min. performance at A-level to get past the automated screening software is usually ABB-AAB.


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    That's fair enough. I just want to make sure that I'm not doing a degree that I believe to be great for career prospects, only to find out that I can't get a job when the degree is over. Would doing Engineering with Management help my prospects?

    (Original post by Terry Tibbs)
    You keep mentioning solid grades, since a 2:1 in minimum to even be considered for FO roles the only better you can do is a 1st, does a 1st really give you much of an edge over someone with a 2:1 when the focus by banks is more on your ECs and work experience?
    I'm not sure but I think that the grade you get in your degree is vital for getting the interview. Of course ECs and Work Experience are important on your application, but they really help in the interview where you can bring them up and refer to them as they are what form you as a person.

    p.s. I'm rather tired so sorry if that doesn't make sense!
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    (Original post by jakepds)
    That's fair enough. I just want to make sure that I'm not doing a degree that I believe to be great for career prospects, only to find out that I can't get a job when the degree is over. Would doing Engineering with Management help my prospects?
    Everyone runs the risk of not being able to find a job after uni! There are no guarantees (except for Vet Med/Med), that's why you have to beef up your CV with as many 'quality' experiences and ECs as possible. I've never understood why people put so much stock into 'grad prospects' when most jobs (70-75% of grad jobs) don't specify a course requirement.

    Surely, getting a job is down to how you've spent your time at uni (leadership positions, insight programmes, networking, ECs etc) and how well you interview than about the degree you do? I find it's better to study what you enjoy and can succeed at whilst also immersing yourself in employability boosting activities whilst at uni. What you learn at university will, largely, not be applied directly to whatever job you end up in. This is true for even seemingly 'career related' degrees like engineering, finance, etc.

    Engineering management might preclude you from going into an engineering role itself but it wouldn't boost nor diminish your chances for anything else.




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    (Original post by jakepds)
    That's fair enough. I just want to make sure that I'm not doing a degree that I believe to be great for career prospects, only to find out that I can't get a job when the degree is over. Would doing Engineering with Management help my prospects?
    If you do a Physics degree from any well respected uni you'll have excellent career prospects and it can lead you to a multitude of different industries/career paths, not because what you learn is directly applicable but because of the versatility in the skills that you develop from doing it. I'd imagine an engineering degree is very similar in that regard.

    (Original post by jakepds)
    I'm not sure but I think that the grade you get in your degree is vital for getting the interview. Of course ECs and Work Experience are important on your application, but they really help in the interview where you can bring them up and refer to them as they are what form you as a person.p.s. I'm rather tired so sorry if that doesn't make sense!
    For most graduate jobs it will make quite a difference for landing interviews but for investment banking where most of the applications are done as an undergraduate for spring weeks/summer internships, you'll have only the grade that you're working towards at that current time which could be different to the grade you get once you graduate. Besides, some courses are harder to get a first in than others especially across different universities and since banks don't concern themselves with what course you do, I can't imagine getting a first puts you that far ahead from those who get a 2:1.
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    (Original post by PrinceNuada)
    'At a strong target' Econ>A&F

    BSc Economics is a pretty strong degree.

    Okay, you cannot apply economic knowledge to investment banking. But an undergraduate physicist wouldn't be able to apply his knowledge either, this doesn't mean (s)he's less suited to the job.

    Level of applicability doesn't really affect graduate prospects (unless doing an MFin).

    The main factor is whether it's a target university, and to a lesser extent, how quantitative and rigorous the degree is.
    I would rather pay 9000 knowing that I can somehow apply what I learn both in my personal financial life and on the job, instead of learning how to regurditate the black-scholes model. Not saying that economics is a low quality or soft degree, it is difficult indeed, but doing it is unjustified if you're stricly looking to enter finance. You can do a watered down degree e.g finance at a target and be as successful as an economics applicant, and enjoy your 3 years before becoming a corporate wage slave.
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    (Original post by glebp)
    I would rather pay 9000 knowing that I can somehow apply what I learn both in my personal financial life and on the job, instead of learning how to regurditate the black-scholes model. Not saying that economics is a low quality or soft degree, it is difficult indeed, but doing it is unjustified if you're stricly looking to enter finance. You can do a watered down degree e.g finance at a target and be as successful as an economics applicant, and enjoy your 3 years before becoming a corporate wage slave.
    I don't really want to do the accounting modules as I have heard that these are really boring.

