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    Hi!

    I graduated from university in 2014 with a strong 2:1 in English Literature. I completed the GDL in 2015 and am now volunteering as an Adviser at my local CAB.

    I have work experience and completed a mini pupillage in Birmingham. I applied for 15 VAC schemes this year and got through to 3 ACs. I was then rejected by all of them. However, the experience has made me somewhat disillusioned with commercial law and I'm no longer sure if I want to go into that practice area anymore.

    I've always been interested in the GLS and considered it in the back of my mind. I think this might be a better fit for my personality. I really enjoy my work at CAB and thought that the GLS would be similar in the type of work it does in comparison to working with businesses and corporations. I'm also drawn to the fact that it can sometimes been a combination between law and politics.

    I just wanted advice as to how to approach my application? I know most people on these forums apply for commercial law firms, but has anyone ever applied to the GLS? I know what the application process is like, read through the website and True Chambers article. But I just wanted further insight into the training contract. If people have secured a TC with the GLS, what made you apply to them in the first place and how are you finding the work?

    Thanks for reading!
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    Would love to help but unfortunately I have no experience whatsoever of the GLS.

    Good luck though.
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    (Original post by Jasy)
    Would love to help but unfortunately I have no experience whatsoever of the GLS.

    Good luck though.
    Thanks anyway!
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    I applied to GLS, their app process is merit-based, at least in the initial stages. Go government! Putting The Equality Act where their mouth is

    Less onerous app form. Some situational judgment and I think verbal reasoning tests to go through first.

    Then an assessment centre. Prob an iv I don't know. They do look at your app, obvs, but as I understand, not until after the initial tests. Why don't all law firms do this?

    You don't have to have AAB at A level! Possibly even possibly not a 2.1. But maybe you do. It's all quite radical

    They quite often attend law fairs, talk to the trainees. They will tell you about drafting legislation and being on the inside of news stories

    Good for flexible working and families

    Don't forget you can also train in Local Govt and the CPS run training contracts from time to time


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    (Original post by happyinthehaze)
    I applied to GLS, their app process is merit-based, at least in the initial stages. Go government! Putting The Equality Act where their mouth is

    Less onerous app form. Some situational judgment and I think verbal reasoning tests to go through first.

    Then an assessment centre. Prob an iv I don't know. They do look at your app, obvs, but as I understand, not until after the initial tests. Why don't all law firms do this?

    You don't have to have AAB at A level! Possibly even possibly not a 2.1. But maybe you do. It's all quite radical

    They quite often attend law fairs, talk to the trainees. They will tell you about drafting legislation and being on the inside of news stories

    Good for flexible working and families

    Don't forget you can also train in Local Govt and the CPS run training contracts from time to time


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    Hey! Thanks for your post! I really appreciate your insight.

    When you said that they had a less onerous application form, do you mean that theu just ask generic questions like 'Why are you interested in public service? '. I've heard that some people struggle with the form because it's so different from commercial apps.

    Also, I heard you also have to ace the tests? Sorry for asking so many questions! I'm not currently at uni atm and can't attend law fairs etc. I wanted to attend an Open Day with them, but I couldn't find anything on their website.

    Thanks again for the reply!
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    [QUOTE=Law_hopeful2016;63492405]Hey! Thanks for your post! I really appreciate your insight.

    I honestly can't remember what they asked but the form seemed to be a lot different from the usual TC app. I think you had to select which the most relevant bits of work ex were to put down, which is quite a challenge if you remotely have any passed work life.

    I was impressed because I really like the way that they made everyone jump through the testing process first before they looked at anyone's app. This means that people aren't selected to go through to the next stage on the strength of their academics/what school or uni they want to.

    Just their ability. Radical eh?

    Presumably after that, they DO look at the app!

    Is it different than the usual - yes it was. I expect the TC is extremely different to anything in commercial law as well.

    Are the tests hard? I think there was a relatively straight forward one and then they got harder. The situational judgment one is quite tricky; impossible to know what the right answer is; who knows?

    Are they harder than this type of test are usually? I don't suppose so.

    I really do recommend trying to get along to a law fair where they pop up and talking to the trainees.

    Just apply if you think you might be interested in it
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    Sorry I see you aren't at uni - I don't know that they have open days but why not stalk some of their trainees on Linked In? Or try and get in contact by email to ask if there is any way you can access an open day - they might be slightly more open as they are a public service essentially - Totally Different than the commercial world
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    (Original post by happyinthehaze)
    Sorry I see you aren't at uni - I don't know that they have open days but why not stalk some of their trainees on Linked In? Or try and get in contact by email to ask if there is any way you can access an open day - they might be slightly more open as they are a public service essentially - Totally Different than the commercial world
    Thanks a lot! I think I'm just going to go for it and see how it goes. I can always practice tests to get better. If I don't get in this year, I'll apply else where or just apply again next year! But thanks a lot for the reply and the insight!
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    (Original post by Law_hopeful2016)
    Hi!

