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Need a doctor's note for uni watch

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    I've never had to get a doctor's note before (nor have I even been to the doctors in the last 5+ years). I had a migraine that caused me to miss a practical class today worth 5% of my grade. I've been asked to complete an extenuating circumstances form with evidence. I had a bad migraine triggered by stress so I couldn't drive into uni nor could I make the 2 hour journey utilising public transport to get there.

    I didn't know I would need to fill in a form until this evening and I'm now fine, what do I do about evidence?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've never had to get a doctor's note before (nor have I even been to the doctors in the last 5+ years). I had a migraine that caused me to miss a practical class today worth 5% of my grade. I've been asked to complete an extenuating circumstances form with evidence. I had a bad migraine triggered by stress so I couldn't drive into uni nor could I make the 2 hour journey utilising public transport to get there.

    I didn't know I would need to fill in a form until this evening and I'm now fine, what do I do about evidence?
    Go to your Gp for a note, theres no other way of getting any evidence
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    You can self-certify for 7 days by law. This should be sufficient.

    Going to your GP for a retrospective illness simply for a sick note is a massive waste of time for everyone involved. Ultimately your GP would be taking your word for it as your university would if they accepted a self-certification.

    Has your university specifically stated that they want a sick note?
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    You can self-certify for 7 days by law. This should be sufficient.

    Going to your GP for a retrospective illness simply for a sick note is a massive waste of time for everyone involved. Ultimately your GP would be taking your word for it as your university would if they accepted a self-certification.

    Has your university specifically stated that they want a sick note?
    Does this law cover universities though? I know it does for work but didn't know it's the case for uni students as well? I understand the complete waste of time it is for doctors and I'd rather not do the form in the first place, I didn't attend in full-knowledge of the fact I'd lose out on the 5% on my grade, I just didn't expect them to ask for me to full in a form.

    Basically the module convenor said I need to fill the form in so she can omit me from the practical coursework going towards my final grade by getting my absence officially authorised. For it to be authorised by the head of my department it needs evidence i.e. a doctor's note.
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    That makes no sense. You won't be able to see your GP and get a note for an illness you had today. Obviously, it might be dfferent if it's an ongoing problem.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    That makes no sense. You won't be able to see your GP and get a note for an illness you had today. Obviously, it might be dfferent if it's an ongoing problem.
    Tbh these requirements sometimes are nonsensical. OP you'll just need to go to your GP and hope they're sympathetic.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    That makes no sense. You won't be able to see your GP and get a note for an illness you had today. Obviously, it might be dfferent if it's an ongoing problem.
    Surely OP could give the symptoms they had, tell the GP what happened, and they might be willing to write them a note?

    Not actually much different to reporting the symptoms as they are happening.

    If the university requires a GP note, then OP should surely try to get one? I certainly wouldn't consider that a "waste of time" at all, as was claimed by someone else.
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    Yes you cna self certify you were ill, but thats for employment law.
    You have a problem. How do you know it was a migraine? You havent been to the Drs in 5 years, which presumably means you arent receiving treatment and could be making it up and thye have to believe you retropsectively. I cna imaine a Dr who has never met you will be reluctant, but if you manage it right, then you have a chance.

    You need to ask them if they would or could give you a note and then you need to describe the symptoms of the migraine to them so they can at least recognise what you had. Obviously voimiting, pain and incapacitation would be a good start. there is a way they can word it if they are willing. Tbh you should have gone beforehand and also you should have alerted the uni beforehand as retrospectively looks supicious. Think about it and negotiate with them its pot luck whether you get someone sympathetic.

    You might as well have a try to get one and if one Dr wont give it you then go to another. 5% is worth fighting for and you could maybe ask for a compromise i.e a chance to sit the exam at a different date. Hopefully you already have good attendance and good grades.

    Good luck, but really you should have dragged yourself to the GP before.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Surely OP could give the symptoms they had, tell the GP what happened, and they might be willing to write them a note?

    Not actually much different to reporting the symptoms as they are happening.

    If the university requires a GP note, then OP should surely try to get one? I certainly wouldn't consider that a "waste of time" at all, as was claimed by someone else.

    Whilsy i agree with most of your post a note retrospectively confirming what someone else is telling them is very different from a note which confirms what the GP can confirm for themselves and is present at the time of writing the note.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Whilsy i agree with most of your post a note retrospectively confirming what someone else is telling them is very different from a note which confirms what the GP can confirm for themselves and is present at the time of writing the note.
    Yes, I can see what you mean, but surely lots of people don't actually have observable symptoms when in a GP consultation?

    Eg a consultation about abdominal pain, the GP can't actually see anything for themselves. Or a consultation about a mental health problem - the person could be completely lying.

    Even if the GP spoke to someone when they were having a migraine, how is that any different from taking a history from them afterwards? Is "I have a headache now" any more believable than "I had a headache yesterday"?

