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A2 Edexcel Geography 2016 Contested Planet/Geographical Research Watch

  • View Poll Results: What topics will you be picking for Unit 3?
    Energy Security
    213
    70.76%
    Water Conflicts
    172
    57.14%
    Biodiversity Under Threat
    114
    37.87%
    Bridging the Development Gap
    112
    37.21%
    The Technological Fix
    73
    24.25%

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    (Original post by mynamesmichael)
    Does anyone know why tech fix is always the least popular option? It seems like the most straightforward option
    its always biodiversity thats least popular at my school but thats because it links the least to all the other topics, maybe tech fix is less popular because all the other topics are problems and this is solutions so its different? idk
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    (Original post by lillyac)
    Hello,

    I also desperately need help with this since I've got none and have not been taught landscapes at all! Do you have any documents or info that could help? I would GREATLY APPRECIATE IT!! PLEASE help..
    Also, which landforms would you talk about? I saw the mark scheme from 2011 but I'm confused...am I supposed to talk about the types of plate boundaries as well??
    I am so lost...do you have any kind of structure or framework in mind?
    And which case studies?
    I am sorry for so many questions but I'm truly worried about this..
    thanks!
    In terms of what landscapes we've been through all the intrusive/extrusive igneous features: so sills, dykes, batholith, lacolith etc for intrusive (Geo Factsheet 270 is good); fumerols, geysers, Lava plateau etc for extrusive. You'll also want to look at the type of volcanic cone; strato-, shield- etc. and the type of plate boundary they are associated with. Also any other features that a type of plate boundary may form, such as fold mountains.
    Remember not to always look at volcanic and seismic activity in isolation: seismic can lead to volcanic through plate movements (think subduction/constructive margins). Hotspots are also important to remember - oceanic, such as Hawaii; continental, such as Yellowstone.

    Seismic-wise, we've been told to look at types of fault and types of folding.

    I think case studies will be hardest to put in for things like intrusive features (although batholith has the dartmoor one which isn't as bad), for volcanoes just have an example of each - if you know the formation of each type you'll just need an example of where. There will probably not be a lot to write about each case study, more just showing awareness of the process that form those landscapes.
    Haven't thought about framework yet, on the agenda soon.

    If anything doesn't make sense let me know.
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    (Original post by OrdinaryStudent)
    That will be great thanks!!
    PLAN
    Food supply inequality - natural, people and lifestyle
    Introduction
    Define food security
    What is the current position of food supply
    Food production increasing - but population outstriping (Malthus)
    Number of people overnourished surpassed undernourished
    Affluence
    Difficult to maintain food security:
    Peak oil
    Peak water
    Biofuel
    Half of people live in urban areas

    Natural causes of food insecurity
    Climate - too arid, too cold and roots cannot penetrate.
    Precipitation - generally more rain = good but flooding
    Length of growing season - longer = multiple harvests
    Shape of land = hillslopes not suitable for grazing, terraces, flood plains = v fertile
    Facing sun - more sunlight = more photosynthesis = increased yield
    Soil types - low = prone to desertification, high = produce high yield
    Natural hazard frequence - destroy food
    TECHNOLOGY CAN OVERCOME ALL OF THIS
    Case study = Bangladesh - Edexcel A2 Geography Textbook Paperback – 29 May 2009
    Dense population - coastal
    Vulnerable to hydrometeorological hazards - esp. w/ climate change

    Human causes of food insecurity
    Access to markets - rural africa = poor access, surplus cannot be sold, cannot access
    Land ownership - TNCs take over huge areas of land
    Inheritance laws - land passed through generations
    Government action and support - food reserves? Food stamps in Ethiopia, war.
    Urban e.g. Dhaka
    Rural
    Fastest growing megacity, strained by rural to urban migration.
    Poor live in slum housing (mainly):
    Dependent on others
    No secure income
    Often female headed
    Little education (cycle of poverty)
    Subsistence agriculture - land to farm and threat of natural hazards
    Landless poor must forage - which mechanisation and chemical decreased biodiversity.