    I graduated from university in 2014 with a strong 2:1 in English Literature. I completed the GDL in 2015 and am now volunteering as an Adviser at my local CAB.

    I have work experience and completed a mini pupillage in Birmingham. I applied for 15 VAC schemes this year and got through to 3 ACs. I was then rejected by all of them. However, the experience has made me somewhat disillusioned with commercial law and I'm no longer sure if I want to go into that practice area anymore.

    I've always been interested in the GLS and considered it in the back of my mind. I think this might be a better fit for my personality. I really enjoy my work at CAB and thought that the GLS would be similar in the type of work it does in comparison to working with businesses and corporations. I'm also drawn to the fact that it can sometimes been a combination between law and politics.

    I just wanted advice as to how to approach my application? I know most people on these forums apply for commercial law firms, but has anyone ever applied to the GLS? I know what the application process is like, read through the website and True Chambers article. But I just wanted further insight into the training contract. If people have secured a TC with the GLS, what made you apply to them in the first place and how are you finding the work?

    Thanks for reading!

    Hey there, I was offered a Sept 2017 TC at the GLS but chose another TC that I was offered from a law firm. I also volunteered at the CAB for up to 2 years which drew me to the GLS as well! Thought I would just let you know further details of the application process if you'd like.

    From what I recall, there are 4 stages to the application process:

    1 - Application: Long form to fill in but nothing detailed required other than your work experience. This also includes a situational judgement test that is fairly easy due to the common sense nature of the test, e.g. multiple choice of what actions to do if you have a conflict with a colleague.

    2 - Verbal Reasoning: Those who are successful by passing the situational judgement test are then given a verbal reasoning test to do. Standard type (forgot which company, could be made by the UK Gov specifically), and requires a pass.

    3 - Critical Reasoning/Watson Glazer: This is a toughie, being a standard Watson Glazer BUT you have to be within the top X% of people who pass this test. I believe it was about 100-150 who get to the final stage from 3000+ applicants.

    4 - Assessment Centre: This is split into two halves -
    First half (1 hour) is the written assessment which is answering a number of questions based on a short fact file given to you that requires no prior legal knowledge, e.g. what are the pros and cons of doing X based on the current law (extracts given to you) and the documents provided.
    Second half is the interview (1 hour) which I felt was split into 3 segments: First 15 minutes was to answer questions from the panel on your written assessment, including correcting any mistakes, adding anything on, etc. Afterwards, the questions are competency-focused and an assessment grid is strictly adhered to (this is available to you on their website). I felt that this was very much of a grilling on competency-based stuff, and was absolutely gruelling. Finally, there are a few personal questions on motivations and wider knowledge, e.g. why GLS, tell us some law issues you have been interested in, public law interests, etc. Then a chance to ask your own questions.

    Following this, you will (hopefully) get 2 responses - firstly whether you have PASSED the assessment centre, but this does not guarantee that you get the TC, and secondly whether you scored high enough in those that have passed to achieve the TC. I got the email as to whether I passed the day after (I was in the last AC slot) and received a phone call for the TC offer a couple days afterwards. I believe it is 35 trainees taken on in total. You also receive a full report of your AC on your strengths and weaknesses and your marks for each section, which was extremely helpful for reflection although I did get mine a good 2 or so months after the AC.

    One key thing to note is that you will have the choice of 3 departments - GLD, BIS and NCA. There are limited vacancies specifically for BIS and NCA, but your choices are important as it will be those who are in charge of the relevant departments that will be choosing who to offer TCs to.

    Hope that's been helpful, and if you have any questions on the application process let me know!
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    What an excellent insightful post! All this and drafting the actual law too


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    (Original post by thetfordkid0)
    Hey there, I was offered a Sept 2017 TC at the GLS but chose another TC that I was offered from a law firm. I also volunteered at the CAB for up to 2 years which drew me to the GLS as well! Thought I would just let you know further details of the application process if you'd like.

    From what I recall, there are 4 stages to the application process:

    1 - Application: Long form to fill in but nothing detailed required other than your work experience. This also includes a situational judgement test that is fairly easy due to the common sense nature of the test, e.g. multiple choice of what actions to do if you have a conflict with a colleague.

    2 - Verbal Reasoning: Those who are successful by passing the situational judgement test are then given a verbal reasoning test to do. Standard type (forgot which company, could be made by the UK Gov specifically), and requires a pass.

