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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    I consider myself more of a carer than a friend, I concede. But in the operation of my altruistic duties, I am confident friendship can develop.

    But back to my point, you are not exactly in a position to be telling people whether or not they have it in them to go to university. After all, you don't go to one anyway.
    I'm actually glad that you just said that. Because that means that you don't know me in real life.

    Because if you did, you would know how hard i've worked these last five years to get my near undergraduate degree!??
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    (Original post by john2054)
    I'm actually glad that you just said that. Because that means that you don't know me in real life.

    Because if you did, you would know how hard i've worked these last five years to get my near undergraduate degree!??
    You should put an asterisk on the end of that, methinks.
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    "My near undergraduate degree*!?

    *From Derby"
    It's all cool, though. Just settle down giving people the impression that you know anything about serious higher education.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    False. Law is open to those who studied law and non-law subjects, the competition is intense. Law doesn't lead to a certain career any more than Maths does.
    Law and teaching degrees are directly related to their respective professions. I think that is what the poster was saying, rather than intimating that only BAs in Educational Studies can get into teaching or that only LLBs can get into law.
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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    Law and teaching degrees are directly related to their respective professions. I think that is what the poster was saying, rather than intimating that only BAs in Educational Studies can get into teaching or that only LLBs can get into law.
    Law doesn't guarantee you or qualify you to be a solicitor/barrister. However a teaching (i.e. PGCE or QTS-certificated) degree does qualify you to teach. That was my point with picking out Law.

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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    Law and teaching degrees are directly related to their respective professions. I think that is what the poster was saying, rather than intimating that only BAs in Educational Studies can get into teaching or that only LLBs can get into law.
    this

    a bachelor's degree in education is known as a b.ed., not a b.a. just saying...
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    As currently a fourth year student who went on placement year, and is currently sobbing over her results section of her dissertation, I feel you bro :emo:

    A Psychology undergraduate is meaningless without further study.
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    (Original post by Gwilym101)
    Aside from Medicine, Teaching and possible Law. No degree leads straight into a job, trust me I've learnt that with depressing levels of repetition. Any job that needs a degree to do, will need MORE than just a degree to do. Placement year helps but there are other avenues to explore, volunteering, shadowing, working as an assistant, internships.
    Law is no different.

    The point is, there is a clear difference between vocational and academic degrees. What most people don't realise, is that the vast majority of psychology degrees are academic, with school's placing a very heavy emphasis on research, rather than applied psychology (clinical/ educational etc). I believe the BPS are beginning to change that, and are starting to place more of an emphasis on clinical psychology in their undergraduate requirements, but the degree is still heavily based on research. Which I admit I do like, but it does lead to a lot of misguidance between what the public perceive a psychology degree (even employers) entails and what it actual entails.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    this

    a bachelor's degree in education is known as a b.ed., not a b.a. just saying...
    What on earth are you talking about? You come onto these threads to give nonsensical corrections, and for what? Quiet, for the love of God.

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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Law is no different.

    The point is, there is a clear difference between vocational and academic degrees. What most people don't realise, is that the vast majority of psychology degrees are academic, with school's placing a very heavy emphasis on research, rather than applied psychology (clinical/ educational etc). I believe the BPS are beginning to change that, and are starting to place more of an emphasis on clinical psychology in their undergraduate requirements, but the degree is still heavily based on research. Which I admit I do like, but it does lead to a lot of misguidance between what the public perceive a psychology degree (even employers) entails and what it actual entails.
    Law is a little bit different.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    False. Law is open to those who studied law and non-law subjects, the competition is intense. Law doesn't lead to a certain career any more than Maths does.


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    Fair enough, I wasn't sure about Law but the point I was making is that most degrees don't directly lead into work.
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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    Law is a little bit different.
    No it is not.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    No it is not.
    What would you know?
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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    What would you know?
    Excuse me?

    I was expecting you to provide a reason as to why law is "a little bit different" not such a childish retort as that?


    So why, is law a little bit different?
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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    What on earth are you talking about? You come onto these threads to give nonsensical corrections, and for what? Quiet, for the love of God.
    That's rude and unjustified.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Psychology graduates seem to have this issue, as it is a jack of all trades, master of none qualification. But this is also a great strength as has been mentioned by Princepieman, as well as a weakness in that it doesn't lead directly to a job.

    I'll give you my experiences so far.I completed a psychology degree, but didn't enjoy it all that much at the time. Ended up on the masters in neuroscience (clinical context).
    Working as a support worker part time, low wages ultimately for a graduate. Better part time jobs out there though, but hard to get in this climate.
    Doing placement in head injuries. Have volunteered for hospitals etc in past. Thinking about clinical psychology doctorate to specialise in neuropsychology ( 3 years + 1), or medical degree (4-5 years).

    Psychology professional doctorates are perhaps one of the most competitive courses out there, so you can only try and increase your chances.

    Ultimately, with psychology, you end up playing a long game. You don't get payback very soon, but there is room to do pretty well in the long term.


