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LSE Islamic Society Holds Gender Segregated Dinner. Watch

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    (Original post by Legendary Quest)
    They knew from the very beginning that there would be gender segregation because it happens at most, if not, all major Islamic events. They knew that and decided to go anyway. They made that decision. If they didn't want that, then they shouldn't have gone.
    Islam is a lot of fun isn't it?
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    (Original post by JezWeCan!)
    Islam is a lot of fun isn't it?
    It sure is. Just look at what it causes on TSR.

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    (Original post by Achaea)
    If they were segregating people by race, would you see an issue, or also claim 'they can do what they want, it's a free country'? Or if you think it's wrong to segregate by race, why is not wrong to segregate by gender?
    but they feel comfortable with it though. there choice.
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    (Original post by noey123)
    but they feel comfortable with it though. there choice.
    You didn't answer my question. If people feel 'comfortable' with racial segregation, and it's their choice, would you accept it? Quite a lot of people were 'comfortable' with the status quo under apartheid in South Africa, and with segregation in the US a few decades ago. Does that mean these things are beyond criticism? Generally speaking, do you think that just because some people make a choice, no-one else is ever allowed to criticise that choice? I'm trying to see what you're getting at here.

    You say this sexually segregated dinner was the choice of the participants. OK. If some of them had wanted the choice to sit in a mixed area, would their choice have been accommodated?
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    (Original post by Achaea)
    You didn't answer my question. If people feel 'comfortable' with racial segregation, and it's their choice, would you accept it? Quite a lot of people were 'comfortable' with the status quo under apartheid in South Africa, and with segregation in the US a few decades ago. Does that mean these things are beyond criticism? Generally speaking, do you think that just because some people make a choice, no-one else is ever allowed to criticise that choice? I'm trying to see what you're getting at here.

    You say this sexually segregated dinner was the choice of the participants. OK. If some of them had wanted the choice to sit in a mixed area, would their choice have been accommodated?
    There's a reasonable question to ask about how much the participants feel pressured into it. I'd guess that in their ISOC there is probably a significant minority who are very strongly in favour of segregation, and their preference wins out against the larger number of people who feel less strongly about it.

    There are also probably Muslims in the ISOC who feel uncomfortable with it, but also fear they will be labelled as un-Islamic if they don't comply with it.
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    (Original post by Achaea)
    You didn't answer my question. If people feel 'comfortable' with racial segregation, and it's their choice, would you accept it? Quite a lot of people were 'comfortable' with the status quo under apartheid in South Africa, and with segregation in the US a few decades ago. Does that mean these things are beyond criticism? Generally speaking, do you think that just because some people make a choice, no-one else is ever allowed to criticise that choice? I'm trying to see what you're getting at here.

    You say this sexually segregated dinner was the choice of the participants. OK. If some of them had wanted the choice to sit in a mixed area, would their choice have been accommodated?
    i see where your coming from and personally i wouldn't be comfortable with racial segregation and i would definitely not accept it. however why would they attend a sexually segregated dinner if they were not comfortable with it in the first place. people are allowed to criticize there choice however it is still there choice. As long as it does not interfere with the law then i don't see why this would be a problem. if they don't like the idea of a sexually segregated dinner then don't attend. obviously i don't agree with this whole thing but they can do what they want. and whether there choice would be accommodate or not i don't know about that. i know it's sexist and it's wrong but this is how things are am afraid
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    (Original post by BeastOfSyracuse)
    There's a reasonable question to ask about how much the participants feel pressured into it. I'd guess that in their ISOC there is probably a significant minority who are very strongly in favour of segregation, and their preference wins out against the larger number of people who feel less strongly about it.

    There are also probably Muslims in the ISOC who feel uncomfortable with it, but also fear they will be labelled as un-Islamic if they don't comply with it.
    Well apparently some felt 'intimidated' by the segregation. But it does seem quite absurd that these western Muslims who can likely act maturely and cordially in the company of the opposite sex, in other settings like work, university, rallies etc, but then all of sudden it's as if some have lost all self control. As if they'll start behaving like certain Muslims (in Egypt, Iran, Saudi or the migrants in Europe) and start harassing the muslim women, when attending this event.

    Are they incapable of acting maturely in front of the opposite sex, thus the need for a barrier? Is it that their faith goes weak when witnessing and interacting with the opposite sex? Do they believe in discriminatory and misogynistic views i.e. women are inferior or 'fitna'?

    http://www.itv.com/news/london/2016-...t-annual-ball/
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    "Many of those attending the event said they felt intimidated by the segregation that took place and it should have respected the plethora of different views in Islamic faith. Many of those viewpoints agree that the Islamic faith has no contradiction with absolute women's equality."