    3 - Critical Reasoning/Watson Glazer: This is a toughie, being a standard Watson Glazer BUT you have to be within the top X% of people who pass this test. I believe it was about 100-150 who get to the final stage from 3000+ applicants.

    4 - Assessment Centre: This is split into two halves -
    First half (1 hour) is the written assessment which is answering a number of questions based on a short fact file given to you that requires no prior legal knowledge, e.g. what are the pros and cons of doing X based on the current law (extracts given to you) and the documents provided.
    Second half is the interview (1 hour) which I felt was split into 3 segments: First 15 minutes was to answer questions from the panel on your written assessment, including correcting any mistakes, adding anything on, etc. Afterwards, the questions are competency-focused and an assessment grid is strictly adhered to (this is available to you on their website). I felt that this was very much of a grilling on competency-based stuff, and was absolutely gruelling. Finally, there are a few personal questions on motivations and wider knowledge, e.g. why GLS, tell us some law issues you have been interested in, public law interests, etc. Then a chance to ask your own questions.

    Following this, you will (hopefully) get 2 responses - firstly whether you have PASSED the assessment centre, but this does not guarantee that you get the TC, and secondly whether you scored high enough in those that have passed to achieve the TC. I got the email as to whether I passed the day after (I was in the last AC slot) and received a phone call for the TC offer a couple days afterwards. I believe it is 35 trainees taken on in total. You also receive a full report of your AC on your strengths and weaknesses and your marks for each section, which was extremely helpful for reflection although I did get mine a good 2 or so months after the AC.

    One key thing to note is that you will have the choice of 3 departments - GLD, BIS and NCA. There are limited vacancies specifically for BIS and NCA, but your choices are important as it will be those who are in charge of the relevant departments that will be choosing who to offer TCs to.

    Hope that's been helpful, and if you have any questions on the application process let me know!
    Thank you so much for your reply! It really helped. I was wondering, though, did you prepare for the WG test beforehand? I prefer VR tests and I'm weak when it comes to the WG...

    But again, thank you again for your insightful post!
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    (Original post by Law_hopeful2016)
    Thank you so much for your reply! It really helped. I was wondering, though, did you prepare for the WG test beforehand? I prefer VR tests and I'm weak when it comes to the WG...

    But again, thank you again for your insightful post!
    It was actually my first proper WG I had to do so I was surprised that I managed to get within that top percentile, let alone pass!

    Because of my lack of experience with WG tests, I did lots of practice for them beforehand literally by just searching for as many practice tests as possible online. I know a few of the big firms have WG practice tests (Links, CC, Herbert Smith I believe) and there are scattered tests here and there for free or to pay for elsewhere.

    Good luck when you apply!
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    Hello, I am also interested in a training contract with the GLS. I applied last year and did not get past the situational judgement test. I was absolutely gutted as I have practiced the Verbal Reasoning Tests and always achieve 80%+. I have also completed a mock Watson Glazer Critical Thinking Test with my Uni Careers Service, and the feedback that I was given was that I scored in the top 7% of law graduates, so I was well prepared for the later tests.

    I am applying again this year and really want the opportunity to complete the VRT and CRT, and hopefully reach the assessment centre stage, but I found the situational judgement test incredibly tricky last year, even though I spent months researching the GLS and their criteria prior to applying.

    You mentioned that you found the situational judgement test easy. Can you offer any advice on it? What kind of answers did you go for? Answers which showed that you liked to solve problems by yourself or answers which showed that you weren't afraid to ask for help?

    I'd really appreciate any advice you can give. Thanks in advance.
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    (Original post by Galf)
    Hello, I am also interested in a training contract with the GLS. I applied last year and did not get past the situational judgement test. I was absolutely gutted as I have practiced the Verbal Reasoning Tests and always achieve 80%+. I have also completed a mock Watson Glazer Critical Thinking Test with my Uni Careers Service, and the feedback that I was given was that I scored in the top 7% of law graduates, so I was well prepared for the later tests.

    I am applying again this year and really want the opportunity to complete the VRT and CRT, and hopefully reach the assessment centre stage, but I found the situational judgement test incredibly tricky last year, even though I spent months researching the GLS and their criteria prior to applying.

    You mentioned that you found the situational judgement test easy. Can you offer any advice on it? What kind of answers did you go for? Answers which showed that you liked to solve problems by yourself or answers which showed that you weren't afraid to ask for help?

    I'd really appreciate any advice you can give. Thanks in advance.
    SJTs are usually designed so that each answer has a negative, neutral and positive score. If there are four potential answers then there could be 2 neutral or 2 negative answers.

    The best way to approach it is to eliminate the worst response as that will have the negative score. Neutral responses are not so bad if you choose them, but the negative scores will negate any positive scoring answers you do get right.

