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    All my solutions were basically the exact same as the official solutions. I'm hoping for 60, but if I have made small errors in my workings that could well be 58 or 59. (Hamilton). I did BMO1 and 2 earlier in the year and I was quite thankful it wasn't as difficult as that. If it was, I might have tried to eat my brain...
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    (Original post by Maths465Man)
    All my solutions were basically the exact same as the official solutions. I'm hoping for 60, but if I have made small errors in my workings that could well be 58 or 59. (Hamilton). I did BMO1 and 2 earlier in the year and I was quite thankful it wasn't as difficult as that. If it was, I might have tried to eat my brain...
    I want to do the BMOs next year, (couldn't this year for a variety of reasons), so what sort of stuff do you need to know, particularly geometry-wise? And whatever the marks you get, you'll still be in the prize category so I wouldn't worry too much. You always have next year to get a perfect score!
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    (Original post by BriannaTheBreeze)
    I want to do the BMOs next year, (couldn't this year for a variety of reasons), so what sort of stuff do you need to know, particularly geometry-wise? And whatever the marks you get, you'll still be in the prize category so I wouldn't worry too much. You always have next year to get a perfect score!
    I'm pretty sure that I got 60; it's just I'm prone to making a few trivial mistakes.

    I would advise getting Geoff Smith's 'A Mathematical Olympiad Primer' for BMO1. Should do you well. I got 34 for BMO1 and only 8 on BMO2. Next year, I want to get at least 50 on BMO1 and about 30 on BMO2. I'd like to make Trinity after missing out this year.

    For the things to know, physicsmaths and Renzhi10122 will give you a more accurate picture (they both made it to Trinity this year). Generally it's all in Geoff's book. I would advise getting more familiar with A-Level Maths before you look start past papers. I found it useful having C1-4 M1-2 FP1 and S1-2 knowledge as having the extra knowledge massively helps.

    Best of luck for the future
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    (Original post by Maths465Man)
    I'm pretty sure that I got 60; it's just I'm prone to making a few trivial mistakes.

    I would advise getting Geoff Smith's 'A Mathematical Olympiad Primer' for BMO1. Should do you well. I got 34 for BMO1 and only 8 on BMO2. Next year, I want to get at least 50 on BMO1 and about 30 on BMO2. I'd like to make Trinity after missing out this year.

    For the things to know, physicsmaths and Renzhi10122 will give you a more accurate picture (they both made it to Trinity this year). Generally it's all in Geoff's book. I would advise getting more familiar with A-Level Maths before you look start past papers. I found it useful having C1-4 M1-2 FP1 and S1-2 knowledge as having the extra knowledge massively helps.

    Best of luck for the future
    Thank you! I've heard a lot of recommendations for that book so I'm going to get it when I can. I've covered C1-C3 already and bits of C4, and I'm fine on S1 & 2 as well. I guess that means I have to do more Mechanics and Pure then. I can live with that. I love Pure, not so much Mechanics... And I'd love to make Trinity some day, do you know what the usual mark to get in is? You're pretty certain to get in at some point anyway- you seem to be very good from what you've stated above. Good luck for future mathmo-ing!
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    (Original post by BriannaTheBreeze)
    Thank you! I've heard a lot of recommendations for that book so I'm going to get it when I can. I've covered C1-C3 already and bits of C4, and I'm fine on S1 & 2 as well. I guess that means I have to do more Mechanics and Pure then. I can live with that. I love Pure, not so much Mechanics... And I'd love to make Trinity some day, do you know what the usual mark to get in is? You're pretty certain to get in at some point anyway- you seem to be very good from what you've stated above. Good luck for future mathmo-ing!
    You don't have to necessarily know Mechanics for the BMO exams it's just it will be an advantage to you because you will just know more maths (if that makes sense). The mark changes every year depending on how everybody did. They admit approx. 20 people every year. Just aim for at least 20 in BMO2 that will probably be ok.

    Hopefully I make Trinity one day especially as that would mean I would only improve by about 15 marks in BMO2 in the next three years. I doubt I'll make the IMO, but you never know... (joking I have no chance).

    Thanks you seem to be doing pretty well yourself. Good luck in the future too
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    (Original post by Maths465Man)
    You don't have to necessarily know Mechanics for the BMO exams it's just it will be an advantage to you because you will just know more maths (if that makes sense). The mark changes every year depending on how everybody did. They admit approx. 20 people every year. Just aim for at least 20 in BMO2 that will probably be ok.

