Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Considering going to Uni at 23. But is it really worth it? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Go to Uni?
    Yes
    15
    71.43%
    No
    2
    9.52%
    I didn't read the post, I just like polls
    4
    19.05%

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    So.

    When I was 18 I decided against going to Uni after sixth form, I don't regret that, I just wasn't ready, I didn't know what I wanted to do and I never really put any effort into seriously considering Uni.

    After a few years of working in various retail jobs I'm thinking maybe I need to give it a go. I currently work at Tesco and I have no desire to go higher in the company. I don't want to work in retail anymore, but I am unable to get a job which isn't in retail due to lack of experience. 23 isn't that old, but I feel like time is running out to start down a completely different career path. Plus, many people my age are married and have multiple children, something that makes going to Uni as a "mature student" tricky, I don't have any real ties? Is that the right word? You get what I mean.... Side note, I love that anyone over 21 is classed as a mature student, I feel like I should start looking at retirement homes too.

    But would Uni really help me? The debt genuinely frightens me, I know it shouldn't but it does. I don't want to spend 3 years and thousands of pounds just to end up in the same situation i'm in at the moment. Blame/praise my parents for bring me up with the idea that all loans and debt is evil and should be avoided. Even signing up to Netflix and Spotify freaked me out.

    I am passionate about film and TV, and would likely do a film production course, its a large area and it something I believe I would be good at. I have zero contacts and friends within this industry, I live in the north in a town full of builders and ex-miners, nowhere near any media related jobs. The Uni's i'm looking at are mainly in London, which has significantly more opportunities. The downside again being London is expensive as balls.

    The social life has never been a major appeal to me. Making new friends is cool, and I don't mind going out every now and again, but recently i turned down a night out because I preferred to watch Saturday Night Takeaway instead. So that kinda sums up that aspect.
    I've rambled on enough. If you've made it this far, thanks, perhaps you could share your opinion

    TLDR: Just another millennial going through a quarter-life crisis, typical eh?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I'd go for it if I was you, but as long as it will lead to a job. Not sure if is the case with film production courses?
    I'm all for education for the sake of simply the education, but with it now costing a significant amount you have to consider how much it will increase your job prospects as an investment.
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    You lost me when you said you preferred Saturday Night Takeaway.

    Do some research into film production, it might not ecven need a degree, but unless you figure out your alternate royte then a degree cna be part of a foot in the door. You might also learn stuff. You arent old at all, but as you say london and ding a degree is expensive, so be sure its what you want and has the chance of helping you to the career you want. Reasearch and networking to see what happens to people after.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I am currently facing the same dilemma. I've been told by people I know in the industry that a degree isn't necessary, but I think I would like to go to uni so AH
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Uni or apprenticeships seem to be the 2 options young people have. I recommend doing neither and finding your own way. Aim to become fully independent and discover what your passions are, then follow them.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Do some research into film production, it might not ecven need a degree, but unless you figure out your alternate royte then a degree cna be part of a foot in the door. You might also learn stuff. You arent old at all, but as you say london and ding a degree is expensive, so be sure its what you want and has the chance of helping you to the career you want. Reasearch and networking to see what happens to people after.
    I feel like I need the degree mostly to get contacts and to just have friends who are going through something similar. London has a heck of a lot more opportunities than other citys, and the Uni's there have good reputations, but the cost, blimey, it's quite something. The uni's I've been looking at seem to be good at getting graduates into employment, however this is never a guarantee of course.

    (Original post by hellodave5)
    I'd go for it if I was you, but as long as it will lead to a job. Not sure if is the case with film production courses?
    I'm all for education for the sake of simply the education, but with it now costing a significant amount you have to consider how much it will increase your job prospects as an investment.
    People have told me to ignore the costs, but it's around £19,000 a year that it will cost me. I know a student loan isn't a loan in the typical sense, and its pretty likely that I may never pay it back, but the thought of having a £57000 debt attached to me makes me feel sick.

    (Original post by LucyR96)
    I am currently facing the same dilemma. I've been told by people I know in the industry that a degree isn't necessary, but I think I would like to go to uni so AH
    The thing I've kinda learnt is that going straight into an industry and working your way up will also not guarantee of success. But perhaps that's just the reality of life, nothing is ever straight forward.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doogal)
    I feel like I need the degree mostly to get contacts and to just have friends who are going through something similar. London has a heck of a lot more opportunities than other citys, and the Uni's there have good reputations, but the cost, blimey, it's quite something. The uni's I've been looking at seem to be good at getting graduates into employment, however this is never a guarantee of course.



    People have told me to ignore the costs, but it's around £19,000 a year that it will cost me. I know a student loan isn't a loan in the typical sense, and its pretty likely that I may never pay it back, but the thought of having a £57000 debt attached to me makes me feel sick.



