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Edexcel A2 Chemistry Exams -6CH04 (14th June) and 6CH05 (22nd June) Discussion Thread watch

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    (Original post by C0balt)
    I didn't put equilibrium arrow for the sunglasses so fml lol. And that cisplatin bs, then why there's geometrical isomers. The very last cation and anion thing idk either. That's about it that I got wrong/not sure. Might have lost a few marks for writing question for not making the point they want me to make but oh well. Fingers crossed for 100% UMS but not sure tbh
    dont think you need to put the equilibrium arrow do you????
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    (Original post by razortoad)
    I meant for the PCl5 reaction, sorry xD
    Ohhh nah that's a by-product so we didn't even need to include it xD Btw u look familiar do I know u???
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    I have no idea then, I didn't do Jan 2016 paper. Was it the same molecule?
    Methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate molecules are held together by (strong) London/ dispersion forces IGNORE Dipole forces and hydrogen bonds (1)Less / limited hydrogen bond betweenwater and methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (so sparingly soluble) (1) The hydrogen bonding between water molecules is (very) strong (1)Insufficient energy released to break hydrogen bonds in water/ London forces in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (1) (Some of the) hydrogen bonds are internal in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (1) The oxygens in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate can form hydrogen bonds to the hydrogens of water molecules OR The hydrogen on the oxygen in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate can form hydrogen bonds to the oxygens of water molecules (1)

    That's the mark scheme.
    This question is about solubility though.
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    Anyone up for doing an unofficial mark scheme?

    Oh and what did people get for the vanadium question, pretty sure I ****ed that up
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    (Original post by lfcrules)
    dont think you need to put the equilibrium arrow do you????
    It is an equilibrium but they might allow it
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    For the 2-Nitrophenol and 4-Nitrophenol is it to do with the intermolecular hydrogen bonding and intramolecular hydrogen bonding? And also for the last questions do both cooh turn to coo- and both nh2 turn to nh3+
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    C0balt 'Twas just one reaction for the vanadium iodide ion thing right?
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    Haha yeah me too in the same areas (except the equilibrium thing). I think I got the one about a reason for why 3 steps is better wrong (I said uses less environmentally harmful chemicals) and the one about the problem of one isomer of the drug or whatever wrong :// I know for sure that I got the MCQ about the molecular formula wrong also. But on the whole, not too bad ?!
    I said that there's less waste because that's what the passage said lol
    (Original post by jwanjwan)
    I thought it was because of steric hindrance due to the lone pairs on the delta negative oxygen and nitrogen being so close together so two hydrogen bonds couldnt form per molecule
    Well then I have no idea lol
    (Original post by GrandMasti)
    Can you remember the main Q in section B? how many were there (like big questions, not parts lol). Like the first one was about E cell and vanadium, etc.?
    Uh no I can't remember, I just remember seeing loads of TM and benzene rings lmao
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    (Original post by Hamzy45)
    For the 2-Nitrophenol and 4-Nitrophenol is it to do with the intermolecular hydrogen bonding and intramolecular hydrogen bonding? And also for the last questions do both cooh turn to coo- and both nh2 turn to nh3+
    I talked about in 2-nitrophenol the NO2 and OH are closer together so weaker H bonds and then for 4-nitrophenol I basically said the opposite lel.

    For the cation/anion thing, I protonated both NH2 and then deprotenated the OH on the COOH
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    emailed edecel about the tetrahedral complex question
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    I said that there's less waste because that's what the passage said lol

    Well then I have no idea lol

    Uh no I can't remember, I just remember seeing loads of TM and benzene rings lmao
    Das the reason I didn't put it xD lel
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    Ohhh nah that's a by-product so we didn't even need to include it xD Btw u look familiar do I know u???
    yeah like I said, you just needed the intermediates Also, It think I know you.. Did we meet at the annual Cyka convention? Weren't you the guy who was boasting about how you got 7 week bans in 2 days??
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    Alright peeps well, I'm gonna go whilst I'm still feeling good about the exam lol. Got the big one tomorrow F215 2 hours of fun can't wait.

    Was good knowing all of you peace out chemistry bye bye.
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    (Original post by Hamzy45)
    For the 2-Nitrophenol and 4-Nitrophenol is it to do with the intermolecular hydrogen bonding and intramolecular hydrogen bonding? And also for the last questions do both cooh turn to coo- and both nh2 turn to nh3+
    Yea.
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    (Original post by lfcrules)
    dont think you need to put the equilibrium arrow do you????
    If not then your glasses would permanently look black XD
    (Original post by oShahpo)
    Methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate molecules are held together by (strong) London/ dispersion forces IGNORE Dipole forces and hydrogen bonds (1)Less / limited hydrogen bond betweenwater and methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (so sparingly soluble) (1) The hydrogen bonding between water molecules is (very) strong (1)Insufficient energy released to break hydrogen bonds in water/ London forces in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (1) (Some of the) hydrogen bonds are internal in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (1) The oxygens in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate can form hydrogen bonds to the hydrogens of water molecules OR The hydrogen on the oxygen in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate can form hydrogen bonds to the oxygens of water molecules (1)

    That's the mark scheme.
    This question is about solubility though.
    Lol well then
    Why does everybody seem to know intramolecular hydrogen bonding here, never thought or heard about it before lmao
    I said they both form London permanent dipole hydrogen bonds but 4 packs better and so stronger London forces. I don't think I get the mark then
    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    C0balt 'Twas just one reaction for the vanadium iodide ion thing right?
    Yeah
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    For the MC also for the numbers of isomers of the dinitromethylbenzene was the answer six... lol
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    (Original post by C0balt)
    If not then your glasses would permanently look black XD

    Lol well then
    Why does everybody seem to know intramolecular hydrogen bonding here, never thought or heard about it before lmao
    I said they both form London permanent dipole hydrogen bonds but 4 packs better and so stronger London forces. I don't think I get the mark then

    Yeah
    The question in the jan 2016 paper was preceeded by some information about the internal hydrogen bonding thing, so I would expect they'd expect you not to know about it and may give you at least a mark for talking about regular packing.
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    (Original post by oShahpo)
    The question in the jan 2016 paper was preceeded by some information about the internal hydrogen bonding thing, so I would expect they'd expect you not to know about it and may give you at least a mark for talking about regular packing.
    Oh okay, thats weird of them to expect us to know that then if they didn't expect it off IAL people.
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    In which step?
    Potassium dichromate.
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    (Original post by oShahpo)
    Methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate molecules are held together by (strong) London/ dispersion forces IGNORE Dipole forces and hydrogen bonds (1)Less / limited hydrogen bond betweenwater and methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (so sparingly soluble) (1) The hydrogen bonding between water molecules is (very) strong (1)Insufficient energy released to break hydrogen bonds in water/ London forces in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (1) (Some of the) hydrogen bonds are internal in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate (1) The oxygens in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate can form hydrogen bonds to the hydrogens of water molecules OR The hydrogen on the oxygen in methyl 2-hydroxybenzoate can form hydrogen bonds to the oxygens of water molecules (1)

    That's the mark scheme.
    This question is about solubility though.
    So instead the hydrogen bonding will need to reference other molecules of the same kind, not water, but that looks like the same kind of question
 
 
 
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