Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Should older women have children? Watch

    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by loveleest)
    I said under 18. I think you missed the point what I said. I said that it it would be better for a 45 year old to have a baby rather than, for example- A 17 year old, that is still in full time education...

    Yeah, I agree. 45 may not be the "best age" but it isn't old and they shouldn't be stopped having any children.

    I am not close with any of my grandparents or great-grandparents and I am completely fine with that. There are other family that they could be close to, that they could do things with.
    Although my mother had me over 18, I still think I could've turned out ok if she had me at 17.

    There are family members yes but having more options is good, it is a good position to be in to have so many living relatives that you can choose who do things with. A lot of people I know seem to have almost no contact with 2nd cousins or family that is further away.

    Because of the fact we were all linked by our great-grandparent or whatever they were to them, I was able to keep in contact with these more distant relatives and actually see them quite often.
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dinasaurus)
    Although my mother had me over 18, I still think I could've turned out ok if she had me at 17.

    There are family members yes but having more options is good, it is a good position to be in to have so many living relatives that you can choose who do things with. A lot of people I know seem to have almost no contact with 2nd cousins or family that is further away.

    Because of the fact we were all linked by our great-grandparent or whatever they were to them, I was able to keep in contact with these more distant relatives and actually see them quite often.
    It is incredibly difficult for a 17 year old have a kid at that age. - It is better to have a child after 25 in my opinion- At that age, you are more financial stable, not really in full time education etc...
    They don't need to be in contact with every distant relative. They would be fine not being in contact with their great-grandparents.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Is it even possible to have a baby at that age?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    1st) Daily mail link :rolleyes:

    2nd) I care because? If a woman wants IVF then she should get it, some places are better than others. England certainly isn't great, so why shouldn't she go abroad for it? My mum did and she paid for it herself.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    1st) Daily mail link :rolleyes:

    2nd) I care because? If a woman wants IVF then she should get it, some places are better than others. England certainly isn't great, so why shouldn't she go abroad for it? My mum did and she paid for it herself.
    The source it still credible.

    Even if they are financially burdening the already strained NHS?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by loveleest)
    It is incredibly difficult for a 17 year old have a kid at that age. - It is better to have a child after 25 in my opinion- At that age, you are more financial stable, not really in full time education etc...
    They don't need to be in contact with every distant relative. They would be fine not being in contact with their great-grandparents.
    I was born to young parents and education wasn't really an issue, I was born in the hospital where my mother worked, her classmates even watched the operation.

    Finance isn't really dependant on age due to having grandparents, there wasn't really an issue.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blue_Mason)
    Now common sense would tell you about the greater risk of health complications that the child could inherit, and therefore I am against it.
    By older women I mean 45+
    My rule is if you cannot conceive a healthy and natural birth, then you should not give birth.
    One of my friends' mother had her when she was 47 years old. The mum had about 8 kids altogether and my mate was the youngest and the age gap between her and the eldest was about 31 years old (not joking at all)

    The mum was very healthy and so my mate was pretty healthy too when she was born. It depends on the health of the mum tbh.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    The source it still credible.

    Even if they are financially burdening the already strained NHS?
    As credible as it can be for Daily mail...

    Yeah, and so are people like this.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by theconfusedman)
    Yes people with downs syndrome can be happy, but its a very limited life.
    Perhaps, but if the woman wants to keep her child, that would be her right entirely. If they are told that their child will have Down's syndrome, they are given a lot of information about how to handle the condition and help that would be available to them, so they'd be well informed of the facts before they make a decision.

    You're being incredibly ignorant, I did say that if they 'strive' to have a child but did not work then i have nothing against them trying for a child in later life. You're not looking at the bigger picture.
    I'm ignorant? I'm not looking at the bigger picture? :laugh: You are the epitome of ignorant. Most women who have a child at 45 have probably been trying for a number of years. This accounts for the majority of women who have a child that late in life. So what exactly are you arguing if you have no problem with this situation? As long as they intended to have a child younger, you suddenly welcome disabled children?

