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    Hey, I was taught this last week but am struggling to quite understand why, when for instance you add excess edta to copper (II) sulfate before adding NaOH(aq), you don't form a precipitate, whereas if you didn't add edta, but just copper (II) sulfate and NaOH(aq), you would get a blue solution.

    Explanations are much appreciated! Thanks
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    (Original post by Funky_Giraffe)
    Hey, I was taught this last week but am struggling to quite understand why, when for instance you add excess edta to copper (II) sulfate before adding NaOH(aq), you don't form a precipitate, whereas if you didn't add edta, but just copper (II) sulfate and NaOH(aq), you would get a blue solution.

    Explanations are much appreciated! Thanks
    EDTA forms a very stable complex with Copper, so the EDTA cannot be displaced by hydroxide ions. This is an example of the chelate effect.

    In addition to this the Cu-N bonds are stronger than Cu-O because of the reduced electronegativity of nitrogen and therefore better energy matching.
 
 
 
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