Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

I picked the wrong subject... really really regretting it now... Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I started studying Psychology at uni last year, I didn't like my uni so I transferred to another one, but I had to start from first year again because the modules I had previously studied were not similar enough.

    Anyway, now I am just regretting this subject choice all together... I wish I picked something more "sciencey" like biomed because thats what I am good at... not subjects based on literature and essay writing...

    Biology was my fav subject in terms of the fact I found it so easy, Psychology I found hard but enjoyed more than biology, but I am not interested in just studying biology and I have gotten to know quite a few biomed students and tbh I prefer the sound of this subject way more..... plus I feel like i am not going to get anywhere with this degree regardless of the fact it will come from a very prestigious university.

    If I were to switch subjects, I'd be 2 years older than everyone on my course lol and will have had 2 years of university behind me but still at first year? :/ Don't know if its worth it and I am honestly hating my course
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PsychPrincess)
    I started studying Psychology at uni last year, I didn't like my uni so I transferred to another one, but I had to start from first year again because the modules I had previously studied were not similar enough.

    Anyway, now I am just regretting this subject choice all together... I wish I picked something more "sciencey" like biomed because thats what I am good at... not subjects based on literature and essay writing...

    Biology was my fav subject in terms of the fact I found it so easy, Psychology I found hard but enjoyed more than biology, but I am not interested in just studying biology and I have gotten to know quite a few biomed students and tbh I prefer the sound of this subject way more..... plus I feel like i am not going to get anywhere with this degree regardless of the fact it will come from a very prestigious university.

    If I were to switch subjects, I'd be 2 years older than everyone on my course lol and will have had 2 years of university behind me but still at first year? :/ Don't know if its worth it and I am honestly hating my course
    If you enjoy psych more stick with it.

    Cleanse your mind from envy of others being 2 years ahead of you as that is irrelevant and only your journey matters.

    If you're hating your course quit it.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PsychPrincess)
    I started studying Psychology at uni last year, I didn't like my uni so I transferred to another one, but I had to start from first year again because the modules I had previously studied were not similar enough.

    .....

    If I were to switch subjects, I'd be 2 years older than everyone on my course lol and will have had 2 years of university behind me but still at first year? :/ Don't know if its worth it and I am honestly hating my course
    You'll probably find that it isn't financially possible.

    You don't have enough Student Finance entitlement left, to start a third degree from scratch. Everyone gets a 'grace' year of funding in case they start out at the wrong uni or on the wrong course - you have already used yours.

    If you want to start another new degree from year one, you would have to pay for the first year yourself (including tuition fees). Your SF support would only kick in for the second and third years.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Klix88)
    You'll probably find that it isn't financially possible.

    You don't have enough Student Finance entitlement left, to start a third degree from scratch. Everyone gets a 'grace' year of funding in case they start out at the wrong uni or on the wrong course - you have already used yours.

    If you want to start another new degree from year one, you would have to pay for the first year yourself (including tuition fees). Your SF support would only kick in for the second and third years.
    But doesn't this depend if the degree is BSc or BA? If OP did a BA in Psychology then OP has 4 years worth and if it's BSc isn't it 5 years?

    I don't know if it applies from scratch every time you go back to 1st year, but just a thought?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    But doesn't this depend if the degree is BSc or BA? If OP did a BA in Psychology then OP has 4 years worth and if it's BSc isn't it 5 years?

    I don't know if it applies from scratch every time you go back to 1st year, but just a thought?
    Sadly that makes no difference at all. The calculation is:

    Length of new course (minus) Previous years of uni-level study (plus) One year = Remaining years of entitlement.

    If the OP starts a new 4 year course that gives 4-2+1=3 years of funding. If they start a new 3 year course, 3-2+1=2, a new five year course gives 5-2+1=4. Any way it's worked, the OP has one year less than they'll need to start again from scratch. The length or subject of previous courses, isn't part of the calculation.

    If the new degree is NHS-sponsored that would be an exception to the above.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Honestly I was in the same boat in my 2/3rd year studying BSc Psychology. Are you in your first year at the new uni now then? You will need to weigh up the financial implications along with career choices before making a decision. If you stick it out with psychology then you will likely be able to choose modules that focus more on physiology in your second and third year. You will also need to consider what career path you would like to go down after your degree. Going the masters route after is popular and a lot of my peers are doing so in clinical psychology. It isn't a bad degree to have by itself and can gain entry to a lot of jobs that seek anyone with a bachelors.

    You're in a difficult position I'm afraid, but I hope you can make a decision. When I started having doubts I decided that I would stick it out to the end when I would apply for the GDL (law conversion) which I will hopefully be doing later this year. If you are reliant on student finance the posters above make a good point and that is something you will need to consider too. In the end it will really be up to you, but I would really recommend speaking to your tutor or other staff at your uni before making any decision. I wish you the best of luck!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Klix88)
    You'll probably find that it isn't financially possible.

    You don't have enough Student Finance entitlement left, to start a third degree from scratch. Everyone gets a 'grace' year of funding in case they start out at the wrong uni or on the wrong course - you have already used yours.