    It can be used to get into anything from robotics and AI, marketing and neuromarketing, nursing, medicine, biomedical and pharma research, teaching, therapy, statistics, psychologist and all specialisms of it, coaching, law, politics, police investigation...


    Unfortunately I don't know much about the requirements for forensic psych. so can't advise there.
    Hi, can I ask, did you go straight into a masters after you graduated? I need to take a year out to save money, and to be honest I've only just realised that I do actually want to do a masters.... Do you think a year out will effect my chances?

    Also, if you don't mind me asking, what did you graduate with?
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Hi, can I ask, did you go straight into a masters after you graduated? I need to take a year out to save money, and to be honest I've only just realised that I do actually want to do a masters.... Do you think a year out will effect my chances?

    Also, if you don't mind me asking, what did you graduate with?
    I went straight into a masters, having a part time job to pay the bills. Though I'm not sure I would suggest this. It may be better to take the year out. Unless you can be very specific in how many hours you can or are willing to work. I have ended up doing 30-40 hours some weeks, alongside masters work. The result has been relatively low-modest grades for the most part for my work.

    Year out shouldn't effect chances at all. May even help them, if use the time to build on yourself.

    I graduated with a first class degree. Well I say first, but its 69.2%. So a first, by .2%. Was lucky.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Excuse me?

    I was expecting you to provide a reason as to why law is "a little bit different" not such a childish retort as that?


    So why, is law a little bit different?
    Why should I be expected to provide a reasoned argument when you twice made the same assertion without providing a hint of argument?

    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    That's rude and unjustified.
    What is rude is to come onto threads, repeatedly, and tell people they're not cut out for uni. He has done it repeatedly. Again, if you're not wholly familiar with something, refrain from commenting.
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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    Why should I be expected to provide a reasoned argument when you twice made the same assertion without providing a hint of argument?



    What is rude is to come onto threads, repeatedly, and tell people they're not cut out for uni. He has done it repeatedly. Again, if you're not wholly familiar with something, refrain from commenting.

    Here is my argument then, law is not different to psychology in that an undergraduate degree in law is purely academic. You gain theoretical, and not practical (or very little) insight and knowledge into law. Just like a psychology degree does not provide you with practical training to become a clinical psych, an undergraduate law degree does not provide you with hands on training to become a barrister.

    Feel free to tell me if I'm wrong. Why do you think it is different in that regard?
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    Here is my argument then, law is not different to psychology in that an undergraduate degree in law is purely academic. You gain theoretical, and not practical (or very little) insight and knowledge into law. Just like a psychology degree does not provide you with practical training to become a clinical psych, an undergraduate law degree does not provide you with hands on training to become a barrister.

    Feel free to tell me if I'm wrong. Why do you think it is different in that regard?
    My issue is how do you know it offers little insight into the practical? As you're coming from psychology, I am not too sure you know the legal curriculum too well. This is not an insult, per se. I am just explaining that it is difficult to understand a subject's content if you don't study it.

    It is correct that a law degree doesn't get people to the Bar in and of itself, but it is wrong to say that that law isn't practical. It's a subject largely assessed by problem questions which require students to give practical legal advice to hypothetical clients. It's also a subject which deals almost exclusively with practical areas of law. In psychology you might have two subjects relevant to counselling; in law all subjects are relevant to the legal profession. Not true for people who take jurisprudence and "women and the law", but still the vast majority of legal modules will provide theoretical and practical insight. Most unis offer professional skills modules, usually obligatory, as well. Law is a lil different.
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    (Original post by Nameless Ghoul)
    My issue is how do you know it offers little insight into the practical? As you're coming from psychology, I am not too sure you know the legal curriculum too well. This is not an insult, per se. I am just explaining that it is difficult to understand a subject's content if you don't study it.

    It is correct that a law degree doesn't get people to the Bar in and of itself, but it is wrong to say that that law isn't practical. It's a subject largely assessed by problem questions which require students to give practical legal advice to hypothetical clients. It's also a subject which deals almost exclusively with practical areas of law. In psychology you might have two subjects relevant to counselling; in law all subjects are relevant to the legal profession. Not true for people who take jurisprudence and "women and the law", but still the vast majority of legal modules will provide theoretical and practical insight. Most unis offer professional skills modules, usually obligatory, as well. Law is a lil different.

    Oh dear, I love how you criticised me for not knowing about law, (which is fair enough!) but then you proceed to talk about psychology when similarly you know nothing about it.

    Counselling is very different to psychology, we would never learn about counselling in psychology. We do learn about some specific psychological therapies such as systemic therapy, or cognitive behavioural therapy, alongside medical therapies. But not as a stand alone module, it's merely discussed as an application of academic research. More how increased understanding of such and such behaviour/ mental processes has been applied to this setting, but we don't learn how to go about it.

    ... It depresses me that people think counselling and the psychology is the same :emo:


    Well I did ask you to explain, you could have told me that from the offset, but we got there in the end. It seemingly is more practical than I thought, I thought it was a purely academic discipline.
 
 
 
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