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    Hi, I'm wondering about the differences between CertHE, Access to HE and foundation years.

    I'm hoping to get into a good university to study History after sort of failing A Levels (came out with an A in Sociology and a D in History) due to health issues, and was pretty set on a Humanities Access to HE course, until I found out about Cert of HE and Durham's foundation years.

    I'd ruled out foundation years before because I couldn't find many of them and I often didn't meet the entry requirements due to having only two A Levels. But then I happened to come across Durham's foundation years (which don't seem to show up on the UCAS foundation course search tool?) and saw that they require 'no formal qualifications'. This seems too good to be true, and I'm wondering if they expect applicants to have a lot of relevant work experience?

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone knows what the differences between these 3 options are in terms of workload, difficulty, price, and most importantly how they are perceived by universities?

    Also, would a Cert of HE done at the Open University be seen as the same as one done at an actual university?

    Sorry for all the questions haha!
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    (Original post by boopityboop)
    Hi, I'm wondering about the differences between CertHE, Access to HE and foundation years.

    I'm hoping to get into a good university to study History after sort of failing A Levels (came out with an A in Sociology and a D in History) due to health issues, and was pretty set on a Humanities Access to HE course, until I found out about Cert of HE and Durham's foundation years.

    I'd ruled out foundation years before because I couldn't find many of them and I often didn't meet the entry requirements due to having only two A Levels. But then I happened to come across Durham's foundation years (which don't seem to show up on the UCAS foundation course search tool?) and saw that they require 'no formal qualifications'. This seems too good to be true, and I'm wondering if they expect applicants to have a lot of relevant work experience?

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone knows what the differences between these 3 options are in terms of workload, difficulty, price, and most importantly how they are perceived by universities?

    Also, would a Cert of HE done at the Open University be seen as the same as one done at an actual university?

    Sorry for all the questions haha!
    Cert HE is the first year of a degree, OU is more or less the same as an actual uni, but each course differs at each uni so if you want to use it to get into another uni you need to check your modules are compatible. By doing the Cert HE you will lose 1 year of full time funding for your new course though, because it's higher education.

    Access to HE, as in the title gives you access to HE courses.

    Foundation years are normally attached to and tailored towards the degree they lead onto so aren't generally transferable. Again you'll probably lose 1 year of funding if you do one and want to transfer to a different uni.

    Costs vary between colleges and uni's OU is cheaper than conventional uni.

    Ask the admission department for the course you want to do specific questions, they're the ones who will decide on whether to give you a place or not.
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    (Original post by boopityboop)
    Hi, I'm wondering about the differences between CertHE, Access to HE and foundation years.

    I'm hoping to get into a good university to study History after sort of failing A Levels (came out with an A in Sociology and a D in History) due to health issues, and was pretty set on a Humanities Access to HE course, until I found out about Cert of HE and Durham's foundation years.

    I'd ruled out foundation years before because I couldn't find many of them and I often didn't meet the entry requirements due to having only two A Levels. But then I happened to come across Durham's foundation years (which don't seem to show up on the UCAS foundation course search tool?) and saw that they require 'no formal qualifications'. This seems too good to be true, and I'm wondering if they expect applicants to have a lot of relevant work experience?

    Anyway, I was wondering if anyone knows what the differences between these 3 options are in terms of workload, difficulty, price, and most importantly how they are perceived by universities?

    Also, would a Cert of HE done at the Open University be seen as the same as one done at an actual university?

    Sorry for all the questions haha!
    Hey there

    Just wondering, What courses are you interested in? Taking a foundation degree would be helpful if you're still unsure or confused. I would recommend you to email [email protected] if you're concern about the requirement grades as they will help you out. By the way, Ravensbourne is a digital media and design university that also offers pre foundation and foundation degree. Check us out! click here

    I wish you luck
    Ahlia
 
 
 

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