Being forced to sing christian songs in primary Watch

intelligent con
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does anyone else remember this back in primary or was it just my school? I found it incredibly sectarian and divisive to those from religious minorities who would either be forced to sign songs they did not believe in or simply not attend assemblies excluding them from everyone else. Why exactly do schools have to do that when they aren't even christian schools? Seems to me that they need to learn that this is now a multicultural country and at the time I was furious at them trying to indoctrinate us like they did. If we were to sing songs praising muhammed there would have been uproar.

Not sure if schools still do this but did any of you guys feel similarly about the situation when in primary?
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Blondie987
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He's got the whole world in his hands
He's got the whole wide world in his hands!

We had to go to church at the end of term every year from p1 to S6, people of other religions could opt out though
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Reue
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(Original post by intelligent con)
does anyone else remember this back in primary or was it just my school?
Yes, my primary forced all students to attend morning assembly during which religious songs and prayers were said.

(Original post by intelligent con)
Seems to me that they need to learn that this is now a multicultural country
No, they should learn that religion has no place in education.
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Kiytt
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I went to a Catholic primary school. I'm now atheist.

The fact that children are taught to believe the existence of God is fact before they even develop the cognitive capacity to critically think is abhorrent.
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Eternalflames
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I followed Hinduism until the age of 9 before leaving and having no religion, but I just sang the christian songs for the fun of it lol

When I saw this thread, I thought of this song:
Sing hosanna
Sing hosanna
Sing hosanna to the king of kings

Hahaha :lol:
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Axel Johann
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Something about "a candle in the dark" and "little lord Jesus"
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BefuddledPenguin
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Yes, I went to a regular state school too, it wasn't a faith school and this was before the days of the 'free' schools with a christian ethos. I used to sing 'dog' instead of 'god'.
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LordBerkut
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We used to sing 'and the trees of the fields will crap their pants, crap their pants, crap their pants' and 'cross over the road my friend, as the Lord is really bent', which was quite edgy humour back then.

I suppose there was quite a lot of churchy stuff going on, but it never did me any harm. I did used wonder why a girl called Zara got out of assemblies just because she was 'from Arabia'. I tried to say I was from Arabia but they wouldn't have it.
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Ravenous
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Didn't mind it in primary school, was quite annoying in Secondary though.
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JamesN88
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I've never really considered it before but it does seem like a semi-indoctrination now thinking back. We went to church a few times each term and said prayers and sang hymns in assembly in the morning.

Our Father

Thou fart in heaven

It certainly didn't work as I don't believe a word of that bullsh1t.
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Roofas
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(Original post by intelligent con)
does anyone else remember this back in primary or was it just my school? I found it incredibly sectarian and divisive to those from religious minorities who would either be forced to sign songs they did not believe in or simply not attend assemblies excluding them from everyone else. Why exactly do schools have to do that when they aren't even christian schools? Seems to me that they need to learn that this is now a multicultural country and at the time I was furious at them trying to indoctrinate us like they did. If we were to sing songs praising muhammed there would have been uproar.

Not sure if schools still do this but did any of you guys feel similarly about the situation when in primary?
It's not multicultural enough to sweep away hundreds of years of religious tradition. This country is still over 90% white outside of London and those ghastly northern cities.

I remember learning about Jewish holidays and diets and Indian holidays like Diwali. You're acting as though you've been abused. Get over it.
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WinterDucky
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I just remember the lyrics being put on the wall with those old projecters because nobody could remember the lyrics anyway. I didn't really understand the significance of them anyway.
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EdwardBarfield9
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I didn't think twice about it. I sang along because I enjoy singing even though I'm not great at it.
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JamesN88
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(Original post by Axel Johann)
Something about "a candle in the dark" and "little lord Jesus"
Away in a manger, no crib for a bed, the little lord Jesus, laid down his sweet head.


SING THAT SH*IT!!!
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16Characters....
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I remember this, I also remember being forced to memorise a rhyme summarising the Old Testament. This was a non-religious state school. Thought it was *******s then, still do.
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Shillary
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I am as atheist as they come and I actually really enjoyed signing hymns during (secular) primary school.


It fosters a community spirit and is just fun. :bubbles:
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joey11223
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Nah not for me, I think VERY occasionally but we visited a lot of different religious buildings (Mosque, Temple, etc) and singing wise one of the teachers played guitar so we'd sing things like Yellow Submarine, Oh my darling, Clementine etc. (the latter of which is a rather morbid song for little kids to sing in hindsight but back when you're young you don't take the lyrics in)
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sleepysnooze
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I went to public ("privately owned" )schools until year 4 and yeah, we were made to sing christian songs, although they weren't faith schools
not in state schools though...maybe I happened to live in a more secular area
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Terry Tibbs
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Gotta keep up that child indoctrination, wouldn't want their religion dying out now would they.
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Saoirse:3
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(Original post by Roofas)
It's not multicultural enough to sweep away hundreds of years of religious tradition. This country is still over 90% white outside of London and those ghastly northern cities.

I remember learning about Jewish holidays and diets and Indian holidays like Diwali. You're acting as though you've been abused. Get over it.
On the whole the country is 87% white though. There's a lot of variation however, in some areas it's virtually 100%, in others it's well below 50%. White, however, does not mean Christian. As of the 2011 census the percentage of the population that identifies as Christian was under 60% and falling. When you consider that a lot of Christians are likely older people who don't have school-age children, it's quite possible that already only a minority of primary school children come from Christian households. That doesn't mean we shouldn't teach about it, both as a major world religion and as a very important part of British history. It does mean that it's innappropriate to teach children that it is the "right" or default faith above all others, present the Bible as fact and encourage or coerce them to express Christian beliefs. I pay my taxes so children can be educated, not indoctrinated. And I say all this not as some kind of radical atheist but as a Christian woman myself.
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