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    (Original post by KK.Violinist)
    Personally Bartlett if I can get the grades required. I know a friend who applied for AA but the thing is her parents also don't want her to go because she plans on going to China to work. According to her, AA is not that well known there and sometimes not even considered compared to the prestigious universities like Cambridge, UCL, etc. So it really depends on where you want to work in the future. I'm assuming it's not really considered because of the fact that it's not actually an uni?
    ah i see
    thts strange
    cus ppl around me kno AA more than the Bartlett
    I also inquired some of the graduate skls in the US and they told me the graduation certi with RIBA part1 they accept students from the AA cus they kno the RIBA course at the AA is tough

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    (Original post by KK.Violinist)
    Personally Bartlett if I can get the grades required. I know a friend who applied for AA but the thing is her parents also don't want her to go because she plans on going to China to work. According to her, AA is not that well known there and sometimes not even considered compared to the prestigious universities like Cambridge, UCL, etc. So it really depends on where you want to work in the future. I'm assuming it's not really considered because of the fact that it's not actually an uni?
    Perhaps not compared to Cambridge (China really loves that), but I wouldn't say that AA is less prestigious than Bartlett. I know a Chinese architect who told me that AA is better.
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    I have been watching this thread for some time. I also have offers to study architecture but I wonder if anybody else is aware of the stress and mental health problems affecting architecture students in the UK. According to the Architects Journal 2016 annual student survey 26 per cent of students said they were receiving or had received medical help for mental health problems resulting from their course, while a further 26 per cent feared they would have to seek professional help in the future. Overall, more than half of students expressed concerns about their mental health in some way. Even university staff are noticing the emotional strain of architecture education on their students and the head of the Bartlett recently spoke publicly about the problem. If you google "architecture student stress" you will freak out. Are you guys aware of this problem and happy to live with it?
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    (Original post by bbglop)
    Perhaps not compared to Cambridge (China really loves that), but I wouldn't say that AA is less prestigious than Bartlett. I know a Chinese architect who told me that AA is better.
    tht is wht i thought as well
    plus aa might start giving out an actual degree to students starting to graduate from this yr round.
    but this is only if the skl oasses the audit

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    (Original post by twenty16app)
    tht is wht i thought as well
    plus aa might start giving out an actual degree to students starting to graduate from this yr round.
    but this is only if the skl oasses the audit

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    are they not giving out degrees now?
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    (Original post by EmmaNuel8)
    are they not giving out degrees now?
    they have the equivalent but wasnt official
    im not too sure
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    (Original post by jfellow)
    I have been watching this thread for some time. I also have offers to study architecture but I wonder if anybody else is aware of the stress and mental health problems affecting architecture students in the UK. According to the Architects Journal 2016 annual student survey 26 per cent of students said they were receiving or had received medical help for mental health problems resulting from their course, while a further 26 per cent feared they would have to seek professional help in the future. Overall, more than half of students expressed concerns about their mental health in some way. Even university staff are noticing the emotional strain of architecture education on their students and the head of the Bartlett recently spoke publicly about the problem. If you google "architecture student stress" you will freak out. Are you guys aware of this problem and happy to live with it?
    Is this unique to Architecture? I know that Architecture courses tend to demand long hours, but I think this is a common problem. See https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ays-nus-survey for example
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    (Original post by thewinelake)
    Is this unique to Architecture? I know that Architecture courses tend to demand long hours, but I think this is a common problem. See https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ays-nus-survey for example
    The problem seems to be serious in Architecture. Here is the Architects Journal's article on the survey. https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/...009173.article
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    (Original post by thewinelake)
    Is this unique to Architecture? I know that Architecture courses tend to demand long hours, but I think this is a common problem. See https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...ays-nus-survey for example
    From what I've seen (with surveys on Dezeen, Archdaily and mainstream media etc), Architecture is worse than average in terms of the toll it takes on mental health and stress. It has also consistently been found to be the most time-consuming course. That being said, being aware of these issues and understanding how the course might affect oneself, it puts you in a better position to function on the course; knowing that others will be finding the course hard and suffering from mental health problems means that you won't simply internalise any issues, and knowing how to reach out, possibly to medical experts, can also help.

    Ultimately, when considering any course all these factors need to be considered. For those of us who want to go into architecture/design, raised levels of stress and mental health issues may simply be something that is inevitable; personally, I would rather go into a course I know I will enjoy however will find difficult at times, rather than go into a course that I will not find to be hard, nor leave me at risk of mental health issues, but then will also find boring
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    Has anyone else who had their UCL interview on the 30th of November not heard anything yet?
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    (Original post by curlyheadedbean)
    Has anyone else who had their UCL interview on the 30th of November not heard anything yet?
    Oh boy, that wasn't now.