    My basis for my opinion is that the unborn childs possible defects need to be considered in the decision. My opinion is perfectly valid and if you dont value it then idrc. I did acknowledge the possible advancement in technology that can decrease the risk but it is still very high at this point.
    I don't know if you're actually reading my replies or if you're just reading to respond. I said that all older women are aware of the increased risks and defects, yet they deem the benefit of becoming a mother to outweigh the possibility of having a child with a disability. It's not as if they are unbeknown to it.

    I dont see why you need to attack me like this, i can only assume that you are emotionally associated with this issue.
    No, not at all. Your comments lacked some depth and understanding which is why I responded.
    How am I attacking you?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Perhaps, but if the woman wants to keep her child, that would be her right entirely. If they are told that their child will have Down's syndrome, they are given a lot of information about how to handle the condition and help that would be available to them, so they'd be well informed of the facts before they make a decision.


    I'm ignorant? I'm not looking at the bigger picture? :laugh: You are the epitome of ignorant. Most women who have a child at 45 have probably been trying for a number of years. This accounts for the majority of women who have a child that late in life. So what exactly are you arguing if you have no problem with this situation? As long as they intended to have a child younger, you suddenly welcome disabled children?

    I don't know if you're actually reading my replies or if you're just reading to respond. I said that all older women are aware of the increased risks and defects, yet they deem the benefit of becoming a mother to outweigh the possibility of having a child with a disability. It's not as if they are unbeknown to it.


    No, not at all. Your comments lacked some depth and understanding which is why I responded.
    How am I attacking you?
    I love how you're arguing with me when im agreeing with you. Im just saying the unborn child's life and future has to be considered.

    'You are the epitome of ignorance' contradicts 'How am I attacking you?'

    Clearly you have some kind of emotional connection to this topic, thats why you are trying to defend yourself even though i agree with you.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Plenty of older women have healthy pregnancies and give birth to healthy children. The risks might be higher as you get older, but I don't think the figures for complications justify stopping women of a certain age from conceiving a child and carrying them to term. It's also worth noting that the first pregnancy a woman has is more at risk of complications (particularly pre-eclampsia) than future pregnancies, but it would be ridiculous to stop women having a first pregnancy because of that. Instead, we monitor those pregnancies and most of them end in the safe delivery of a healthy baby. The health service is there for a reason, and I think pregnancy and childbirth at whatever age is a better use of health resources than the resources that get wasted in A and E every weekend because people decide to go out and get pissed and enter into fights.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by theconfusedman)
    I love how you're arguing with me when im agreeing with you. Im just saying the unborn child's life and future has to be considered.

    'You are the epitome of ignorance' contradicts 'How am I attacking you?'

    Clearly you have some kind of emotional connection to this topic, thats why you are trying to defend yourself even though i agree with you.
    The unborn child's life is considered, that's the first thing I said to you when you were arguing that it's immoral to have a disabled child.

    I just said that I don't have any emotional connection to this topic

    You said I was attacking you before I made that comment...
    It was hypocritical anyway. You can't ask me why I'm attacking you when you said that I was incredibly ignorant)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    The unborn child's life is considered, that's the first thing I said to you when you were arguing that it's immoral to have a disabled child.
    As I said, I do totally agree with you!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    That sounds a bit Nazi-like..
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Well, the same can be said for men too, the quality of their sperm declines with age. So they are more likely to produce a child with health problems.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by FranScan97)
    That sounds a bit Nazi-like..

    How?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    I think the reference to Nazis is in relation to some one declaring that it's immoral to have a disabled child. I would agree that such a statement has nazi overtones. Who has the right to say such a thing?

    I followed this thread with a bit of interest. My mum was 41 when I was born. Dad 51. I've had a great life. Having established careers my parents have been able to provide me with a very high standard of living, the opportunity to participate in as many things as I've wanted to, and an excellent education. Basically I have wanted for nothing, neither physically nor emotionally. I have older siblings that are very caring and protective of me and so I'd say I got the whole package. Other than that it isn't for a bunch of students or folks living in ivory towers to dictate what other people should or should not do. It makes those that do sound like a bunch of sanctimonious, know it all d*cks
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
    Useful resources
    AtCTs

    Ask the Community Team

    Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

    Welcome Lounge

    Welcome Lounge

    We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.