    Lifestyle
    Convenience food agriculture
    More women working, less time to do cooking (traditional role of woman)
    More affordable to buy take away
    Families not eating together as much
    Pre-prepared meals available cheaply, for adults and children
    Children eat below WHO recommended amount of fruit and veg
    Diet poor if children are low socioeconomic status - eat more calorie dense food
    Nutrient model
    Obesity in USA - http://www.frac.org/html/hunger_in_t...hunger&obesity Obesity in USA
    Major public health problem
    Everyone is a risk/affected, but people most at risk are low income, food insecure as additional risk factors
    Stretch food budgets by buying energy dense foods - maximise calorie per dollar
    Contrast with China - textbook
    Development of a market economy and land reform - escaped famine and largely eliminated rural poverty
    Urbanisation and globalisation means increased affluence
    20% of overweight people are in China
    Why?
    Less exercise in factories
    Western influence in diet and lifestyle
    Changing diets due to increasing affluence (MEAT)
    History of famine - fatter people = happier and wealthier

    Conclusion
    Summarise points:
    Which creates food insecurity the most?
    What causes food insecurity - combination of factors?
    Future of food security?
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    (Original post by lillyac)
    I am sooooo grateful!thankssss 😄
    I'll find some of the videos I used for the features later
    • Thread Starter
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    (Original post by AlohaCharlotte)
    PLAN
    Food supply inequality - natural, people and lifestyle
    Introduction
    Define food security
    What is the current position of food supply
    Food production increasing - but population outstriping (Malthus)
    Number of people overnourished surpassed undernourished
    Affluence
    Difficult to maintain food security:
    Peak oil
    Peak water
    Biofuel
    Half of people live in urban areas

    Natural causes of food insecurity
    Climate - too arid, too cold and roots cannot penetrate.
    Precipitation - generally more rain = good but flooding
    Length of growing season - longer = multiple harvests
    Shape of land = hillslopes not suitable for grazing, terraces, flood plains = v fertile
    Facing sun - more sunlight = more photosynthesis = increased yield
    Soil types - low = prone to desertification, high = produce high yield
    Natural hazard frequence - destroy food
    TECHNOLOGY CAN OVERCOME ALL OF THIS
    Case study = Bangladesh - Edexcel A2 Geography Textbook Paperback – 29 May 2009
    Dense population - coastal
    Vulnerable to hydrometeorological hazards - esp. w/ climate change

    Human causes of food insecurity
    Access to markets - rural africa = poor access, surplus cannot be sold, cannot access
    Land ownership - TNCs take over huge areas of land
    Inheritance laws - land passed through generations
    Government action and support - food reserves? Food stamps in Ethiopia, war.
    Urban e.g. Dhaka
    Rural
    Fastest growing megacity, strained by rural to urban migration.
    Poor live in slum housing (mainly):
    Dependent on others
    No secure income
    Often female headed
    Little education (cycle of poverty)
    Subsistence agriculture - land to farm and threat of natural hazards
    Landless poor must forage - which mechanisation and chemical decreased biodiversity.

    Lifestyle
    Convenience food agriculture
    More women working, less time to do cooking (traditional role of woman)
    More affordable to buy take away
    Families not eating together as much
    Pre-prepared meals available cheaply, for adults and children
    Children eat below WHO recommended amount of fruit and veg
    Diet poor if children are low socioeconomic status - eat more calorie dense food
    Nutrient model
    Obesity in USA - http://www.frac.org/html/hunger_in_t...hunger&obesity Obesity in USA
    Major public health problem
    Everyone is a risk/affected, but people most at risk are low income, food insecure as additional risk factors
    Stretch food budgets by buying energy dense foods - maximise calorie per dollar
    Contrast with China - textbook
    Development of a market economy and land reform - escaped famine and largely eliminated rural poverty
    Urbanisation and globalisation means increased affluence
    20% of overweight people are in China
    Why?
    Less exercise in factories
    Western influence in diet and lifestyle
    Changing diets due to increasing affluence (MEAT)
    History of famine - fatter people = happier and wealthier

    Conclusion
    Summarise points:
    Which creates food insecurity the most?
    What causes food insecurity - combination of factors?
    Future of food security?
    Thank you so much!!
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    (Original post by HarryOsborne2471)
    In terms of what landscapes we've been through all the intrusive/extrusive igneous features: so sills, dykes, batholith, lacolith etc for intrusive (Geo Factsheet 270 is good); fumerols, geysers, Lava plateau etc for extrusive. You'll also want to look at the type of volcanic cone; strato-, shield- etc. and the type of plate boundary they are associated with. Also any other features that a type of plate boundary may form, such as fold mountains.
    Remember not to always look at volcanic and seismic activity in isolation: seismic can lead to volcanic through plate movements (think subduction/constructive margins). Hotspots are also important to remember - oceanic, such as Hawaii; continental, such as Yellowstone.

