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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yep, I wouldn't necessarily go by YT vids. The CSAT is now a key part of the process for Cambridge.
    https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/admissions/...missions-test/

    And the source for your assertion that Oxford value the interview above everything else?

    Perhaps gavinlowe could comment?
    That's the impression I got when I was going through.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yep, I wouldn't necessarily go by YT vids. The CSAT is now a key part of the process for Cambridge.
    https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/admissions/...missions-test/

    And the source for your assertion that Oxford value the interview above everything else?

    Perhaps gavinlowe could comment?
    I consider the interviews the most reliable indicator of a candidate's potential, and so it's the one I put most emphasis on (but the phrase "above everything else" is a bit of an exaggeration). I see the MAT primarily as a shortlisting tool: we shortlist about three candidates for every place, so that we have time to give each shortlisted candidate several interviews. But it certainly also provides some input into final decisions.

    I've no idea whether Oxford or Cambridge interviews are harder.

    Gavin
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    (Original post by gavinlowe)
    I consider the interviews the most reliable indicator of a candidate's potential, and so it's the one I put most emphasis on (but the phrase "above everything else" is a bit of an exaggeration). I see the MAT primarily as a shortlisting tool: we shortlist about three candidates for every place, so that we have time to give each shortlisted candidate several interviews. But it certainly also provides some input into final decisions.

    I've no idea whether Oxford or Cambridge interviews are harder.

    Gavin
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    (Original post by gavinlowe)
    I consider the interviews the most reliable indicator of a candidate's potential, and so it's the one I put most emphasis on (but the phrase "above everything else" is a bit of an exaggeration). I see the MAT primarily as a shortlisting tool: we shortlist about three candidates for every place, so that we have time to give each shortlisted candidate several interviews. But it certainly also provides some input into final decisions.

    I've no idea whether Oxford or Cambridge interviews are harder.

    Gavin
    What are the chances for somebody reapplying after getting rejected by Oxford (specifically for Maths)?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yep, I wouldn't necessarily go by YT vids. The CSAT is now a key part of the process for Cambridge.
    https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/admissions/...missions-test/

    And the source for your assertion "Oxford value the interview above all else"?

    Perhaps gavinlowe could comment?
    As feedback from Jesus college, Oxford for History and Politics I was told that this was why I had not received an offer. Upon badgering the Admissions officer for more info I was told that I was pipped at the interview stage by someone who scored 69 on the HAT and 7.0 average on interviews; whereas I scored 77 on the HAT and 6.5 on interviews as they said that more emphasis was placed on the interviews ( I assume that this equates to the comment above as I would think HAT was more important than PS and written work to secure a place).
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    (Original post by Abscissa)
    What are the chances for somebody reapplying after getting rejected by Oxford (specifically for Maths)?
    It's not really possible to answer that question directly. (I assume you're now considering applying for Computer Science.)

    I think that nowadays it's just as hard to get a place for Computer Science as for Mathematics. If your rejection for Mathematics was borderline, then you might have a reasonable chance. The qualities we're looking for in the two subjects are similar, but not identical: if you're better at the type of mathematics relevant for Computer Science (e.g. discrete maths, logical thinking) than more traditional mathematics (e.g. calculus, geometry) then that will give you an advantage. And we'd also want to see a genuine interest in the subject, of course.

    Gavin
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    (Original post by gavinlowe)
    It's not really possible to answer that question directly. (I assume you're now considering applying for Computer Science.)

    I think that nowadays it's just as hard to get a place for Computer Science as for Mathematics. If your rejection for Mathematics was borderline, then you might have a reasonable chance. The qualities we're looking for in the two subjects are similar, but not identical: if you're better at the type of mathematics relevant for Computer Science (e.g. discrete maths, logical thinking) than more traditional mathematics (e.g. calculus, geometry) then that will give you an advantage. And we'd also want to see a genuine interest in the subject, of course.

    Gavin
    How much better would a reapplicant be expected to do in the MAT compared to a normal applicant, generally?
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    (Original post by Abscissa)
    How much better would a reapplicant be expected to do in the MAT compared to a normal applicant, generally?
    I'd expect somebody applying post-A Levels to do 5-10 marks better than somebody applying pre-A Levels, on the grounds that they have studied an extra year of Mathematics. Note that I consider the pre- or post-A Level distinction to be more relevant than whether you've applied before.

    Gavin
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    (Original post by looktoyourright)
    That's good but there's no chance I will be getting A*A*A predicted I don't think I can only get 1 A* predicted
    If it helps, my old college in their reference said they couldn't really predict me A*A*A because I no longer studied there and I got an offer. They also added that I was confident I'd achieve those grades.
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    (Original post by gavinlowe)
    I'd expect somebody applying post-A Levels to do 5-10 marks better than somebody applying pre-A Levels, on the grounds that they have studied an extra year of Mathematics. Note that I consider the pre- or post-A Level distinction to be more relevant than whether you've applied before.

    Gavin
    Thanks for the information Gavin. I'll be applying again this year, for straight mathematics. Would you say that post-A level applicants are on even ground with pre-A level applicants? Sure, they will be expected to perform better, but they will also have their (hopefully) good A2 grades.
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    Very hard. The application statistics speak for themselves. Be realistic about your chances of getting into Oxford and make sure you have other choices that are less difficult to get into so you don't end up with a slate of rejections on UCAS.

    Best of luck
 
 
 
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