    If you want to start another new degree from year one, you would have to pay for the first year yourself (including tuition fees). Your SF support would only kick in for the second and third years.
    I'm pretty sure 5 years is paid for? I've only spent 2, so that leaves me 3 years left of SF?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    But doesn't this depend if the degree is BSc or BA? If OP did a BA in Psychology then OP has 4 years worth and if it's BSc isn't it 5 years?

    I don't know if it applies from scratch every time you go back to 1st year, but just a thought?
    It's BSc for both psychology and pharmacy or biomed, so doesn't that leave me 3 years left which fits since they're three year long courses
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Neptuner)
    Honestly I was in the same boat in my 2/3rd year studying BSc Psychology. Are you in your first year at the new uni now then? You will need to weigh up the financial implications along with career choices before making a decision. If you stick it out with psychology then you will likely be able to choose modules that focus more on physiology in your second and third year. You will also need to consider what career path you would like to go down after your degree. Going the masters route after is popular and a lot of my peers are doing so in clinical psychology. It isn't a bad degree to have by itself and can gain entry to a lot of jobs that seek anyone with a bachelors.

    You're in a difficult position I'm afraid, but I hope you can make a decision. When I started having doubts I decided that I would stick it out to the end when I would apply for the GDL (law conversion) which I will hopefully be doing later this year. If you are reliant on student finance the posters above make a good point and that is something you will need to consider too. In the end it will really be up to you, but I would really recommend speaking to your tutor or other staff at your uni before making any decision. I wish you the best of luck!
    Ugh yeah I am in my first year at the new university, I thought because 5 years is paid for right so now I am left with 3? So I haven't worried about that but another user is telling me otherwise

    I mean I feel I would become too depressed doing clinical psychology, I really want to do forensic psychology but now IDK I think it'll be way too hard and competition is insane and I don't even know now what else I can do with my degree...

    I always wanted to do medicine but was never smart enough for it so I went with something else that I enjoyed but I didn't really think of bio med or pharmacology etc
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Klix88)
    Sadly that makes no difference at all. The calculation is:

    Length of new course (minus) Previous years of uni-level study (plus) One year = Remaining years of entitlement.

    If the OP starts a new 4 year course that gives 4-2+1=3 years of funding. If they start a new 3 year course, 3-2+1=2, a new five year course gives 5-2+1=4. Any way it's worked, the OP has one year less than they'll need to start again from scratch. The length or subject of previous courses, isn't part of the calculation.

    If the new degree is NHS-sponsored that would be an exception to the above.
    I am confused, I've so far done 2 years of uni and if I were to change courses to biomed or pharmacy I'd be adding 3 more years, which makes 5? So wouldn't I be fine?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PsychPrincess)
    Ugh yeah I am in my first year at the new university, I thought because 5 years is paid for right so now I am left with 3? So I haven't worried about that but another user is telling me otherwise

    I mean I feel I would become too depressed doing clinical psychology, I really want to do forensic psychology but now IDK I think it'll be way too hard and competition is insane and I don't even know now what else I can do with my degree...

    I always wanted to do medicine but was never smart enough for it so I went with something else that I enjoyed but I didn't really think of bio med or pharmacology etc
    While a lot of the Psych masters are competitive, if you put in the effort it's not too bad. I know someone from my course who went immediately into a MA Forensic Psychology program with a 2:1 (mid-high I believe). He did a work placement in his final year I think with the probations office at the local prison which I would guess helped his application stand out. If you are considering this then maybe you could ask your tutor what related modules are offered for your 2nd/3rd year. At my uni I did a forensic module for my final year, and there was at least one professor who specialised in criminal psychology who offered topics on such for students taking his final year project/dissertation. Combining these, if you plan in advance you can really put yourself in a good position for a masters in forensic either immediately or a year after you've completed your bachelors.

    I'm afraid I'm not too sure about what would happen with your student finance if you were to change courses. It may be best to give them a call and see what they think.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Student finance will fund you for the length of the course, plus one year, minus any years previously spent in higher education. So for you to start another 3 year course, that's 3+1-2=2 years of funding remaining.

    You would only be entitled to 5 years of funding if you were starting a 5 year course, and even then you have still already had 2 years of funding, so no matter what length of course you choose to do now you will be 1 year short of funding. I would give them a call if you're in any doubt
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by PsychPrincess)
    I am confused, I've so far done 2 years of uni and if I were to change courses to biomed or pharmacy I'd be adding 3 more years, which makes 5? So wouldn't I be fine?
    No, you don't get an automatic 5 year entitlement. Your entitlement is linked to how long your new course is and how many years at uni you've already done.

    As per the formula in my post above, however long your previous or new courses are, you will always now be one year short of enough SF funding to start a new degree from scratch.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KyleH123)
    Cleanse your mind from envy of others being 2 years ahead of you as that is irrelevant and only your journey matters.
    Important.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jenigma)
    Important.
    u get me?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KyleH123)
    u get me?
    Ja
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.