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    Can someone briefly describe the Translation stage of Protein Synthesis to me

    Having trouble condensing my notes down about it
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    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Can someone briefly describe the Translation stage of Protein Synthesis to me

    Having trouble condensing my notes down about it
    Just the translation process only? hope I am briefly as possible. Let's go!

    An amino acid is linked with tRNA. tRNA has an anticodon. This anticodon matches to the codon of the mRNA. The mRNA is like a 'strand' for a ribosome. After matching the anticodon of tRNA with the codon of mRNA, the ribosome is bound with an amino acid. The same procedure happens to another tRNAs which are linked with amino acids too. Thus another amino acids are bound with the ribosome - and amino acids with each other. During this procedure, tRNAs come off step by step, they are no longer bound with the ribosome. Thus the bounding amino acids separate from the ribosome as time goes by. When enough are bound with each other (say 20 up to 100 amino acids) the amino acids are completely separate from the ribosome. A new protein was created.

    And here is a picture to that.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Just the translation process only? hope I am briefly as possible. Let's go!

    An amino acid is linked with tRNA. tRNA has three anticodons. These three anticodons match to the codons of the mRNA. The mRNA is like a 'strand' for a ribosome. After matching anticodons of tRNA with the codons of mRNA, the ribosome is bound with an amino acid. The same procedure happens to another tRNAs which are linked with amino acids too. Thus another amino acids are bound with the ribosome - and amino acids with each other. During this procedure, tRNAs come off step by step, they are no longer bound with the ribosome. Thus the bounding amino acids separate from the ribosome as time goes by. When enough are bound with each other (say 20 up to 100 amino acids) the amino acids are completely separate from the ribosome. A new protein was created.

    And here is a picture to that.
    Careful.

    tRNA has three specific nucleotide bases that are called an anticodon.
    So each tRNA has only one anticodon.

    This codon is complementary to a specific codon on mRNA.


    Also I wouldn't particularly say the ribosome is bound to the amino acid. I would say the tRNA molecule carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome as it moves along the strand.
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    (Original post by RMNDK)
    Careful.

    tRNA has three specific nucleotide bases that are called an anticodon.
    So each tRNA has only one anticodon.

    This codon is complementary to a specific codon on mRNA.


    Also I wouldn't particularly say the ribosome is bound to the amino acid. I would say the tRNA molecule carries a specific amino acid to the ribosome as it moves along the strand.
    Of course, you are right. Yes, the anticodon consists of three nucleotide bases. As the order and combination of them are different to another anitcodons, every single tRNA has a specific anticodon. My careless mistake, sorry. So far, so good.

    Complementary in this case means that the nucleotides of mRNA match to the ones of tRNA, or am I wrong? have just prevent this term to be a bit cleaner in my explanation.

    Yeah, strictly speaking, the tRNA is bound with the ribosome only. But the tRNA is the 'link' between amino acid and ribosome for a while. From this point of view, amino acid is bound with ribosome indirectly too. Okay, it was not precisely enough in my explanation, I admit it.

    But hey, it is not so easy to describe such a complex thing like translation briefly (what was wished by the thread starter)!

    Nevertheless, thank you for your addition and attention. By the way you was the first member who has got my 7 reputation points! quite rightly in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Of course, you are right. Yes, the anticodon consists of three nucleotide bases. As the order and combination of them are different to another anitcodons, every single tRNA has a specific anticodon. So far, so good.

    Complementary in this case means that the nucleotides of mRNA match to the ones of tRNA, or am I wrong? have just prevent this term to be a bit cleaner in my explanation.

    Yeah, strictly speaking, the tRNA is bound with the ribosome only. But the tRNA is the 'link' between amino acid and ribosome for a while. From this point of view, amino acid is bound with ribosome indirectly too. Okay, it was not precisely enough in my explanation, I admit it.

    But hey, it is not so easy to describe such a complex thing like tranlation briefly (what was wished by the thread starter)!

    Nevertheless, thank you for your addition and attention. By the way you was the first member who has got my 7 reputation points! quite rightly in my opinion.
    Yes, complementary means the anticodon of tRNA will bind to the mRNA nucleotides as the bases correspond.

    BUT when you say "match", it's not that they are the same nucleotides, they are the paired nucleotides, i.e. A - U, C - G
    If that's what you meant anyway when you said match then woops I'm sorry


    And yay! What an honour!
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    (Original post by RMNDK)
    Yes, complementary means the anticodon of tRNA will bind to the mRNA nucleotides as the bases correspond.

    BUT when you say "match", it's not that they are the same nucleotides, they are the paired nucleotides, i.e. A - U, C - G
    If that's what you meant anyway when you said match then woops I'm sorry


    And yay! What an honour!
    Yeah, that is what I meant. My deepest apology to you. As a German, I have problems to find the right words to express the right meaning sometimes.
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    Thanks guys, this has helped me out alot!!! Especially that link to that diagram Kallisto!!
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    (Original post by Philip-flop)
    Thanks guys, this has helped me out alot!!! Especially that link to that diagram Kallisto!!
    Anytime. And good to know that I have picked the right diagramm out. There were so many of them about translation in protein synthesis stage.
 
 
 
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