    Seismic-wise, we've been told to look at types of fault and types of folding.

    I think case studies will be hardest to put in for things like intrusive features (although batholith has the dartmoor one which isn't as bad), for volcanoes just have an example of each - if you know the formation of each type you'll just need an example of where. There will probably not be a lot to write about each case study, more just showing awareness of the process that form those landscapes.
    Haven't thought about framework yet, on the agenda soon.

    If anything doesn't make sense let me know.
    Thank you soooo much!!i am sooo grateful!!
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    Is anyone else finding revision for unit 3 a bit difficult? What textbooks is everyone using?
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    (Original post by HarryOsborne2471)
    I'll find some of the videos I used for the features later
    That would be great! thanks
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    (Original post by lillyac)
    Hello,

    I also desperately need help with this since I've got none and have not been taught landscapes at all! Do you have any documents or info that could help? I would GREATLY APPRECIATE IT!! PLEASE help..
    Also, which landforms would you talk about? I saw the mark scheme from 2011 but I'm confused...am I supposed to talk about the types of plate boundaries as well??
    I am so lost...do you have any kind of structure or framework in mind?
    And which case studies?
    I am sorry for so many questions but I'm truly worried about this..
    thanks!
    Okay, I'll try to give you a hand. I used this method for my mock in January, and it got an A* (not up my own ass, just letting you know the grade).

    Because it is a report you HAVE to have sub headings and diagrams. There's no way around that unfortunately, you also have to have a very strong conclusion.

    Introduction (just over 1 page)

    Rephrase the question, and give a brief introduction into the topic, i quickly spoke about Alfred Wegener who came up with continental drift theory in 1912. THIS SHOULD BE JUST 1 SENTENCE, it is not part of the question, but it gives the examiner the impression that you know your :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:. Because this is a report, you have to quote all references, a large chunk of your marks come from referencing, and make sure you have a wide range also (books to web to youtube vids). Then give some definitions that are related to the qestions, so tectonic boundaries or intrusive and extrusive. It doesn't matter what the definitions are aslong as they are related to the question and make sure you reference!!!!!!!!

    Then start a new paragraph "In this report..." then explain exactly what you are going to be talking about, and then give a quick introduction for the case studies you will be looking at. For example "For intrusive landforms, I shall be using Dartmoor, Isle of Arran and Wyoming National Park".

    Methodology and Sourcing (one page)

    This bit is simple and you can remember it before you go into the exam. But follow this design:

    Case Study Rationale Source Bias

    These should be your four headings and then all of your case studies underneath, in my mock I used 8 case studies to give you a rough idea. (3 intrusive, 3 extrusive, 2 from formations due to seismic activity).

    Analysis (this can be any length, i wrote 5 pages)
    I would split this section into 3 for the 3 areas of landforms you would be looking at. Then literally analyse them..give an introduction to which each one is, give a diagram of their formation, quote them, and then show how it gives a variety to each of the other case studies. This bit is the easy bit if you know what you're doing! AKA learn the case studies well!

    IT IS VITAL TO CONSTANTLY LINK BACK TO THE QUESTION AND MAKE SURE THAT YOU ALWAYS QUOTE...

    Conclusion (about a page)

    You literally conclude everything that you have talked about. Remember there is no new ideas that goes into the conclusion, make sure it is all summing up.

    I hope this gives a rough idea, if you have anymore questions then ask. Sorry for the long reply, I was in Amsterdam for a couple of days.

    You need to remember that this worked for me. It doesn't work for everyone, and the case studies are better if you find them yourself because you will remember them more efficiently. However, if you are really stuck I can give you some to research further.

    Hope this helps,
    Indigo X
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    (Original post by Indigo.Brownhall)
    Okay, I'll try to give you a hand. I used this method for my mock in January, and it got an A* (not up my own ass, just letting you know the grade).

    Because it is a report you HAVE to have sub headings and diagrams. There's no way around that unfortunately, you also have to have a very strong conclusion.

