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    (Original post by jessedoell)
    Thanks for taking the time to reply! I hadn't even thought about the chances and advantages of either uni when it comes into entering the finance sector, so thanks for the insight. As I am doing engineering instead of an economics kind of degree, how far behind will this put me when/if I apply for an IB position? In terms of knowledge, employability, skills needed etc etc.
    Engineers are fine for finance. it's anecdotal evidence but all of my friends at UCL ChemE have gone into the finance sector, I'm friends with about 10-15% of the current class aswell so we're not talking 2-3 people (this is also where my opinions on UCLs ChemE come from lol).

    In fact me and those friends who are staying on to do an undergraduate MEng are going to be job/internship hunting together.

    tl;dr - engineering is fine for finance, never seen it hold someone from a target back, I think I read somewhere that banks like the diversity of places like UCL. (don't quote me on that though!)
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    (Original post by Bath_Student)
    Why even focus on IB? You are applying for engineering. Otherwise, take a gap year and study economics. If you want to do IB, do economics. Don't waste time in the engineering faculty. Don't you realise how unproductive it is to spend 4 years studying engineering just to want to do IB later?


    ....
    it's more about having the option, going to a target at least gives an increased chance of getting into finance, being in a target will also give more exposure to the industry so OP can be more informed on whether they want to do finance or not.

    Doing my undergrad at a semi-target I really regret not opting for the target now, hence my advice to OP (No personal agenda just regrets I don't want someone else to have).
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    it's more about having the option, going to a target at least gives an increased chance of getting into finance, being in a target will also give more exposure to the industry so OP can be more informed on whether they want to do finance or not.

    Doing my undergrad at a semi-target I really regret not opting for the target now, hence my advice to OP (No personal agenda just regrets I don't want someone else to have).
    aha, but if OP wants to do IB he MUST do economics or something intimately related. Bath is "only" a semi-target, so there's one disadvantage, coupled with his degree in engineering and not finance, econ or mathematics etc.

    If he's certain IB is his future, he should abandon chem eng. Sure, the option is great, but certainly only an option and most likely not his future path.
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    (Original post by Bath_Student)
    aha, but if OP wants to do IB he MUST do economics or something intimately related. Bath is "only" a semi-target, so there's one disadvantage, coupled with his degree in engineering and not finance, econ or mathematics etc.

    If he's certain IB is his future, he should abandon chem eng. Sure, the option is great, but certainly only an option and most likely not his future path.
    Engineers from targets make up a large chunk of graduate consultants/analysts. The notion that you need to study finance to work in finance is a misnomer.

    Nothing against semi-targets I went to one aswell, just as someone who like you initially thought all they wanted to do was engineering who was swayed to finance, I really regret not going to a target (I had the option of going to one), don't want OP to have these same regrets.

    Edit: Target to Semi-Target is a huge step down, Semi-target just means we're on the radar of employers in the sector.
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    Engineers from targets make up a large chunk of graduate consultants/analysts. The notion that you need to study finance to work in finance is a misnomer.

    Nothing against semi-targets I went to one aswell, just as someone who like you initially thought all they wanted to do was engineering that was swayed to finance, I really regret not going to a target (I had the option of going to one), don't want OP to have these same regrets.

    Edit: Target to Semi-Target is a huge step down, Semi-target just means we're on the radar of employers in the sector.
    Source requested.
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    (Original post by Bath_Student)
    Why even focus on IB? You are applying for engineering. Otherwise, take a gap year and study economics. If you want to do IB, do economics. Don't waste time in the engineering faculty. Don't you realise how unproductive it is to spend 4 years studying engineering just to want to do IB later?


    ....
    I'm not focusing on IB.. It's about considering ALL your options and what the course is going to give you overall. I am, like many, about to make one of the biggest financial investments of my life, so surely you can understand that I want to have as much knowledge as possible about the decision I'm going to make.
    Just because someone does a degree in something different to their professional career does not make it a waste of time. Brian May (lead guitarist of Queen) has a PhD in astrophysics. Despite the fact he isn't always gazing into the stars, I don't think he would call his degree a 'waste of time.'
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    Engineers are fine for finance. it's anecdotal evidence but all of my friends at UCL ChemE have gone into the finance sector, I'm friends with about 10-15% of the current class aswell so we're not talking 2-3 people (this is also where my opinions on UCLs ChemE come from lol).

