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    Can anybody briefly descibe calculation of phase difference in a stationary wave (in two different waves which are superposed and are same frequency and amplitude)
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    Sorry you've not had any responses about this.

    Why not try posting in a specific subject forum- you might have more luck there.

    Here's a link to our subject forum which should help get you more responses.

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    phase difference is basically the difference in wavelength between two different waves. For example, the phase difference between sin(x) and cos(x) is 90 degrees or pi/4 radians. Two waves that are in phase share the same wavelength at the same time intervals e.g. sin(x) and 3sin(x)
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    when waves are in phase it means that they are travelling together with their peak and trough are in line (think of it as 2 dolphins swimming together)

    when waves are not in phase, one of the wave is half a wavelength behind or in front of the other wave and so there is a difference of 180 degrees between the two waves troughs and peak and so they cancel each other out - destructive waves

    if there is a difference of 1 whole wave (360 degrees) then that will be in phase as the peaks and troughs will be in line again - constructive waves so the amplitude of the 2 waves will add up and the new amplitude will be the sum of the amplitude of the 2 old waves

    i dont even know if this makes sense tbh lol
    look at diagrams in textbooks or on the internet it will be easier to understand with them
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    What the above have described is a correct and describes phase difference between two progressive waves - apart from MathsAstronomy12 who stated that a phase difference of 90 degrees is
    pi/4 radians, when in fact it is:
    \frac{\pi}{2}

    In terms of calculations, you can work out phase difference using the following:
    \frac{2\pi\ d}{\lambda}

    where d is the distance of the two points on one wave apart, and where the wavelength is lambda.
 
 
 
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