    Apart from at LSE, (admittedly I haven't looked) but I haven't seen any other straight finance courses.

    I wouldn't really call it a corporate wage slave; thats a sweeping generalisation. If you enjoy something, then you can never be a slave to it...
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    Doing chemical engineering at nottingham, on a 2:1 at the moment, if I do get a 2:1 do i stand a good chance of getting a job in FO/MO? I have no relevant financial work experience, but have some in chem engineering. Any advice on gaining some financial work exp/internships etc without having any previous experience to call on in that field. I have a year in industry in chemical engineering coming up, followed by my masters year, should i continue until after these are finished, or consider leaving with the BEng after third year? Thanks
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    (Original post by cpfc96)
    Doing chemical engineering at nottingham, on a 2:1 at the moment, if I do get a 2:1 do i stand a good chance of getting a job in FO/MO? I have no relevant financial work experience, but have some in chem engineering. Any advice on gaining some financial work exp/internships etc without having any previous experience to call on in that field. I have a year in industry in chemical engineering coming up, followed by my masters year, should i continue until after these are finished, or consider leaving with the BEng after third year? Thanks
    Fix this.

    Your best bet atm, is to apply for summer internships at the start of the upcoming academic year. Apply to every single BB, middle market and boutique bank you can find. There's a finance society at Notts, make the most of it! Reach out to the speakers that come, to other Notts kids doing well (my pal just got nominated President, he's a solid guy to speak to) with internships/spring weeks for advice. Your only path in is through aggressive networking via the finance society + Linkedin, and applying anywhere and everywhere for internships. On your CV, I'd emphasise on how your experience in engineering thus far could transfer into finance (working with numbers, any project work etc).

    In the mean time, make sure to keep up with any extra curricular involvement that you can get your hands on - ideally, shoot for a leadership role somewhere.

    It can be done, you're just going to need to work for it. Good luck.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Fix this.

    Your best bet atm, is to apply for summer internships at the start of the upcoming academic year. Apply to every single BB, middle market and boutique bank you can find. There's a finance society at Notts, make the most of it! Reach out to the speakers that come, to other Notts kids doing well (my pal just got nominated President, he's a solid guy to speak to) with internships/spring weeks for advice. Your only path in is through aggressive networking via the finance society + Linkedin, and applying anywhere and everywhere for internships. On your CV, I'd emphasise on how your experience in engineering thus far could transfer into finance (working with numbers, any project work etc).

    In the mean time, make sure to keep up with any extra curricular involvement that you can get your hands on - ideally, shoot for a leadership role somewhere.

    It can be done, you're just going to need to work for it. Good luck.

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    One thing I was curious about was whether one needed the MEng or if the BEng was adequate for banking?
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    (Original post by jakepds)
    One thing I was curious about was whether one needed the MEng or if the BEng was adequate for banking?
    Literally doesn't matter for banking - depends whether you want an extra year or not in uni.

    However, if you ever wanted to stick to engineering, an MEng is hugely beneficial if you want to progress up the ladder (i.e. become a chattered engineer).

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Literally doesn't matter for banking - depends whether you want an extra year or not in uni.

    However, if you ever wanted to stick to engineering, an MEng is hugely beneficial if you want to progress up the ladder (i.e. become a chattered engineer).

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    They don't care even slightly if you've done a masters?
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    (Original post by Terry Tibbs)
    They don't care even slightly if you've done a masters?
    Nope. Unless of course, it's a specialised quant finance masters that you're trying to leverage into some form of quant role.
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    Currently, I am looking at various options for alternative courses that may lead to IB, just to see if there is anything a little more related to banking and finance. I know I don't want to do straight economics but to have it in my degree may be a nice addition.

