Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've just finished my second term studying English at Oxbridge (don't want to be too specific just in case anyone recognises me), and I can't stand it anymore. I don't know where the degree is taking me career wise, I can't bear to read anything, I hate every minute I spend on it. I got 3 A*s at A level, with 100%s in most of my exams. I have a really solid work ethic. But now I can't bear to do any of my degree work- I force myself to, because I don't want to fail, but it feels physically painful. I don't want to throw away a degree from Oxbridge- I got there from schools in special measures, and neither of my parents went to Uni, so I'd feel like I was throwing it back in their faces. I like the town, I like the societies, I like living there- but my course makes me feel like I'm drowning. I wish I'd done something heritage related like Archaeology, which I know I'd love- I've picked the wrong degree. Should I force myself through 2 more years of this or jump ship while I can?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Are you sure you want to do archeology? Because if it's something you've thought about for a while now I would recommend jumping ship.

    If you complete your degree, get job and so on. It will become harder for you to go back. I say this because you might have other responsibilities and going university again might not be practical. You might get stuck in a job which doesn't pay to bad , but you'll be miserable and always wondered what if. Do what your passionate about.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepishewe)
    I've just finished my second term studying English at Oxbridge (don't want to be too specific just in case anyone recognises me), and I can't stand it anymore. I don't know where the degree is taking me career wise, I can't bear to read anything, I hate every minute I spend on it. I got 3 A*s at A level, with 100%s in most of my exams. I have a really solid work ethic. But now I can't bear to do any of my degree work- I force myself to, because I don't want to fail, but it feels physically painful. I don't want to throw away a degree from Oxbridge- I got there from schools in special measures, and neither of my parents went to Uni, so I'd feel like I was throwing it back in their faces. I like the town, I like the societies, I like living there- but my course makes me feel like I'm drowning. I wish I'd done something heritage related like Archaeology, which I know I'd love- I've picked the wrong degree. Should I force myself through 2 more years of this or jump ship while I can?
    Should have thought more carefully about your career path before studying your degree. You can become a teacher afterwards.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sesshomaru24U)
    Are you sure you want to do archeology? Because if it's something you've thought about for a while now I would recommend jumping ship.

    If you complete your degree, get job and so on. It will become harder for you to go back. I say this because you might have other responsibilities and going university again might not be practical. You might get stuck in a job which doesn't pay to bad , but you'll be miserable and always wondered what if. Do what your passionate about.
    When I picked my degree I was really torn between archaeology and english, and went for english as the 'safe' option. I worry that the hatred I'm feeling for my degree now is being projected upon an idealised image of archaeology I've built up in my head, but at the moment I can't stand what I'm studying... and like you say, it's now or never funding wise etc- if I finish my degree I've lost my chance to change my mind.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by dmy15)
    Should have thought more carefully about your career path before studying your degree. You can become a teacher afterwards.
    haha yes, the English graduate always has teaching to fall back on To be fair I thought about career stuff and went along with the whole 'transferable skills, the world is your oyster' kind of approach, and now I'm doing the degree I feel a bit directionless, which is compounded by the fact that the degree itself feels pointless.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepishewe)
    haha yes, the English graduate always has teaching to fall back on To be fair I thought about career stuff and went along with the whole 'transferable skills, the world is your oyster' kind of approach, and now I'm doing the degree I feel a bit directionless, which is compounded by the fact that the degree itself feels pointless.
    To be fair, archeology is not that different in that respect. And not that different in career prospects too. Career prospects is the first factor you should consider.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Juichiro)
    To be fair, archeology is not that different in that respect. And not that different in career prospects too. Career prospects is the first factor you should consider.
    Yeah, I know what you mean. Neither are great career wise, I just think I'd be interested in a job in the heritage sector and archaeology would be more conducive to that. And I studied archaeology at A level and enjoyed it.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepishewe)
    Yeah, I know what you mean. Neither are great career wise, I just think I'd be interested in a job in the heritage sector and archaeology would be more conducive to that. And I studied archaeology at A level and enjoyed it.
    That's what my point is about. Whether you like it or not is irrelevant, what are the chances of you getting a job in that field? what are the steps to get a job in that field? Those are the questions you need to have fully answered before you decided to move into that field. Saying "I studied archaeology at A level and enjoyed it" is not relevant. Plenty of people passionate about a particular field spend half of their lives (before giving up) trying to break in saturated fields when they are more likely to win the lottery than break in the field without having their self-esteem destroyed in the process.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I did exactly the same as you - I picked what I thought was the 'safe' option with better employment rates but hated every minute of it. Luckily my uni did the course I actually wanted to do so, after speaking with my supervisor and both my current and target departments, they let me switch and I'm now doing my second first year. It's the best decision I ever made. Please, please, please talk to your academic supervisor/DoS/whoever is in charge of this kind of thing at your uni and talk through your options, get in touch with the department you want to switch to to see if they'll let you transfer etc. The worst that will happen is they'll say no and then you're back where you started. Whatever happens, I really would recommend switching to the thing you want to do rather than forcing yourself through a degree - I cannot express how much better I felt after I made the switch.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sheepishewe)
    When I picked my degree I was really torn between archaeology and english, and went for english as the 'safe' option. I worry that the hatred I'm feeling for my degree now is being projected upon an idealised image of archaeology I've built up in my head, but at the moment I can't stand what I'm studying... and like you say, it's now or never funding wise etc- if I finish my degree I've lost my chance to change my mind.