    Having designed SJTs it isn't as simple as always going for the answer that either suggests you ask for help or that you do things by yourself. Each test could easily have both those answers in different questions.

    Look carefully at the language used in the example and think what would be the most realistic response, not the "best" if that makes sense.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    SJTs are usually designed so that each answer has a negative, neutral and positive score. If there are four potential answers then there could be 2 neutral or 2 negative answers.

    The best way to approach it is to eliminate the worst response as that will have the negative score. Neutral responses are not so bad if you choose them, but the negative scores will negate any positive scoring answers you do get right.

    Having designed SJTs it isn't as simple as always going for the answer that either suggests you ask for help or that you do things by yourself. Each test could easily have both those answers in different questions.

    Look carefully at the language used in the example and think what would be the most realistic response, not the "best" if that makes sense.


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    Thank you for your reply. It's really useful to know how the SJT is marked as well. Thank you for the tips!
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    (Original post by happyinthehaze)
    What an excellent insightful post! All this and drafting the actual law too


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    Don't get too hung up on this - many government lawyers do not do legislative drafting.
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    [QUOTE=Law_hopeful2016;63424401]Hi!

    I graduated from university in 2015 with a strong 2:1 in Law. I have also been volunteering as an adviser at my local CAB and am now a certified adviser. Additional to this, i have complete a mini pupilage.

    I am also interested in applying for the GLS, however, after reading some of the messages on this forum it has made me somewhat sceptical as i feel i am not prepared for the situation judgment test as of yet. I am not willing to take my chances with the application unprepared.

    Have you prepared at all for the upcoming tests? If so, which website or resource do you use?

    Moreover, what motivated you to apply for the GLS?
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    (Original post by thetfordkid0)
    Hey there, I was offered a Sept 2017 TC at the GLS but chose another TC that I was offered from a law firm. I also volunteered at the CAB for up to 2 years which drew me to the GLS as well! Thought I would just let you know further details of the application process if you'd like.

    From what I recall, there are 4 stages to the application process:

    1 - Application: Long form to fill in but nothing detailed required other than your work experience. This also includes a situational judgement test that is fairly easy due to the common sense nature of the test, e.g. multiple choice of what actions to do if you have a conflict with a colleague.

    2 - Verbal Reasoning: Those who are successful by passing the situational judgement test are then given a verbal reasoning test to do. Standard type (forgot which company, could be made by the UK Gov specifically), and requires a pass.

    3 - Critical Reasoning/Watson Glazer: This is a toughie, being a standard Watson Glazer BUT you have to be within the top X% of people who pass this test. I believe it was about 100-150 who get to the final stage from 3000+ applicants.

    4 - Assessment Centre: This is split into two halves -
    First half (1 hour) is the written assessment which is answering a number of questions based on a short fact file given to you that requires no prior legal knowledge, e.g. what are the pros and cons of doing X based on the current law (extracts given to you) and the documents provided.
    Second half is the interview (1 hour) which I felt was split into 3 segments: First 15 minutes was to answer questions from the panel on your written assessment, including correcting any mistakes, adding anything on, etc. Afterwards, the questions are competency-focused and an assessment grid is strictly adhered to (this is available to you on their website). I felt that this was very much of a grilling on competency-based stuff, and was absolutely gruelling. Finally, there are a few personal questions on motivations and wider knowledge, e.g. why GLS, tell us some law issues you have been interested in, public law interests, etc. Then a chance to ask your own questions.

    Following this, you will (hopefully) get 2 responses - firstly whether you have PASSED the assessment centre, but this does not guarantee that you get the TC, and secondly whether you scored high enough in those that have passed to achieve the TC. I got the email as to whether I passed the day after (I was in the last AC slot) and received a phone call for the TC offer a couple days afterwards. I believe it is 35 trainees taken on in total. You also receive a full report of your AC on your strengths and weaknesses and your marks for each section, which was extremely helpful for reflection although I did get mine a good 2 or so months after the AC.

    One key thing to note is that you will have the choice of 3 departments - GLD, BIS and NCA. There are limited vacancies specifically for BIS and NCA, but your choices are important as it will be those who are in charge of the relevant departments that will be choosing who to offer TCs to.

    Hope that's been helpful, and if you have any questions on the application process let me know!
    Great post - thanks. So did you hear that you had a TC two days after the assessments finished - ie the day after they told you you'd passed?
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    (Original post by AustinTX)
    Great post - thanks. So did you hear that you had a TC two days after the assessments finished - ie the day after they told you you'd passed?
    Don't remember the exact dates, but it was definitely before September 1st - I'd say I got the phone call around 27th August and the official documents came through September onwards.
 
 
 
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