Dropping Out Watch

LivvyCait
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Okay, so I'm in my final year of sixth form with CEE (retaking to make it CCD should be). I have severe depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorder.
I wanted to be a teacher. I wanted to go to university. But I feel like I can't take any more of school, I just want to get better.
Any advice?
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Jenx301
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(Original post by LivvyCait)
Okay, so I'm in my final year of sixth form with CEE (retaking to make it CCD should be). I have severe depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorder.
I wanted to be a teacher. I wanted to go to university. But I feel like I can't take any more of school, I just want to get better.
Any advice?
Have you been diagnosed by a professional?
Are you recieving treatment?
What have you tried so far?
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DiddyDec
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I would say drop out and get yourself sorted before returning to education. No point struggling on through if it is damaging your health.
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MissSaigon
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(Original post by LivvyCait)
Okay, so I'm in my final year of sixth form with CEE (retaking to make it CCD should be). I have severe depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorder.
I wanted to be a teacher. I wanted to go to university. But I feel like I can't take any more of school, I just want to get better.
Any advice?
I'm doing my A2's this year too and got CDEU last year (how fab) so I can understand how stressed you must be feeling (I'm hoping to pull my grades up to atleast BCC by retaking and atm its looking very unlikely).
I think its important to strengthen your mental health first as there's no point studying a degree which you may not enjoy if you're feeling so horrible :/
then again, you can try your hardest and see what happens? Perhaps if you get the help you need now, you can retake your exams by next summer? I'm not sure but that could be a possibility?
ultimately its upto you- its your decision and remember, you can always go to college in the future and do your A levels again or do a foundation course at uni? There are so many pathways into teaching, but for now, I'd suggest talking to a counsellor or someone who can get you the help you need ♥
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emilyjc17
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I think you'll only get worse if you give everything up to stay at home and 'get better'. I think routine and purpose is important and you may well have none of that if you give up your education.
This is coming from a 22 year old who spent Year 11 at home with severe anxiety, JUST made it back in time for GCSE's and got her act together in time for college and is currently at Uni doing well.

Life's bloody hard, it is for everybody. It's especially hard for those with mental health issues. I get that. But the worst thing you can do is give up and have nothing to fall back on. Make something of yourself instead. Don't give in, don't give up. Channel your strength - we've all got it. PLUS, A Levels are a really good qualification to have, they're your ticket to uni even if you don't go yet and they make you more employable.

Also, teaching is an incredibly stressful career. Loads of mental breakdowns etc in that profession. It's just my opinion, but if I were you, I'd focus your energies into something a bit less mentally burdening. Have a think about things you like, things you enjoy and things you're good at and do your research and come up with your best way forward.

When I was younger I used to aim really high and towards things that other people suggested but weren't actually for me. Now I aim for the things that suit me, are realistic and make me happy. F the rest

Get some counselling. See your doctor, he can refer you. No big deal but you need someone impartial to talk to.

+ Get a hobby.Or volunteer. Volunteering at an animal shelter, helping out at a nursery, helping serve food to the homeless, all fulfilling things to do. You're probably missing some fulfillment in your life, honestly.

3 good things.
You're probably pretty young - bags of life and time left to figure things out
You can read, write, think independently and are probably pretty smart
You can do whatever the hell you want with your life - just make sure it makes you happy. That's all that matters in the end, not money, not expectations. Just plain old contentment.
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LivvyCait
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(Original post by Jenx301)
Have you been diagnosed by a professional?
Are you recieving treatment?
What have you tried so far?
Yes
I'm on medication
Therapy, counselling, medication...
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MissSaigon
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(Original post by emilyjc17)
I think you'll only get worse if you give everything up to stay at home and 'get better'. I think routine and purpose is important and you may well have none of that if you give up your education.
This is coming from a 22 year old who spent Year 11 at home with severe anxiety, JUST made it back in time for GCSE's and got her act together in time for college and is currently at Uni doing well.

Life's bloody hard, it is for everybody. It's especially hard for those with mental health issues. I get that. But the worst thing you can do is give up and have nothing to fall back on. Make something of yourself instead. Don't give in, don't give up. Channel your strength - we've all got it. PLUS, A Levels are a really good qualification to have, they're your ticket to uni even if you don't go yet and they make you more employable.

Also, teaching is an incredibly stressful career. Loads of mental breakdowns etc in that profession. It's just my opinion, but if I were you, I'd focus your energies into something a bit less mentally burdening. Have a think about things you like, things you enjoy and things you're good at and do your research and come up with your best way forward.

When I was younger I used to aim really high and towards things that other people suggested but weren't actually for me. Now I aim for the things that suit me, are realistic and make me happy. F the rest

Get some counselling. See your doctor, he can refer you. No big deal but you need someone impartial to talk to.

+ Get a hobby.Or volunteer. Volunteering at an animal shelter, helping out at a nursery, helping serve food to the homeless, all fulfilling things to do. You're probably missing some fulfillment in your life, honestly.

3 good things.
You're probably pretty young - bags of life and time left to figure things out
You can read, write, think independently and are probably pretty smart
You can do whatever the hell you want with your life - just make sure it makes you happy. That's all that matters in the end, not money, not expectations. Just plain old contentment.
Love reading things like this! Glad you got through it and are happier now
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