    In fact me and those friends who are staying on to do an undergraduate MEng are going to be job/internship hunting together.

    tl;dr - engineering is fine for finance, never seen it hold someone from a target back, I think I read somewhere that banks like the diversity of places like UCL. (don't quote me on that though!)
    Ahh I see. Lol I have read some absolutely shocking reviews of the UCL Chem Eng department, completely put me off from applying there, could never understand why it was always rated so slowly despite UCL being a top uni.

    Are you currently doing your degree? Is it Chem eng?
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    (Original post by jessedoell)
    Thanks for taking the time to reply! I hadn't even thought about the chances and advantages of either uni when it comes into entering the finance sector, so thanks for the insight. As I am doing engineering instead of an economics kind of degree, how far behind will this put me when/if I apply for an IB position? In terms of knowledge, employability, skills needed etc etc.
    Not behind at all. In fact, you'd be ahead for some roles (mostly derivatives trading) where a better understanding of Maths is required. Economics is largely irrelevant to finance, it just so happens that a large proportion of those who want to go into finance are doing Econ. You'll be trained up for 2-3 months after uni with every other new start anyway.

    Obviously, do keep up with business news and make an effort to learn a bit more about finance in general - especially the roles, the key players, some technical knowledge - so you're in a good position for interviews. And of course, the usual of keeping yourself busy (extracurriculars) outside of school/uni work.
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    (Original post by jessedoell)
    Ahh I see. Lol I have read some absolutely shocking reviews of the UCL Chem Eng department, completely put me off from applying there, could never understand why it was always rated so slowly despite UCL being a top uni.

    Are you currently doing your degree? Is it Chem eng?
    It's not that bad (UCL ChemE), but there's a few hilarious stories about resits etc. that make me question the professionalism of the faculty.

    Completed my degree June 2015 was Petroleum Engineering (Chemical engineering with a bunch earth sciency modules e.g. Geochemistry instead of Physical Chemistry). Had no luck breaking into finance so starting my Masters at Imperial next year, so should you choose Imperial i'd see you there :P.
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    (Original post by Bath_Student)
    Why even focus on IB? You are applying for engineering. Otherwise, take a gap year and study economics. If you want to do IB, do economics. Don't waste time in the engineering faculty. Don't you realise how unproductive it is to spend 4 years studying engineering just to want to do IB later?


    ....
    Where is this obsession that you must do Economics coming from? The original poster can do whatever course they want and find interesting; an econ degree will not prepare them anymore than an engineering degree will. Plus, Engineering is probably one of the most versatile courses one can do.

    Anyway, your point is moot considering 70% of grad jobs in this country don't require a specific university subject. The VAST majority of graduates don't go into their field.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Not behind at all. In fact, you'd be ahead for some roles (mostly derivatives trading) where a better understanding of Maths is required. Economics is largely irrelevant to finance, it just so happens that a large proportion of those who want to go into finance are doing Econ. You'll be trained up for 2-3 months after uni with every other new start anyway.

    Obviously, do keep up with business news and make an effort to learn a bit more about finance in general - especially the roles, the key players, some technical knowledge - so you're in a good position for interviews. And of course, the usual of keeping yourself busy (extracurriculars) outside of school/uni work.
    That's good news to hear haha, so the skills are definitely transferrable.
    Thanks for the advice!
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    It's not that bad (UCL ChemE), but there's a few hilarious stories about resits etc. that make me question the professionalism of the faculty.

    Completed my degree June 2015 was Petroleum Engineering (Chemical engineering with a bunch earth sciency modules e.g. Geochemistry instead of Physical Chemistry). Had no luck breaking into finance so starting my Masters at Imperial next year, so should you choose Imperial i'd see you there :P.
    Nice! How long did you spend trying to break into finance? And if that didn't work out, what made you want to straight away do a masters before getting some work experience in the oil/gas engineering field?
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    (Original post by jessedoell)
    That's good news to hear haha, so the skills are definitely transferrable.
    Thanks for the advice!
    It's more a case of banks largely not caring what subject you do as they'll train everyone up.

    No probs.

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    (Original post by jessedoell)
    Nice! How long did you spend trying to break into finance? And if that didn't work out, what made you want to straight away do a masters before getting some work experience in the oil/gas engineering field?
    I was on an integrated masters so i'd be doing a masters anyway I just decided I would rather do my masters at a target university so cancelled the MEng went on to the BEng and decided I would apply to MScs at ICL/UC next year (this year). All this was a few weeks before graduation, serious last minute decision .

