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    I'm planning to study a psychology degree at uni next year, but I was wondering what careers I could go into and how I would get into them.
    I originally planned to be a clinical psychologist but then researched and found out that I would need to do several more years of education after uni and I'm not ready for that, so I was thinking maybe social work or something similar.
    Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
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    in the same boat
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    (Original post by jonnn69)
    I'm planning to study a psychology degree at uni next year, but I was wondering what careers I could go into and how I would get into them.
    I originally planned to be a clinical psychologist but then researched and found out that I would need to do several more years of education after uni and I'm not ready for that, so I was thinking maybe social work or something similar.
    Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
    I feel the same, I really wanted to work with mental health patients.😕
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    (Original post by jonnn69)
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    (Original post by scrawlx101)
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    (Original post by hollieperry)
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    Hiya,
    There's loads of information here about potential career pathways here:
    https://www.prospects.ac.uk/careers-...ree/psychology

    'Prospects' is a website that you'll probably be directed to at some point at university anyway.

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    I just completed my BSc Psychology and thought I'd offer some insight. Unfortunately a lot of work within the field will require graduate level study such as clinical psychology. Don't take my word but I believe if you don't take social work at undergraduate level, you may need to take a (shorter) graduate entry course in order to practice but double check that one. There are a lot of jobs out there which favour candidates with unspecified degrees so if you don't decide to go into further study you can still make use of your degree. From the people in my year (graduated 2015) a portion went right into graduate level study, some working a year before further study, some are doing work in care homes, some marketing, some retail. Personally I am looking to do the GDL (law conversion) which requires an undergraduate degree (usually 2:1 and above). My honest opinion, which I wish I was told before I started, would be to consider all your options if you do not plan to take it to graduate level. I'm happy to answer any questions you may have about the course!
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    (Original post by Neptuner)
    I just completed my BSc Psychology and thought I'd offer some insight. Unfortunately a lot of work within the field will require graduate level study such as clinical psychology. Don't take my word but I believe if you don't take social work at undergraduate level, you may need to take a (shorter) graduate entry course in order to practice but double check that one. There are a lot of jobs out there which favour candidates with unspecified degrees so if you don't decide to go into further study you can still make use of your degree. From the people in my year (graduated 2015) a portion went right into graduate level study, some working a year before further study, some are doing work in care homes, some marketing, some retail. Personally I am looking to do the GDL (law conversion) which requires an undergraduate degree (usually 2:1 and above). My honest opinion, which I wish I was told before I started, would be to consider all your options if you do not plan to take it to graduate level. I'm happy to answer any questions you may have about the course!
    Hi, thanks for helping!
    I do have some questions. Firstly, where did you choose to study? And is it similar to what you earned at A level and did you enjoy it?
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    (Original post by jonnn69)
    Hi, thanks for helping!
    I do have some questions. Firstly, where did you choose to study? And is it similar to what you earned at A level and did you enjoy it?
    No problem

    I studied at Nottingham which was my insurance. They have a great psych department so if you aiming for AAB then it's a solid choice.

    It's very different than A-Level I found. At A-Level my syllabus mostly involved comparing 'schools' of psychology (biological/behavioural/cognitive/etc.) or was evaluation of x disorder/theory under x school. University level I found had a less of a distinction and more of an agreement on a lot of theories, and I never really found solid theories that completely discount ones biology or cognition and such. At university level you're expected to thoroughly read journal articles that are important to whatever theory you are studying. At university level it was pretty scientific and you were always reminded when taught content was new or not yet entirely established. Whereas at A-Level it felt more like being spoon fed theories and not critically analysing such, more of a memory game there.

    Although it may sound so, university Psych didn't feel like too much of a jump. If you're good at critical analysis at A-Level, then this easily transfers when you start your degree.
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    (Original post by Neptuner)
    No problem

    I studied at Nottingham which was my insurance. They have a great psych department so if you aiming for AAB then it's a solid choice.

    It's very different than A-Level I found. At A-Level my syllabus mostly involved comparing 'schools' of psychology (biological/behavioural/cognitive/etc.) or was evaluation of x disorder/theory under x school. University level I found had a less of a distinction and more of an agreement on a lot of theories, and I never really found solid theories that completely discount ones biology or cognition and such. At university level you're expected to thoroughly read journal articles that are important to whatever theory you are studying. At university level it was pretty scientific and you were always reminded when taught content was new or not yet entirely established. Whereas at A-Level it felt more like being spoon fed theories and not critically analysing such, more of a memory game there.

    Although it may sound so, university Psych didn't feel like too much of a jump. If you're good at critical analysis at A-Level, then this easily transfers when you start your degree.
    What do you mean by critical analysis? What are the essays like? How many lab reportsdid you do?
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    (Original post by scrawlx101)
    What do you mean by critical analysis? What are the essays like? How many lab reportsdid you do?
    Mostly comes in the form of seeking out literature and compiling a well-rounded argument in your essays. Generally speaking in uni it seems favourable to come to come down on one side of the fence, especially in topics with contradicting literature. I found that at A-Level I was taught to favour the fence then come down slightly on one side. I was told by several lecturers at university they don't like that. At university you're expected to study a theory in full, know it's supporting data and data against, throw in some systematic reviews or cochrane report, then conclude your findings (never opinion.. or at least don't make it sound that way haha).

    I found that I was expected to provide reasoning behind any study I included or statements I made. A-Level does give a taste of this, but especially in your dissertation/lab reports you're given a chance to really show off your extra reading. I found at A-Level I was just tacking on studies in my citations with a vague idea of what they mean.

    Lab reports... I'm trying to remember now. I think we did 3 or 4 in both years 1 and 2 and then just the 1 in final year because that was our final year project.
 
 
 
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