    "It's absurd, because these men and women would be seeing each other coming in and out of the building, yet they're artificially segregated and the next day they're going to be interacting with each other during the day. It's just ridiculous."

    http://www.itv.com/news/london/2016-...t-annual-ball/
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    (Original post by Emperor Trajan)
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    Good comment. Note the almost Orwellian comment from the LGBT lady who attended;

    The women asked for it to be segregated so that they can feel comfortable, not all of them want to have their hair tied up and hidden - they don't want to be exposed to the men. That's a choice they have made.– PERDITA BLINKHORN, LGBT+ ALLIANCE AT LSE
    That's complete double-think; as if the only way they could have their hair down is if there is a kind of room-burqa rather than a personal burqa.

    There were also comments from the General Secretary of the LSESU who attended the event, she started whining on Twitter about how it was racist to criticise this arrangement and that she was actually advocating "de-colonised" feminism.

    Gawd these people are a bunch of tedious prats, their desperate need to be so unbearably, intersectionally politically correct requires the most ludicrous intellectual gymnastics to not only justify the unjustifiable, but to go on to claim that supporting unjustifiable misogyny is actually "true feminism"
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    (Original post by Emperor Trajan)
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    It's also interesting to note that really conservative interpretations of Islam is now accepted as mainstream Islam by Muslims themselves. I'd guess that you probably didn't have segregated dinners in the ISOC of maybe 20 years ago, the fanatical hyper-conservatism of many young Muslims seems to be a trend

    I believe that these young Muslims are often fed stories about how Islam is oppressed by the evil West, about how everything is a conspiracy and so on. And from that view, adopting Islamism and hyper-conservative interpretations makes them feel powerful, it makes them feel authentic. It's very sad given how many lives will be ruined by this (and it will be propagated to their children)
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    (Original post by BeastOfSyracuse)
    It's also interesting to note that really conservative interpretations of Islam is now accepted as mainstream Islam by Muslims themselves. I'd guess that you probably didn't have segregated dinners in the ISOC of maybe 20 years ago, the fanatical hyper-conservatism of many young Muslims seems to be a trend

    I believe that these young Muslims are often fed stories about how Islam is oppressed by the evil West, about how everything is a conspiracy and so on. And from that view, adopting Islamism and hyper-conservative interpretations makes them feel powerful, it makes them feel authentic. It's very sad given how many lives will be ruined by this (and it will be propagated to their children)
    I have friend who has attended LSE and has worked with the former admins of the ISOC and has attended their past two ISOC dinners. He apparently says these former events were not segregated and that this event is the result of the administration of new heads of the ISOC. Quite a change.
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    (Original post by Emperor Trajan)
    I have friend who has attended LSE and has worked with the former admins of the ISOC and has attended their past two ISOC dinners. He apparently says these former events were not segregated and that this event is the result of the administration of new heads of the ISOC. Quite a change.
    Very interesting. Many commentators have said this generation is more conservative than their parents

    It feels like the spirit of the age (at least within the Islamic community). It's a time of increasing conservatism of Muslims. They have a hyper-awareness of everything that happens in the world that has some relationship to Muslims (if a sunni Muslim somewhere in the world slips on a banana peel, they all go into hysterics,on Twitter and feel sorry for themselves and reinforce to each other how Islam is under attack and presumably how that proves the truth of Islam).

    To be honest I find it quite tedious and I find them pathetic, self-pitying, conspiracy-obsessed. It remains to be seen whether this infects an entire generation of Western Muslims, or it's just a passing phase for most
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    (Original post by BeastOfSyracuse)
    Very interesting. Many commentators have said this generation is more conservative than their parents

    It feels like the spirit of the age (at least within the Islamic community). It's a time of increasing conservatism of Muslims. They have a hyper-awareness of everything that happens in the world that has some relationship to Muslims (if a sunni Muslim somewhere in the world slips on a banana peel, they all go into hysterics,on Twitter and feel sorry for themselves and reinforce to each other how Islam is under attack and presumably how that proves the truth of Islam).

    To be honest I find it quite tedious and I find them pathetic, self-pitying, conspiracy-obsessed. It remains to be seen whether this infects an entire generation of Western Muslims, or it's just a passing phase for most
    Well it appears that there is a growing polarisation in the Muslim world and Muslim communities in Europe. Where at one end of the spectrum, there's a growing religiosity, conservatism and fundamentalism amongst some Muslims and on other the end, there is a also the growth of cultural Muslims, liberal Muslims and apostates. Both feed of each other, Both opposed to each other, with quite a number of the former seeking for the punishment of the latter, via fines, flogging, ostracization, imprisonment and/or death.

    (I've somewhat witness this trend in my own Muslim community)

    "...Sami Zubaida, a scholar at London’s Birkbeck College, speaks of increasing polarisation, with “growing religiosity at one end of the spectrum and growing atheism and secularism at the other...”

    http://www.economist.com/news/intern...are-no-god-not
 
 
 
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