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    (Original post by jfellow)
    I have been watching this thread for some time. I also have offers to study architecture but I wonder if anybody else is aware of the stress and mental health problems affecting architecture students in the UK. According to the Architects Journal 2016 annual student survey 26 per cent of students said they were receiving or had received medical help for mental health problems resulting from their course, while a further 26 per cent feared they would have to seek professional help in the future. Overall, more than half of students expressed concerns about their mental health in some way. Even university staff are noticing the emotional strain of architecture education on their students and the head of the Bartlett recently spoke publicly about the problem. If you google "architecture student stress" you will freak out. Are you guys aware of this problem and happy to live with it?
    I even await the stress as I perform much better under pressure. And also, as we here on tsr are an ambitious community, I believe we already worked harder on our applications than the others - well preparing for the courses. And as they said before me: a stressing course means one that is pushing your limits, and that is how we learn. Rather a hard subject than a bornig one.

    Frankly, I guess it only prepares us to the actual profession. Be honest: this is a competitive business we have chosen, won't be easy. But will surely be fun, challenging and rewarding.

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    (Original post by bbglop)
    I just ended up writing the same amount as my UCAS one, don't know if that's good or bad ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    (Original post by KK.Violinist)
    Nope, no word limit. The only thing they said is that it has to fit in the form they give you which is roughly 3/4 of blank page.
    wait, they want it to fit into the rest of the 'form' page? In what they've sent me only 1/2 a page is available
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    (Original post by GrétaPanna)
    I even await the stress as I perform much better under pressure. And also, as we here on tsr are an ambitious community, I believe we already worked harder on our applications than the others - well preparing for the courses. And as they said before me: a stressing course means one that is pushing your limits, and that is how we learn. Rather a hard subject than a bornig one.

    Frankly, I guess it only prepares us to the actual profession. Be honest: this is a competitive business we have chosen, won't be easy. But will surely be fun, challenging and rewarding.

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    I guess you do need a lot of passion, but even that may not be enough for some of us. This tsr thread from 2008 is very revealing (and since then things do not seem to have improved): "What depresses me most is the fact that we are led to believe that the course is a good fertile growing ground for our creativity; for gaining a sense of things - the reality is very different - You have every bit of creativity diluted out of you until you are nothing but processed cheese - by the end you have no flavour." https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...d.php?t=565988

    You will find loads of similar testimonies online if you bother to look. It seems that architecture tutors are stuck in an old school mentality of studio culture that favours the survival of the fittest and takes the cut throat approach to any student that shows a trace of weakness. Perhaps good for some but probably not for me.
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    (Original post by jfellow)
    I guess you do need a lot of passion, but even that may not be enough for some of us. This tsr thread from 2008 is very revealing (and since then things do not seem to have improved): "What depresses me most is the fact that we are led to believe that the course is a good fertile growing ground for our creativity; for gaining a sense of things - the reality is very different - You have every bit of creativity diluted out of you until you are nothing but processed cheese - by the end you have no flavour." https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...d.php?t=565988

    You will find loads of similar testimonies online if you bother to look. It seems that architecture tutors are stuck in an old school mentality of studio culture that favours the survival of the fittest and takes the cut throat approach to any student that shows a trace of weakness. Perhaps good for some but probably not for me.
    Did you find this out after you've applied? If so, maybe you would want to consider changing your course?
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    (Original post by EmmaNuel8)
    wait, they want it to fit into the rest of the 'form' page? In what they've sent me only 1/2 a page is available
    some people just wrote 1/2 a page. I wrote 4000 characters (1 page).
    It's probably up to you.
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    (Original post by poopiepie)
    Did you find this out after you've applied? If so, maybe you would want to consider changing your course?
    You mean that the course is not a good fertile growing ground for creativity and that you have every bit of creativity diluted out of you until you are nothing but processed cheese? I obviously did not know that when I applied. I am already considering taking a gap year and applying to a different course next year. I guess I was hoping somebody here would convince me that things are different and that I should stick to architecture
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    (Original post by jfellow)
    I guess you do need a lot of passion, but even that may not be enough for some of us. This tsr thread from 2008 is very revealing (and since then things do not seem to have improved): "What depresses me most is the fact that we are led to believe that the course is a good fertile growing ground for our creativity; for gaining a sense of things - the reality is very different - You have every bit of creativity diluted out of you until you are nothing but processed cheese - by the end you have no flavour." https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...d.php?t=565988

    You will find loads of similar testimonies online if you bother to look. It seems that architecture tutors are stuck in an old school mentality of studio culture that favours the survival of the fittest and takes the cut throat approach to any student that shows a trace of weakness. Perhaps good for some but probably not for me.
    tbh I don't think it is that bad; you will always find people complaining about the workload in every single course. I personally know a few people studying arch, all of them say its hard but they also say they're enjoying it (which is the main thing).

    I also hesitated for quite a while whether to apply or not because I am not that passionate about buildings and art. However I decided to give it a try; if it doesn't work out, I can always switch to another course after the first semester.
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    (Original post by jfellow)
    You mean that the course is not a good fertile growing ground for creativity and that you have every bit of creativity diluted out of you until you are nothing but processed cheese? I obviously did not know that when I applied. I am already considering taking a gap year and applying to a different course next year. I guess I was hoping somebody here would convince me that things are different and that I should stick to architecture
    I think you should give it a chance, if you don't enjoy it, you can always switch 😊
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    (Original post by poopiepie)
    I think you should give it a chance, if you don't enjoy it, you can always switch 😊
    Thank you for the support.
 
 
 
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