    The thing I've kinda learnt is that going straight into an industry and working your way up will also not guarantee of success. But perhaps that's just the reality of life, nothing is ever straight forward.
    try out different areas of work, ie work experience. Unless you're absolutely sure that film is for you. What subjects did you take at a level?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doogal)
    People have told me to ignore the costs, but it's around £19,000 a year that it will cost me. I know a student loan isn't a loan in the typical sense, and its pretty likely that I may never pay it back, but the thought of having a £57000 debt attached to me makes me feel sick.
    As a masters student (5th year at uni), my advice would be to consider the money/financial component very strongly.
    What jobs would you be looking at after graduation?

    Are there alternatives to university, which will result in similar pay progression and training and personal development?

    Costs a lot, so i think the decision is worthy of a lot of consideration.

    In my honest opinion, going to university is more or less the same as joining a gym and then doing competitions or something. You can still learn the same stuff and get to the same level, if you wish to, but lack the social motivational component and sort of 'paper' recognition that you would do, at the 'gym'.
    If you get a big expensive text book of say £60 cost, and a few smaller supplementary books... its likely more than you will learn in a degree. But I suppose a degree does give you a feel for an area, and the 'student experience'. That said, I suppose the degree would include things like essay skills etc. which may be more difficult to learn independently.

    But at your age of 23, I don't see uni being a problem. If anything, the maturation that comes with age will probably help you considerably.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I'm 23 and am considering going to University when I'm 24!! I've entered myself as an external candidate to sit AS-level Maths and Biology which I'm doing in the summer!! At our age, now is the time to do things that we might regret not doing when we're older and have family commitments etc! So go for it man!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doogal)
    So.

    When I was 18 I decided against going to Uni after sixth form, I don't regret that, I just wasn't ready, I didn't know what I wanted to do and I never really put any effort into seriously considering Uni.

    After a few years of working in various retail jobs I'm thinking maybe I need to give it a go. I currently work at Tesco and I have no desire to go higher in the company. I don't want to work in retail anymore, but I am unable to get a job which isn't in retail due to lack of experience. 23 isn't that old, but I feel like time is running out to start down a completely different career path. Plus, many people my age are married and have multiple children, something that makes going to Uni as a "mature student" tricky, I don't have any real ties? Is that the right word? You get what I mean.... Side note, I love that anyone over 21 is classed as a mature student, I feel like I should start looking at retirement homes too.

    But would Uni really help me? The debt genuinely frightens me, I know it shouldn't but it does. I don't want to spend 3 years and thousands of pounds just to end up in the same situation i'm in at the moment. Blame/praise my parents for bring me up with the idea that all loans and debt is evil and should be avoided. Even signing up to Netflix and Spotify freaked me out.

    I am passionate about film and TV, and would likely do a film production course, its a large area and it something I believe I would be good at. I have zero contacts and friends within this industry, I live in the north in a town full of builders and ex-miners, nowhere near any media related jobs. The Uni's i'm looking at are mainly in London, which has significantly more opportunities. The downside again being London is expensive as balls.

    The social life has never been a major appeal to me. Making new friends is cool, and I don't mind going out every now and again, but recently i turned down a night out because I preferred to watch Saturday Night Takeaway instead. So that kinda sums up that aspect.
    I've rambled on enough. If you've made it this far, thanks, perhaps you could share your opinion

    TLDR: Just another millennial going through a quarter-life crisis, typical eh?
    I'm 23 and I'm starting Journalism in September I had the same dilemma, to uni or do it on my own. I hate my 9-5 job and uni is an excuse to move to the city I love and excercise my brain again, I can't wait to have facilities like the library and teachers who can help instead of doing it on my own! I've just finished studying a self taught course, I did well but it was really hard.

    There is a lot of funding you can get, if you've been self supporting for 3 years they won't take your parents income into account for the maintenance loan so you should be able to get an alright one, I'm hoping I do anyway but I'm just waiting for my latest P60 to send off to them. Also if you decide in advance you can save a fair amount of money. Personally I want to just throw myself into the course and not have to work at the beginning so I'm saving enough for that, then I will probably get a part time job for a bit extra.You don't need to pay back the loan till your earning over £21,000 a year and even then it's like £10 a month, and if you don't get a job worth that much in that time they write it off. All the info is online

    Accommodation wise I've opted for house shares so I can be with older like minded people which I'd recommend too, personally I'm so much happier knowing I'm actually striving towards something I truly want to do, the thought of being stuck in this job/office/admin/purchasing role for the rest of my life working at a computer absolutely terrifies me!

