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    (Original post by Haamoo7)
    What about them?
    How do you if it is a reflection? and how do you know by how many degrees etc?
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    (Original post by Glavien)
    Hi, can someone link the January 2016 IAL paper please?
    It's in post 542 Jan 2016 paper

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    (Original post by maruchan)
    It's in post 542 Jan 2016 paper

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    Thanks!
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    (Original post by I-Hate-Edexcel)
    How do you if it is a reflection? and how do you know by how many degrees etc?
    There are 4 reflections you have to know: reflection in the line y=x, reflection in the line y=-x, reflection in the x axis and reflection in the y axis.
    This guy explains them really well:
    x axis
    http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r...eflectionx.php
    y axis
    http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r...eflectiony.php
    y=x
    http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r...ionyequalx.php
    y=-x
    http://www.examsolutions.net/maths-r...qualminusx.php

    As for how many degrees, I'm not sure what you mean, as when reflecting an object, there are no angles required. :confused:
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    F1 or FP1?

    What even is F1?
    Slightly different spec from FP1 I think.
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    Cheers Mate
    Sometimes you have to write 90 degress clockwise so i was thinking you had to do that here aswell
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    Do we need to remember any proofs off by heart (i.e. formula proofs etc, not referring to proof by induction) for FP1?
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    (Original post by physicalgraffiti)
    Do we need to remember any proofs off by heart (i.e. formula proofs etc, not referring to proof by induction) for FP1?
    You should be able to do the tangent & normal of rectangular hyperbola and parabola.

    Maybe also the proof that the distance from the focus is equal to the distance from the directrix.
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    For proof's by induction, when the question asks to prove that _____ is divisible by X, are we allowed to use the general rule that (M^n -1) is always divisible by (M-1)? I've done that in a couple of recent assessments and been marked correct but i thought I'd be better safe than sorry
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    Anyone come across some really hard questions to prep for tomorrow? Esp coordinate geometry. If anyone finds any evil questions. Appreciate, cheers

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    For linear interpolation questions, are we allowed to draw a straight line or do we have to make it a curve? Also, will it be considered wrong if we draw the positive value of f(x) below the axis or vice versa?

    Anyone?
    Zacken
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    Name:  image.png
Views: 94
Size:  141.2 KB

    Hey,

    With regards to part b of this question, are there any easier ways to solve it?

    I used the transformation given in a) to find out how many 225 degree rotations it would take to get back to the identity matrix (leading to 8 times, n=8)

    Any other ways of doing it?

    Cheers
    Jack
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    (Original post by oinkk)
    Name:  image.png
Views: 94
Size:  141.2 KB

    Hey,

    With regards to part b of this question, are there any easier ways to solve it?

    I used the transformation given in a) to find out how many 225 degree rotations it would take to get back to the identity matrix (leading to 8 times, n=8)

    Any other ways of doing it?

    Cheers
    Jack
    sorry but, which paper's that?
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    (Original post by Louisb19)
    You should be able to do the tangent & normal of rectangular hyperbola and parabola.

    Maybe also the proof that the distance from the focus is equal to the distance from the directrix.
    Please could you post a pic or link to the distance from the focus and directrix formula, not sure I've come across it, thanks
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    (Original post by oinkk)
    Name:  image.png
Views: 94
Size:  141.2 KB

    Hey,

    With regards to part b of this question, are there any easier ways to solve it?

    I used the transformation given in a) to find out how many 225 degree rotations it would take to get back to the identity matrix (leading to 8 times, n=8)

    Any other ways of doing it?

    Cheers
    Jack
    I think that's the simplest way of doing it, just 360 / (225-180)
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    Try this hard question and reply by sending the solution if you solve it. The hardest one you can get. I could not solve it
    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by samoo311)
    sorry but, which paper's that?
    Jan 16 international. Unsure of whether I'm allowed to link to it because it isn't publicly available. You can find it online.
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    (Original post by NotNotBatman)
    Attachment 534525

    For part (b)  C(-2a,\frac{-2ar}{q-a}), so why do you have to use \frac{2ar}{q-a} as the vertical distance of OCS? How would you know if \frac{-2ar}{q-a} is positive or negative?
    Question says q > a
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    (Original post by SLamb)
    I think that's the simplest way of doing it, just 360 / (225-180)
    Ah, that's quite handy. I'm guessing that would work for any angle of rotation.
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    Community Assistant
    (Original post by The_Big_E)
    Question says q > a
    What about r then?
 
 
 
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