    I have found the finance degree at LSE to be an interesting idea, are there any similar courses elsewhere where I could get into IB?

    MORSE at Warwick and Southampton also appeal, but I don't know about Southampton for IB?

    Would Accounting and Finance allow me to get into IB, or is it seen as a less rigorous degree? I'm not sure about the Accounting section of the degree, from what I have hear dat is boring.
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    (Original post by jakepds)
    Currently, I am looking at various options for alternative courses that may lead to IB, just to see if there is anything a little more related to banking and finance. I know I don't want to do straight economics but to have it in my degree may be a nice addition.

    I have found the finance degree at LSE to be an interesting idea, are there any similar courses elsewhere where I could get into IB?

    MORSE at Warwick and Southampton also appeal, but I don't know about Southampton for IB?

    Would Accounting and Finance allow me to get into IB, or is it seen as a less rigorous degree? I'm not sure about the Accounting section of the degree, from what I have hear dat is boring.
    Uni brand > Subject.

    I'd urge you to do a degree you WANT to do and not a degree you think will look nice. You'll be studying it for 3-4 years of your life, you shouldn't make it a whimsical choice.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Uni brand > Subject.

    I'd urge you to do a degree you WANT to do and not a degree you think will look nice. You'll be studying it for 3-4 years of your life, you shouldn't make it a whimsical choice.

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    That has been why I am looking at more financial based degrees. I worry about the Finance degree at LSE because it is unique and so will be hard to write a PS that will suit it as well as other different degrees, right?
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    (Original post by jakepds)
    That has been why I am looking at more financial based degrees. I worry about the Finance degree at LSE because it is unique and so will be hard to write a PS that will suit it as well as other different degrees, right?
    I'm sure an economics/maths oriented personal statement would suffice - possibly with a link to finance thrown in.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I'm sure an economics/maths oriented personal statement would suffice - possibly with a link to finance thrown in.

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    That makes sense. I know you say institution means more than course, but would AccFin be an okay degree to do.

    Does anyone know if it is boring etc? I am going to look into it a bit.
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    (Original post by jakepds)
    That makes sense. I know you say institution means more than course, but would AccFin be an okay degree to do.

    Does anyone know if it is boring etc? I am going to look into it a bit.
    Yes.
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    (Original post by jakepds)
    That makes sense. I know you say institution means more than course, but would AccFin be an okay degree to do.

    Does anyone know if it is boring etc? I am going to look into it a bit.
    A bit subjective but whether or not the accounting part is boring depends on you as an individual. Admittedly I only know one person studying AccFin at Warwick and she absolutely loved it, of the people I know who did Acc modules as part of Management degrees 1 of them loved it, the other 2 found it boring. I'd probably recommend that you look at some of the Accounting modules that you'll do in university and self teach some of the content to see if it interests you. It may be worth mentioning that even pure Finance degrees will contain some elements of accounting (albeit fairly small depending on the uni).
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    (Original post by Earl Campbell)
    A bit subjective but whether or not the accounting part is boring depends on you as an individual. Admittedly I only know one person studying AccFin at Warwick and she absolutely loved it, of the people I know who did Acc modules as part of Management degrees 1 of them loved it, the other 2 found it boring. I'd probably recommend that you look at some of the Accounting modules that you'll do in university and self teach some of the content to see if it interests you. It may be worth mentioning that even pure Finance degrees will contain some elements of accounting (albeit fairly small depending on the uni).
    Have you an knowledge on other finance degrees from alternative institutions?

    The only pure Finance ones that I have found are at LSE and Cass, I have also found a few "Financial Mathematics" and "Finance with Maths" as well as MORSE, all of which appeal and I imagine would serve me well.
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    Brah you keep asking about different degrees, if you can get into IB with it, and you get the same response every time. It doesn't matter what degree you do, if it's a target you have an equal chance. Just make sure you have relevant extra curricular activities on top of good grades and apply to spring weeks to boost your chance of getting an internship.
    SimpleZ!
 
 
 
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