    P.s. Brighton/Sussex Uni is where I'm going, similar vibe with the media related job and close to london

    P.s.s. you should start by trying to get involved in something on your own, Uni will teach you about what you should be doing but you'll have to go out and find work on your own - I've done the same I went from nowhere/nothing to applying to community radio I now do a show every week on the radio station and currently run a blog and some other bits and bobs which really helped me.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I'm also iffy about student debt, especially given that I initially started a degree back in 2009 when my debt would have been around £7000 a year rather than £14000 (I'm doing a £6000 a year course from September, so I know that my costs are lower than the average student these days). I'm 25 now and I'm choosing to study at degree level because I also need contacts for my area of interest, not to mention some practical training and experience. A degree can give you opportunities that would be difficult to come by yourself, especially if you're interested in something practical where contacts are essential. I'm actually happier with my degree choice now (I'm doing performing arts) than I was when I tried a degree the first time. My first degree was purely academic and I had no idea where it would take me or even where I wanted it to take me. If you have an idea in your head of a career I think it then makes much more sense to set off down the road of doing a degree because it feels as though you're doing it for a reason, which not only gives you the motivation to study and make the most of your time at university but it also makes the debt seem a little more bearable.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Nah it's not, in most cases a useless piece of paper which is worthless without experience, getting drunk will be necessary to cope with stress (or to just have a life basically) pile up a lot of debt and you'll probably be back in retail by the time you're 26, if you haven't been displaced by someone more experienced that is.

    Starting own business is way forward.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by whorace)
    Nah it's not, in most cases a useless piece of paper which is worthless without experience, getting drunk will be necessary to cope with stress (or to just have a life basically) pile up a lot of debt and you'll probably be back in retail by the time you're 26, if you haven't been displaced by someone more experienced that is.

    Starting own business is way forward.
    Because we all know that business people are well known for getting through life without getting drunk.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    Because we all know that business people are well known for getting through life without getting drunk.
    I do notice the irony now, if you took uni out and applied it to business my post would still make sense :lol:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Do some proper research into the industry you want to go in, find out what degrees the people who work in it have (if any at all). Just because the degree has the name of the industry you want to go into on it, it does not necessarily mean it is the right or best degree for you to do.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Doogal)
    So.

    When I was 18 I decided against going to Uni after sixth form, I don't regret that, I just wasn't ready, I didn't know what I wanted to do and I never really put any effort into seriously considering Uni.

    After a few years of working in various retail jobs I'm thinking maybe I need to give it a go. I currently work at Tesco and I have no desire to go higher in the company. I don't want to work in retail anymore, but I am unable to get a job which isn't in retail due to lack of experience. 23 isn't that old, but I feel like time is running out to start down a completely different career path. Plus, many people my age are married and have multiple children, something that makes going to Uni as a "mature student" tricky, I don't have any real ties? Is that the right word? You get what I mean.... Side note, I love that anyone over 21 is classed as a mature student, I feel like I should start looking at retirement homes too.

    But would Uni really help me? The debt genuinely frightens me, I know it shouldn't but it does. I don't want to spend 3 years and thousands of pounds just to end up in the same situation i'm in at the moment. Blame/praise my parents for bring me up with the idea that all loans and debt is evil and should be avoided. Even signing up to Netflix and Spotify freaked me out.

    I am passionate about film and TV, and would likely do a film production course, its a large area and it something I believe I would be good at. I have zero contacts and friends within this industry, I live in the north in a town full of builders and ex-miners, nowhere near any media related jobs. The Uni's i'm looking at are mainly in London, which has significantly more opportunities. The downside again being London is expensive as balls.

    The social life has never been a major appeal to me. Making new friends is cool, and I don't mind going out every now and again, but recently i turned down a night out because I preferred to watch Saturday Night Takeaway instead. So that kinda sums up that aspect.
    I've rambled on enough. If you've made it this far, thanks, perhaps you could share your opinion

    TLDR: Just another millennial going through a quarter-life crisis, typical eh?
    Sure uni isn't for everyone, but just having a degree opens a lot more doors, just having a degree.

    You can work several years in ALDI and one day become store manager or you can come out of uni with minimal experience and start managing ALDI stores - my point is just having a degree gives you lots of option career wise, you can do what you do now after etc, but it's just that option and not being stuck because you don't have a degree.

    That being said, a degree isn't easy and even harder if you're not interested in the subject, it's important to have an end goal if you want to get through it.

    In terms of debt, sure some other countries let you go to uni for free but in England you're quite privileged, if you're not earning over 21K a year, no one touches your money and even then you're looking at £500/600 a year coming out. I don't think this is something that should stop you if a degree is what you want.

    I'd try to figure out what you want/enjoy and figure out how to get there.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by whorace)
    Nah it's not, in most cases a useless piece of paper which is worthless without experience, getting drunk will be necessary to cope with stress (or to just have a life basically) pile up a lot of debt and you'll probably be back in retail by the time you're 26, if you haven't been displaced by someone more experienced that is.

    Starting own business is way forward.
    e: erm no it's not. i'd rather stress from deadlines than stress of going to same *****y work i hate everyday with next to little way out

    way forward is different for everyone, Personally i like the idea of security, my degree gives me that to a certain extent, I'd love to be an entrepreneur but not at the cost of serious stress because everything is make or break.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.