    Hopefully I make Trinity one day especially as that would mean I would only improve by about 15 marks in BMO2 in the next three years. I doubt I'll make the IMO, but you never know... (joking I have no chance).

    Thanks you seem to be doing pretty well yourself. Good luck in the future too
    Ah ok, that makes sense. Maths is maths, after all. And I get you on IMO- but everyone has no chance, so you have about as much no-chance as anyone else! You're in the year above me, so who knows- maybe one day I'll see you at Trinity! For the second time, good luck! (I'll stop bugging you now haha!)
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    (Original post by BriannaTheBreeze)
    ...
    (Original post by Maths465Man)
    ...
    Geez, people are getting started so early these days... sort of wish I had done that. So for geometry, in BMO1, there's not much to it really apart from circle theorems. For BMO2, a bit more is needed, maybe angle bisector, etc etc (there are lots of random theorems in geometry, the more you know the more likely you'll be able to solve a question), I'd say Plane Euclidean Geometry perhaps contains pretty much everything you'll need to know + more (I haven't got it, but I know what the contents page says)? But the key after that is to get practising, in particular, knowing how to prove things, eg, if they ask you to prove that three lines concur, how might you go about doing that (desargues' is the thing I think of first, which sometimes works, but usually, you'll have to spot things in your accurate diagram, with a few extra lines and points added)? Oh, also note the importance of similar triangles Proving two angles are the same can be done through a pure angle chase, and when that fails, go for SAS with two angles which can be proven to the same slightly easier. If you ever get stuck in BMO1, just go through your circle theorems, which ones haven't you used? It'll probably get you through the problem. Also, which condition in the question haven't you used? If you're stuck, reread the question. Also, If you finish the problem, and you haven't used a condition in the question, you've probably done it wrong unless they've been super mean and have put a red herring in (which they won't do for BMOs)
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    (Original post by Maths465Man)
    All my solutions were basically the exact same as the official solutions. I'm hoping for 60, but if I have made small errors in my workings that could well be 58 or 59. (Hamilton). I did BMO1 and 2 earlier in the year and I was quite thankful it wasn't as difficult as that. If it was, I might have tried to eat my brain...
    I wish I was as smart as you - you are so lucky!! I did the Cayley and, as I only answered 4 questions well, I know I've got merit! Really annoying as I was arguing with myself whether it was worth looking at a fifth question. I got a bronze JMC medal last year, so a bit annoying I haven't got another. Well, hopefully I'll do better in the Hamilton and BMOs!
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    (Original post by Renzhi10122)
    Geez, people are getting started so early these days... sort of wish I had done that. So for geometry, in BMO1, there's not much to it really apart from circle theorems. For BMO2, a bit more is needed, maybe angle bisector, etc etc (there are lots of random theorems in geometry, the more you know the more likely you'll be able to solve a question), I'd say Plane Euclidean Geometry perhaps contains pretty much everything you'll need to know + more (I haven't got it, but I know what the contents page says)? But the key after that is to get practising, in particular, knowing how to prove things, eg, if they ask you to prove that three lines concur, how might you go about doing that (desargues' is the thing I think of first, which sometimes works, but usually, you'll have to spot things in your accurate diagram, with a few extra lines and points added)? Oh, also note the importance of similar triangles Proving two angles are the same can be done through a pure angle chase, and when that fails, go for SAS with two angles which can be proven to the same slightly easier. If you ever get stuck in BMO1, just go through your circle theorems, which ones haven't you used? It'll probably get you through the problem. Also, which condition in the question haven't you used? If you're stuck, reread the question. Also, If you finish the problem, and you haven't used a condition in the question, you've probably done it wrong unless they've been super mean and have put a red herring in (which they won't do for BMOs)
    Thank you, this is extremely helpful!
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    (Original post by abcdefghij1234)
    I wish I was as smart as you - you are so lucky!! I did the Cayley and, as I only answered 4 questions well, I know I've got merit! Really annoying as I was arguing with myself whether it was worth looking at a fifth question. I got a bronze JMC medal last year, so a bit annoying I haven't got another. Well, hopefully I'll do better in the Hamilton and BMOs!
    Thanks. To be doing an Olympiad at all is really good so you must be intelligent

    Yes, sometimes in exams you are just 'lucky' with the questions and everything goes to plan. However sometimes it doesn't. It's something you just have to hope will be in your favour.