    Introduction (just over 1 page)

    Rephrase the question, and give a brief introduction into the topic, i quickly spoke about Alfred Wegener who came up with continental drift theory in 1912. THIS SHOULD BE JUST 1 SENTENCE, it is not part of the question, but it gives the examiner the impression that you know your :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin:. Because this is a report, you have to quote all references, a large chunk of your marks come from referencing, and make sure you have a wide range also (books to web to youtube vids). Then give some definitions that are related to the qestions, so tectonic boundaries or intrusive and extrusive. It doesn't matter what the definitions are aslong as they are related to the question and make sure you reference!!!!!!!!

    Then start a new paragraph "In this report..." then explain exactly what you are going to be talking about, and then give a quick introduction for the case studies you will be looking at. For example "For intrusive landforms, I shall be using Dartmoor, Isle of Arran and Wyoming National Park".

    Methodology and Sourcing (one page)

    This bit is simple and you can remember it before you go into the exam. But follow this design:

    Case Study Rationale Source Bias

    These should be your four headings and then all of your case studies underneath, in my mock I used 8 case studies to give you a rough idea. (3 intrusive, 3 extrusive, 2 from formations due to seismic activity).

    Analysis (this can be any length, i wrote 5 pages)
    I would split this section into 3 for the 3 areas of landforms you would be looking at. Then literally analyse them..give an introduction to which each one is, give a diagram of their formation, quote them, and then show how it gives a variety to each of the other case studies. This bit is the easy bit if you know what you're doing! AKA learn the case studies well!

    IT IS VITAL TO CONSTANTLY LINK BACK TO THE QUESTION AND MAKE SURE THAT YOU ALWAYS QUOTE...

    Conclusion (about a page)

    You literally conclude everything that you have talked about. Remember there is no new ideas that goes into the conclusion, make sure it is all summing up.

    I hope this gives a rough idea, if you have anymore questions then ask. Sorry for the long reply, I was in Amsterdam for a couple of days.

    You need to remember that this worked for me. It doesn't work for everyone, and the case studies are better if you find them yourself because you will remember them more efficiently. However, if you are really stuck I can give you some to research further.

    Hope this helps,
    Indigo X

    You are truly a LIFESAVER! Cant thank you enough!!
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    Guys any predictions by your teachers on Unit 3 Section B questions (Superpowers)??
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    (Original post by marchaprilmay)
    The pre-release is now out for June 2016 The Unit 3 focus is on Superpowers- 21st Century Superpowers: China and India. For Unit 4 I'm focusing on The World of Cultural Diversity which is Global Culture
    I am also doing Cultural Diversity for Unit 4! Dreading it to be honest!!! How do you feel about it?
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    Happy with the pre-release for both section B and unit 4. I'm doing BDG and Energy for section A.
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    (Other than pre release) is anyone just revising very in depth for 2 unit 3 topics? I am doing water and energy
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    (Original post by ombtom)
    Happy with the pre-release for both section B and unit 4. I'm doing BDG and Energy for section A.
    (Original post by Tom5pence)
    (Other than pre release) is anyone just revising very in depth for 2 unit 3 topics? I am doing water and energy
    Im doing water and energy, are you going to be revising a third topic as a back up?
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    (Original post by OrdinaryStudent)
    Im doing water and energy, are you going to be revising a third topic as a back up?
    I'm only going to revise two topics for section A.
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    (Original post by ombtom)
    I'm only going to revise two topics for section A.
    Really? How comes? I was told to revise 3 in case one question is very awkward.
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    (Original post by OrdinaryStudent)
    Really? How comes? I was told to revise 3 in case one question is very awkward.
    I tend to find if you revise really in depth, and thoroughly know every part of the spec for that topic, it is incredibly hard for them to ask you a difficult question. A awkward question may arise, but it has to be linked directly to the SPEC, so then again it is hard to get stuck if you have all the prior knowledge I have only just finished rewriting notes on energy security so I doubt I have that much time to revise 3 topics, as well as prepare for both pre release questions.
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    (Original post by Tom5pence)
    I tend to find if you revise really in depth, and thoroughly know every part of the spec for that topic, it is incredibly hard for them to ask you a difficult question. A awkward question may arise, but it has to be linked directly to the SPEC, so then again it is hard to get stuck if you have all the prior knowledge I have only just finished rewriting notes on energy security so I doubt I have that much time to revise 3 topics, as well as prepare for both pre release questions.
    Okay thanks I guess that makes sense

    What book did you use to make energy notes?
 
 
 
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