    Bit of a case of 'greener grass'?

    Parts of archaeology will also no doubt be dull.

    Career wise English makes a lot more sense. Teaching, publishing, advertising etc etc.


    Your heart isn't in it. Forcing yourself to continue probably won't yield great results.

    I say bite the bullet now while you still can.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I'd weigh up the pros and cons of switching, and then discuss with your tutor to see if you can- if you can't, nothing has been lost, and if you can, maybe you would have a nice degree experience.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    A degree is pointless if you do not receive any nourishment from it; seemingly this is true for you with your English degree. English actually ~can~ be one of the most inspiring and improving degrees. As E.M. Forster once said: "How do I know what I think until I see what I say?". I hope you find your flow soon, and don't hesitate to speak to your tutor/mentor about your doubts and desires. The sooner you plant the seed the more time it has to grow.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Study Helper
    (Original post by sheepishewe)
    I've just finished my second term studying English at Oxbridge (don't want to be too specific just in case anyone recognises me), and I can't stand it anymore. I don't know where the degree is taking me career wise, I can't bear to read anything, I hate every minute I spend on it. I got 3 A*s at A level, with 100%s in most of my exams. I have a really solid work ethic. But now I can't bear to do any of my degree work- I force myself to, because I don't want to fail, but it feels physically painful. I don't want to throw away a degree from Oxbridge- I got there from schools in special measures, and neither of my parents went to Uni, so I'd feel like I was throwing it back in their faces. I like the town, I like the societies, I like living there- but my course makes me feel like I'm drowning. I wish I'd done something heritage related like Archaeology, which I know I'd love- I've picked the wrong degree. Should I force myself through 2 more years of this or jump ship while I can?
    Have you considered the teaching? I mean I've heard that Oxbrige lecturers are not most nice - they just drown on (like most lecturers) but at least 80% of my lecturers make my course interesting, engaging and so well-worthwhile!

    However, if you really don't like your degree - change whilst you still can! I did that. Yes the extra 9K grand in debt is not helpful, and I've had my ups and downs at my present uni, but that's life. I've enjoyed my course a lot better than my previous one and I've made enough friends to actually consider true friends. All in all, if you ain't enjoying your degree, then you should really consider moving.

    It's not worth the solitude and misery honey.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    Have you considered the teaching? I mean I've heard that Oxbrige lecturers are not most nice - they just drown on (like most lecturers) but at least 80% of my lecturers make my course interesting, engaging and so well-worthwhile!

