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    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Sorry my bad. Didn't realise that I didn't post the link lol

    https://c838cff4741acb48ae1ed62e5992...0Chemistry.pdf
    I haven't done the question for a while, but if not all of the reactants appear in the rate equation, which shows which reagents are in the rate determining step, then there must be another step in which the other reactant(s) react.
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    (Original post by tayloryeah)
    Attachment 546603

    is there a easy/ quick way of identifying which reactions are not bronsted lowry acid and bases ? please help x
    A bronsted lowry acid is a proton donor and a bronsted lowry base is a proton acceptor. In the first reaction, neither of the two reactants can donate or accept a proton, so this cannot be a bronsted lowry acid base reaction.
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    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Sorry my bad. Didn't realise that I didn't post the link lol

    https://c838cff4741acb48ae1ed62e5992...0Chemistry.pdf
    The powers of the reactants in the rate equation are the coefficients of the reactants in the rate determining step. Therefore if there are reagents not in the rds, or different numbers of the reagent than is suggested by the rate equation there must be other steps invloved
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    Wow already! Have you tried many IAL papers?
    I've done them all, actually prefer them they're a bit harder IMO

    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    how were your scores?
    Started off with Cs in both units now worked up to around full UMS
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    (Original post by Whizbox)
    I've done them all, actually prefer them they're a bit harder IMO



    Started off with Cs in both units now worked up to around full UMS
    Nice work haha !
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    Nice work haha !
    I think I remember you from the UKCAT thread? Where did you end up firming in the end?
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    (Original post by Whizbox)
    I think I remember you from the UKCAT thread? Where did you end up firming in the end?
    Yeah hahah I firmed Birmingham ! You?
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    (Original post by samb1234)
    The powers of the reactants in the rate equation are the coefficients of the reactants in the rate determining step. Therefore if there are reagents not in the rds, or different numbers of the reagent than is suggested by the rate equation there must be other steps invloved
    Thank you
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    (Original post by Spoderman14)
    I haven't done the question for a while, but if not all of the reactants appear in the rate equation, which shows which reagents are in the rate determining step, then there must be another step in which the other reactant(s) react.
    Got it! Thanks!
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    Yeah hahah I firmed Birmingham ! You?
    Firmed Cambridge insured Leeds, so won't even end up at a UKCAT uni haha. Where's your insurance?
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    (Original post by Whizbox)
    Firmed Cambridge insured Leeds, so won't even end up at a UKCAT uni haha. Where's your insurance?
    My insurance is King's
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    Nice work haha !
    Any advice on getting over 90% in past papers?
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    Any advice on getting over 90% in past papers?
    You'll have to ask someone else lol I'm only getting low As at the moment!
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    Whizbox
    Any advice on getting greater than 90% in past papers?

    Also if anyone can help with the below questions.

    The stronger the effect of the ligands then the greater the difference between the high and low energy d groups. Why is it that more electronegative ions such as F- have a greater ability to form a greater d-d energy gap? What the forces of attraction are at play that cause this.

    Also on a past paper ive just done it asks why is [FeF]3- colourless.

    They give 2 points
    1) energy gap is large
    2)the energy absorbed is outside the visible region.

    Is the 2nd a typo should it be energy transmitted is not in the visible region?

    Thanks in advance
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    samb1234 Is kinetic inertness the same thing as kinetic stability? I'm guessing it is?
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    (Original post by Don Pedro K.)
    samb1234 Is kinetic inertness the same thing as kinetic stability? I'm guessing it is?
    sort of. For example you might say that compound x has a very poor kinetic stability which is the only way it really differs - kinetic inertness is describing something very kinetically stable, whereas you could in theory use kinetic stability in more varied ways
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    (Original post by samb1234)
    sort of. For example you might say that compound x has a very poor kinetic stability which is the only way it really differs - kinetic inertness is describing something very kinetically stable, whereas you could in theory use kinetic stability in more varied ways
    ah okay Thanks.
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    Whizbox
    Any advice on getting greater than 90% in past papers?

    Also if anyone can help with the below questions.

    The stronger the effect of the ligands then the greater the difference between the high and low energy d groups. Why is it that more electronegative ions such as F- have a greater ability to form a greater d-d energy gap? What the forces of attraction at play that cause this.

    Also on a past ive just done it asks why is [FeF]3- colourless.

    They give 2 points
    1) energy gap is large
    2)the energy absorbed is outside the visible region.

    Is the 2nd a typo should it be enery emitted is not in the visible region?

    Thanks in advance
    No it isn't a typo. The colour for TM complexes come from them absorbing certain wavelengths of light to promote electrons, and hence the once 'white' light now is missing that certain wavelength so becomes coloured
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    (Original post by samb1234)
    No it isn't a typo. The colour for TM complexes come from them absorbing certain wavelengths of light to promote electrons, and hence the once 'white' light now is missing that certain wavelength so becomes coloured
    But the complex ion is seen to be colourless not coloured? And I thought that the colour seen is complementary to the frequency of wave being absorbed, So it should only be colourless as a complex ion if it absorbs those frequencies in the visible region?
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    But the complex ion is seen to be colourless not coloured? And I thought that the colour seen is complementary to the frequency of wave being absorbed, So it should only be colourless as a complex ion if it absorbs those frequencies in the visible region?
    I'm pretty sure the colour observed is comprised of the wavelengths of visible light transimitted (e.g. those not absorbed by the complex ion).
 
 
 
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