    You've got loads of other opportunities to do well in future Olympiads and I'm sure you'll do well. Like I said in a previous post, practice is really essential. During the BMO time, all I did was understand what was likely to come in the exams through books (Geoff Smith, Anthony Gardiner and Andrew Jobbings). Then when I was comfortable with all that, I would look at questions and not have a clue what to do. After a couple of hours, I wouldn't have made much progress. Then, I'd look in the books for inspiration or just think a bit more. After a while of just keeping trying, everything clicks and you have this perceptual mathematical understanding of problems. (I am still really far off of this)

    If you can look at a question and just solve it, you know it's too easy. If you look at a question and spend hours trying to figure it out and make some progress, it's probably the right difficulty.

    Just keep doing maths and you'll get better

    Best of luck for the future
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    (Original post by BriannaTheBreeze)
    I want to do the BMOs next year, (couldn't this year for a variety of reasons), so what sort of stuff do you need to know, particularly geometry-wise? And whatever the marks you get, you'll still be in the prize category so I wouldn't worry too much. You always have next year to get a perfect score!
    Same here, next year i'll be in year 10, and am aiming for ~30 in the bmo. Ive got plane eucidean geomentry and the intro to number theorey books. If anyone wants to try "fun" olympiad problems, look here https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...6nxrtfNding4aw geomentry, and they've helped wsa=t&sourrct=j&url=http://ebook.sman1-s
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    Ok, that link didnt come out right, so here is the working link
    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...6nxrtfNding4aw
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    (Original post by A02)
    Same here, next year i'll be in year 10, and am aiming for ~30 in the bmo. Ive got plane eucidean geomentry and the intro to number theorey books. If anyone wants to try "fun" olympiad problems, look here https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...6nxrtfNding4aw geomentry, and they've helped wsa=t&sourrct=j&url=http://ebook.sman1-s
    Is that BMO1 or BMO2?
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    Bmo1, no way would i be able to get 30 in bmo2 in year 10
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    (Original post by A02)
    Bmo1, no way would i be able to get 30 in bmo2 in year 10
    Yeah, I was thinking that was a bit ambitious. 30 for BMO1 is a good and realistic target.

    Good luck
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    Thanks, which questions did you get marks for in the bmo1 last year maths465man?
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    (Original post by A02)
    Thanks, which questions did you get marks for in the bmo1 last year maths465man?
    10 marks for 1,2 and 4.
    4 marks for 3.
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    Well done! Thats a great score.
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    For the Intermediate Olympiads, how do you learn to do the geometry? I did well in the numerical stuff but skipped the shapes as they looked a) advanced and b) I was taking my time on the questions I could do. Are you just naturally incredibly good (obviously you are really good, or you wouldn't be in the Olympiad) or do you learn a load of tips or what? Had I been given an extra hour, I don't think I would have got more than 5 marks on the polygon question, and yet I did several past papers. I'm not stupid (I go to a normal comprehensive school and got about 30 points higher than anyone else in my year!) but cannot see how one can answer 6 such difficult (really, for me, 2 difficult and 4 mild) questions in 2 hours!
    Thanks
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    (Original post by abcdefghij1234)
    For the Intermediate Olympiads, how do you learn to do the geometry? I did well in the numerical stuff but skipped the shapes as they looked a) advanced and b) I was taking my time on the questions I could do. Are you just naturally incredibly good (obviously you are really good, or you wouldn't be in the Olympiad) or do you learn a load of tips or what? Had I been given an extra hour, I don't think I would have got more than 5 marks on the polygon question, and yet I did several past papers. I'm not stupid (I go to a normal comprehensive school and got about 30 points higher than anyone else in my year!) but cannot see how one can answer 6 such difficult (really, for me, 2 difficult and 4 mild) questions in 2 hours!
    Thanks
    I find the geometry questions easier, maybe that's just me, but the more you practice the better you get. There are a few rules and things you need to remember (e.g. how to prove similar triangles or things like the exterior angle of a triangle is the sum of the two other angles of the triangle, etc) but if you train your brain to spot different patterns or just little shapes you don't necessarily see at first glance, it's much, much easier to answer the question. Another little tip is, 99% of the time you will need to use all the information the question gives you, so I usually write down all of the information, no matter how obvious, onto a scrap piece of paper, and then I can work from there. It also really helps to draw on the diagram, for example putting dashes on the lines that are equal makes you find isosceles triangles or squares, etc. Also, even if the questions look intimidating, just give it a go! There's no harm in trying and it might be easier than you expected.

    Idk, this is just my experience, but I hope it helps
 
 
 
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