    I tried for about 6 months I was honestly way too late and at a semi-target to boot. When you start uni, regardless of where you choose to go - make sure you attend spring weeks etc in first year even if you don't wanna do finance, again its one of those just in case things.

    Regarding oil/gas engineering field, honestly i don't enjoy it at all the aspects I did like (risk analysis etc.) are covered in more detail by bankers lol.

    I would still like to be involved in the petroleum industry just the financial side of it.
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    Nothing is guaranteed.

    The fees at Imperial and living costs in London may become a large financial burden on you and your family.

    You may go to Bath in the hope of landing a good work experience in the City. This may not happen. You may attend Imperial hoping for the same and this may also not happen.

    The important thing for you is to attend a school where you feel you will gain a fantastic and complete education (academics, social and emotional). A place for you to be stretched and developed. If Bath will be the right place for you, then go there. If Imperial will support you in building the skills needed for an uncertain future, then proceed.

    Please don’t choose one or the other based on a future prospect that is not guaranteed. In the end, all you can do is to put your best leg forward in preparation for the future.
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    I was on an integrated masters so i'd be doing a masters anyway I just decided I would rather do my masters at a target university so cancelled the MEng went on to the BEng and decided I would apply to MScs at ICL/UC next year (this year). All this was a few weeks before graduation, serious last minute decision .

    I tried for about 6 months I was honestly way too late and at a semi-target to boot. When you start uni, regardless of where you choose to go - make sure you attend spring weeks etc in first year even if you don't wanna do finance, again its one of those just in case things.

    Regarding oil/gas engineering field, honestly i don't enjoy it at all the aspects I did like (risk analysis etc.) are covered in more detail by bankers lol.

    I would still like to be involved in the petroleum industry just the financial side of it.
    What's your view on unemployement for petroleum engineers considering you'll graduate next year ?
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    (Original post by GeologyMaths)
    What's your view on unemployement for petroleum engineers considering you'll graduate next year ?
    Brent's already rebounding, my investments in oil exploration companies have doubled. A masters will still be a prerequisite (it always has been for petroleum engineering positions) but finding a job in 2017-2018 for fresh masters students shouldn't be too difficult as oil will stabilizing. (BRENT has gone from $40 to $37 and will likely fall further, its not always as straightforward as analysts would like but i'm confident in this assessment of the situation)

    That being said my masters is in Metals and Energy Finance, so i've hedged my bets - I have the technical background to be a reservoir engineer but can (and hopefully will) move into upstream finance, using IB/consultancy as entry points.
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    For all those who insist one must read economics for a career in finance is sorely mistaken.

    Go to a reputable bookshop like Foyles or Waterstones and check out the finance section.

    Look for a book called Options, Futures And Other Derivs by John C Hull.

    That's the bible for entry level quants, in a field called FINANCIAL ENGINEERING!

    Maths and Physics grad / postgrads are more sought after in that area than any other subject.

    Alternatively, set up a linkedin account and see what those in an IB have studied.
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    I was on an integrated masters so i'd be doing a masters anyway I just decided I would rather do my masters at a target university so cancelled the MEng went on to the BEng and decided I would apply to MScs at ICL/UC next year (this year). All this was a few weeks before graduation, serious last minute decision .

    I tried for about 6 months I was honestly way too late and at a semi-target to boot. When you start uni, regardless of where you choose to go - make sure you attend spring weeks etc in first year even if you don't wanna do finance, again its one of those just in case things.

    Regarding oil/gas engineering field, honestly i don't enjoy it at all the aspects I did like (risk analysis etc.) are covered in more detail by bankers lol.

    I would still like to be involved in the petroleum industry just the financial side of it.
    Sounds interesting, will keep that advice in mind

    Ah I understand fair enough, best of luck!
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    (Original post by dugdugdug)
    For all those who insist one must read economics for a career in finance is sorely mistaken.

    Go to a reputable bookshop like Foyles or Waterstones and check out the finance section.

    Look for a book called Options, Futures And Other Derivs by John C Hull.

    That's the bible for entry level quants, in a field called FINANCIAL ENGINEERING!

    Maths and Physics grad / postgrads are more sought after in that area than any other subject.

    Alternatively, set up a linkedin account and see what those in an IB have studied.
    Cheers, will definitely take the time to check that book out!
 
 
 
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