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    (Original post by Ihonestlydk)
    I didn't say anything about it being a bad university or you actually doing Psychology, I was just pointing out and asking a question to the previous person who said you do Psychology at a bottom University hence why I asked those questions, disagreeing.
    yes i appreciate that honestly, but i have blocked that poster, so i can't actually see what nonsense he is coming out with. sorry to confuse you!!

    jr

    let's all be rich, buy yachts, and pretend that we all are getting firsts as an average for our degrees? What a good idea!!!!
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    I'd do loads
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    of cocaine
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    Political Ambassador
    People do not realise that many credit unions or organisations, especially the big ones, have their debt backed by the Government.

    If this dude decides to spend money he does not have on things he may probably not need, then you may well be picking the bill. For example, he finds that he cannot pay back the debt, so he defaults on the payment. The credit card company tries to collect the money owed. If they cannot, then they write it off as corporate debt. Due to the fact, they have more customers, they can continue to operate and borrow from big banks to cover their debt burden. These banks then accrue debt and seek bailout. You, the taxpayer through the Government, bail out the banks. So, in short, you have actually paid for this dude to spend money he did not have in the first place.

    Research the subprime mortgages and the credit bubble in the US that caused the financial credit crunch in 2008. People should be persuading him not to spend the money at all because you are indirectly paying for his lifestyle.

    If he can repay his debts without assistance, then it is good. If not, then everyone bears the brunt.
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    i would buy a very good computer with a lot of screens.
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    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    People do not realise that many credit unions or organisations, especially the big ones, have their debt backed by the Government.

    If this dude decides to spend money he does not have on things he may probably not need, then you may well be picking the bill. For example, he finds that he cannot pay back the debt, so he defaults on the payment. The credit card company tries to collect the money owed. If they cannot, then they write it off as corporate debt. Due to the fact, they have more customers, they can continue to operate and borrow from big banks to cover their debt burden. These banks then accrue debt and seek bailout. You, the taxpayer through the Government, bail out the banks. So, in short, you have actually paid for this dude to spend money he did not have in the first place.

    Research the subprime mortgages and the credit bubble in the US that caused the financial credit crunch in 2008. People should be persuading him not to spend the money at all because you are indirectly paying for his lifestyle.

    If he can repay his debts without assistance, then it is good. If not, then everyone bears the brunt.
    In the two years since i first had my credit card, i haven't defaulted once. Please lay off okay?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    pay off a grand of my student debt
    With credit card debt? Seems like an air tight financial plan to me.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    With credit card debt? Seems like an air tight financial plan to me.
    Well i have to get it down somehow? Plus the student debt is for life, but the credit card debt is only until i get a good job to pay it off? Good idea huh? See i told you i was full of them!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Well i have to get it down somehow? Plus the student debt is for life, but the credit card debt is only until i get a good job to pay it off? Good idea huh? See i told you i was full of them!
    I actually typed up what felt like an essay explaining how wrong that all is. But then I deleted it as you don't seem to take any advice well.

    So good luck on this terrible financial voyage you find yourself on.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Well i have to get it down somehow? Plus the student debt is for life, but the credit card debt is only until i get a good job to pay it off? Good idea huh? See i told you i was full of them!
    Gr8 b8 m8
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    (Original post by Mega0448)
    Stupid comment of the day goes to you.

    I have the money in my current account to pay for anything I need, but I choose to pay for it on my credit card. One because it's a much more secure way of buying things, and two I get cash back on the card.

    I pay my balance in full each month so I don't even incur any interest.

    'Dumb schmuck' indeed...
    Exactly. And it increases your credit score.

    I buy everything, literally everything with my credit card now.
    It's secure because if anything goes wrong, scam or whatever, the bank can sort it out because it is their money.
 
 
 
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