    I imagine going through the GP would give this more legitimacy to the university, because the GP can listen to the symptoms and is medically trained to interpret them. That is, if the GP is willing to write a note based on a retrospective description.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    That makes no sense. You won't be able to see your GP and get a note for an illness you had today. Obviously, it might be dfferent if it's an ongoing problem.
    That depends on the doctor. If you explain the situation to them, and the effect this has had on your studies, I think my GP would be prepared to write me a note like this retroactively. However if you have never been to the gp's, you may well not even know who your gp is, and then it will make it more difficult getting him or her to write you a sick note, let alone a retroactive one!
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Yes, I can see what you mean, but surely lots of people don't actually have observable symptoms when in a GP consultation?

    Eg a consultation about abdominal pain, the GP can't actually see anything for themselves. Or a consultation about a mental health problem - the person could be completely lying.

    Even if the GP spoke to someone when they were having a migraine, how is that any different from taking a history from them afterwards? Is "I have a headache now" any more believable than "I had a headache yesterday"?

    I imagine going through the GP would give this more legitimacy to the university, because the GP can listen to the symptoms and is medically trained to interpret them. That is, if the GP is willing to write a note based on a retrospective description.
    They could be lying, but if you have a migraine then you cna display symptoms plus the GP is there and can write a note which says this person came o my surgery with X symptoms which matched a migraine and I adbised her the best course of action was to go home and rest. It would have been impractical for her to risk driving or particpate in an examination.

    The other note he is simply writing what the OP tells him without observing anything himself. the dept will see the difference, they arent stupid.
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    A nurse can diagnose a migraine. Go to them rather than wasting the GP's time.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    A nurse can diagnose a migraine. Go to them rather than wasting the GP's time.
    Getting a medical letter for a health-related problem is not a waste of a GP's time.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    They could be lying, but if you have a migraine then you cna display symptoms plus the GP is there and can write a note which says this person came o my surgery with X symptoms which matched a migraine and I adbised her the best course of action was to go home and rest. It would have been impractical for her to risk driving or particpate in an examination.

    The other note he is simply writing what the OP tells him without observing anything himself. the dept will see the difference, they arent stupid.
    So what if someone had a headache without any observable signs? A migraine won't always have signs anyway.

    Whilst I agree that the university may draw a distinction, I honestly cannot see any difference (assuming the headache had no observable signs). It is just as easy to lie about something in the present as lie about something in the past.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    So what if someone had a headache without any observable signs? A migraine won't always have signs anyway.

    Whilst I agree that the university may draw a distinction, I honestly cannot see any difference (assuming the headache had no observable signs). It is just as easy to lie about something in the present as lie about something in the past.
    Do you get migraines?

    Ofc the OP coild lie, but the Dr is more capable of recognising a lie basd on I jhave x condition now as opposed to being asked to support the fact I had x condition yesterday. Im shocked you cant see the difference. The uni will notice the difference between the notes.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Do you get migraines?
    Nope.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Nope.
    There are different types of migraines and different severities of atack. its much more than just a headache. If her claim is she could not attend an exam then she would have to be describing some pretty substantial symptoms.
    Visual impairment, vomiting, nausea, extreme sensitivity to light and noise as well as a particular sort of headache.

    More severe, more symtoms the more authortive the Drs note can be.
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    I confirm this student came to me and I confirm she told me she had a migraine yesterday.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    There are different types of migraines and different severities of atack. its much more than just a headache. If her claim is she could not attend an exam then she would have to be describing some pretty substantial symptoms.
    Visual impairment, vomiting, nausea, extreme sensitivity to light and noise as well as a particular sort of headache.

    More severe, more symtoms the more authortive the Drs note can be.
    Not

    I confirm this student came to me and I confirm she told me she had a migraine yesterday.
    I understand all that. But most of that stuff is self-report, isn't it? Stuff like the character of the headache, nausea, whether they vomited. Photophobia can be observed but isn't always present anyway.

    Essentially, I definitely do agree that the GP and Uni may not take kindly to this being retrospective, but I can't myself see much logic for them drawing a distinction.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    I understand all that. But most of that stuff is self-report, isn't it? Stuff like the character of the headache, nausea, whether they vomited. Photophobia can be observed but isn't always present anyway.

    Essentially, I definitely do agree that the GP and Uni may not take kindly to this being retrospective, but I can't myself see much logic for them drawing a distinction.
    Theres a big difference between being at the scene of an accident yourself and having someon explaining it to you.

    I think you cna tell whether a person is actually undergoing an attack or faking it. Even if she was faking it she had the advantage of saying she was at the GPs rather than it being an unsual afterthought.

    The Uni will see the difference, the dr will see the difference , even if you cant.
 
 
 
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