alevels2k17
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#1
1) why does graphite have a higher melting temp than that of buckminsterfullerene

2) does buckminsterfullerene conduct electricity or not.... my book says it doesnt but it has one delocalised electron so it doesnt really make sense:/
0
reply
thefatone
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 years ago
#2
(Original post by pondsteps)
1) why does graphite have a higher melting temp than that of buckminsterfullerene

2) does buckminsterfullerene conduct electricity or not.... my book says it doesnt but it has one delocalised electron so it doesnt really make sense:/
Buckminsterfullerine has a simple molecular structure so has weak covalent bonds between carbon atoms however graphite has a giant covalent structure and has 3 strong covalent bonds bonded to each carbon atom. Thus graphite has a higher melting temp than that of the buckminsterfullerene

Yes it does if something has a delocalised electrons then as far as i know it conducts electricity sounds like your book's wrong....
0
reply
alevels2k17
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#3
(Original post by thefatone)
Buckminsterfullerine has a simple molecular structure so has weak covalent bonds between carbon atoms however graphite has a giant covalent structure and has 3 strong covalent bonds bonded to each carbon atom. Thus graphite has a higher melting temp than that of the buckminsterfullerene

Yes it does if something has a delocalised electrons then as far as i know it conducts electricity sounds like your book's wrong....
wait how do covalent bonds break by melting arent only the intermolecular forces that are broken!!
0
reply
thefatone
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 years ago
#4
(Original post by pondsteps)
wait how do covalent bonds break by melting arent only the intermolecular forces that are broken!!
right that's right so many strong covalent bonds must be broken to melt graphite.<---- requires lots of energy

in the buckminsterfullerine to melt it you must LOOSEN the intermolecular forces.<----- requires not much energy
(break the forces(i.e. completely remove them means you boil the substance and it changes its state into a gas)
0
reply
alevels2k17
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#5
(Original post by thefatone)
right that's right so many strong covalent bonds must be broken to melt graphite.<---- requires lots of energy

in the buckminsterfullerine to melt it you must LOOSEN the intermolecular forces.<----- requires not much energy
(break the forces(i.e. completely remove them means you boil the substance and it changes its state into a gas)
thank u sooo much!!
so the covalent bonds are broken during melting only in macromolecular structures like diamond and graphite right? other than that its only the intermolecular forces affected !?
0
reply
thefatone
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by pondsteps)
thank u sooo much!!
so the covalent bonds are broken during melting only in macromolecular structures like diamond and graphite right? other than that its only the intermolecular forces affected !?
yea that's true but if you want to boil the macromolecular stuff like diamond( xD) then you'll have to break the bonds aswell.
yes the forces are LOOSENED as we put it if you say you want to melt a simple molecular substance. ^-^
1
reply
alevels2k17
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#7
(Original post by thefatone)
yea that's true but if you want to boil the macromolecular stuff like diamond( xD) then you'll have to break the bonds aswell.
yes the forces are LOOSENED as we put it if you say you want to melt a simple molecular substance. ^-^
thanks a lot for helping xxx
0
reply
Pigster
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 years ago
#8
The delocalised electron may be free to move around the molecule, but how could it jump from one molecule to the next? and hence how could electricity flow throughout the structure?
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of East Anglia
    PGCE Open day Postgraduate
    Tue, 3 Mar '20
  • University of Bradford
    Postgraduate Open day/Evening Postgraduate
    Tue, 3 Mar '20
  • Queen's University Belfast
    Postgraduate LIVE Masters & PhD Study Fair Postgraduate
    Wed, 4 Mar '20

Do you get study leave?

Yes- I like it (505)
59.62%
Yes- I don't like it (43)
5.08%
No- I want it (241)
28.45%
No- I don't want it (58)
6.85%

Watched Threads

View All