    However, if you really don't like your degree - change whilst you still can! I did that. Yes the extra 9K grand in debt is not helpful, and I've had my ups and downs at my present uni, but that's life. I've enjoyed my course a lot better than my previous one and I've made enough friends to actually consider true friends. All in all, if you ain't enjoying your degree, then you should really consider moving.

    It's not worth the solitude and misery honey.
    Thanks Did you change Uni entirely, or switch course and stay at the same Uni?
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    19
    Very Important Poster
    Change then. Dont you have a titor or counseling service who you can talk to. If its just the degree subject, then see if you cna get on another course. i wouldnt give Oxford up unless you dont like the place rather than the course. have a chat with the poster etheral world she has a blog about this as she switched.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    My friend's at Oxford and he decided he wanted to change his degree while in the middle of the second term. There was some red tape involved, he had an additional set of interviews, but he's going to get the degree he wants. In his case it was that he wanted to change from linguistics + language to PPL so the degrees are partially similar but still the university helped him with the process and enabled him to change degrees provided he did well in the interviews.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Should be relatively easy to switch. I'm at Oxford (Worcester) and there's a few people in my year that switched, one from history to english, and a couple to maths/philosophy from maths/physics I believe.You might have to do an extra year though but that's not a biggie. Tbh loads of people hate their degrees at the start, as you progress you'll be able to make your study much more specific to your interests, and most people actually enjoy writing their dissertation and stuff in the end! Good luck!
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    If you were anywhere else but Oxford, I'd advise you to leave while you've still got 3 more years of student finance and some of your sanity. I felt like you in my first year and stayed with it until 3rd year. Awful, awful 3 years. Hated it all. Looking back, I can't get those 3 years back again and I haven't used my degree so all in all it was pointless putting myself through it. At time I just didn't want to be a quitter and I thought it could lead to something even though I had no idea what. I'm going back to do an entirely different degree, 3 years since graduating with a clear focus on a career and in a subject I enjoy.

    The only thing that makes me hesitate to tell you to leave is simply that it's Oxford. I've got no idea how exactly people from Oxbridge with BAs in non-vocational subjects wind up with offers for highly paid grad jobs - but a lot of them seem to. Meanwhile, grads from my type of uni (ranked mid 40's) rarely land jobs like that. So there could be better prospects for you. Depends if you're interested in the types of jobs available though and if you're willing to put yourself through this for 2 more years. A lot of people will tell you that it's not a long time in the grand scheme of things - but it feels like eternity when you hate it. I personally couldn't do it again and if I knew then what I know now, I would leave and start another degree or transfer.

    Just do what makes you happy and what feels right - not put yourself through something that makes you miserable.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by somethingbeautiful)
    If you were anywhere else but Oxford, I'd advise you to leave while you've still got 3 more years of student finance and some of your sanity. I felt like you in my first year and stayed with it until 3rd year. Awful, awful 3 years. Hated it all. Looking back, I can't get those 3 years back again.
    Oh wow, I know how you feel. But I'm in the middle of a degree at Oxford which is four years long,and had doubts about it within the first two terms. I was told to wait until I'd taken my first set of proper exams, and then see how I felt... by which time I was told it was too late to change. The last three years have been some of the most agonising three years of my life. And I don't even want my degree.

    The thing is, I genuinely love Oxford - the people, the music, the theatre, etc. But my degree is turning me into a lifeless husk.

    So, my advice to the above - change. Just change.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Study Helper
    (Original post by sheepishewe)
    Thanks Did you change Uni entirely, or switch course and stay at the same Uni?
    I switched uni and had to redo first year because I couldn't carry half of my modules over to the new uni. Very annoying!

    But I always just think some of the friends I've made and the amazing experience I would not have even been possible without the move.

    It will open up so many doors. So I say, if you're not happy with where you are, definitely move.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.