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Which country is the most protected from natural disasters? watch

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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    There are plenty of other catastrophic risks we can worry about instead
    Oh, I agree.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    How is Britain at risk of tsunami?
    Asteroid into the North Sea/Atlantic?
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    The geological evidence suggests that these collapses occur in many little stages over longer periods of time, it is unlikely that it would result in some biblical catastrophic collapse. There are plenty of other catastrophic risks we can worry about instead
    What like?
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    (Original post by Lady Comstock)
    Asteroid into the North Sea/Atlantic?
    I was thinking a catastrophic Icelandic eruption or something Yellowstoney or other 'super eruptions'
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    What like?
    Have a look at this.
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    I think you sent me the wrong link?
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    I think you sent me the wrong link?
    Multistage collapse of eight western Canary Island landslides in the last 1.5Ma?
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    Multistage collapse of eight western Canary Island landslides in the last 1.5Ma?
    "since multistage failures will likely reduce the size of individual tsunami waves. Furthermore, the basal subunits typically contain altered volcanic glasses and high carbonate content indicative of materials failed from the submarine flanks of the islands. The incorporation of submarine flank sectors into the landslides is also important, since this also acts to further reduce tsunamigenesis. However, although reduced in volume due to multistage failure mechanism, the volume of these separate failures are still substantial (10–100 km3) and capable of causing significant tsunamis near to source"
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    "since multistage failures will likely reduce the size of individual tsunami waves. Furthermore, the basal subunits typically contain altered volcanic glasses and high carbonate content indicative of materials failed from the submarine flanks of the islands. The incorporation of submarine flank sectors into the landslides is also important, since this also acts to further reduce tsunamigenesis. However, although reduced in volume due to multistage failure mechanism, the volume of these separate failures are still substantial (10–100 km3) and capable of causing significant tsunamis near to source"
    I don't think 4000km away counts as "near to source". Particularly since Britain is partially sheltered by the Iberian Peninsula. This paper downgrades the estimated amount of debris by 300% from previous papers that suggested a serious risk to Britain.
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I don't think 4000km away counts as "near to source". Particularly since Britain is partially sheltered by the Iberian Peninsula.
    Exactly? So why would we need to worry?

    Sorry, I wasn't asking for evidence I agreed with you. I was asking what other things we should worry about.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    Exactly? So why would we need to worry?
    We don't need to worry, that's my point...
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    We don't need to worry, that's my point...
    See edit
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    Hong Kong and Macau if you count autonomous territories. Also the Vatican City and maybe South Korea.

    I agree with Singapore.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    See edit
    Oh right, sorry! Well, a great compilation of essays called Global Catastrophic Risk (Bostrom & Circovic) gives a pretty comprehensive summary of the various potential catastrophic risks facing humanity. The general consensus seems to be that anthropogenic risks are likely to have (by far) the greatest catastrophic potential (particularly pandemics and war, although it also has some very interesting treatments on artificial intelligence [although I went to a lecture recently that basically disputed everything the book wrote about that], nanotechnology and biosecurity). It's a really fun book to read, would definitely recommend it (taking things with a pinch of salt because some of the stuff in it isn't necessarily the mainstream view).
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    (Original post by Lady Comstock)
    It would need to be a country far from a fault line, not near an ocean (so not susceptible to tsunami/flooding), not prone to draught, less susceptible to hurricanes, no big volcanos, not susceptible to harsh winters, etc.

    I think Britain loses on the tsunami/flooding front.

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