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Need a doctor's note for uni Watch

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    Migraine is different for everyone. As a teenager, I had aura. Currently, I get no warning at all. They can come on very quickly too. Mine are pretty much instant.

    Most of the time, it's not worth visiting a GP for. I've only had to go because mine are a long term thing and I've had some which can last for days, even with the medication they give.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    She could have caught the bus or a cab. The point is in her evidence note she can say that and they can verify she tried to go through official channels, at the moment she just self certified, which is weaker. I would/could have dragged myself there.

    Most people go through a pre phase. I can tell when one is coming on. If you have a lot you cna sense hwo your body is changing.
    https://www.migrainetrust.org/about-...ms-and-stages/
    http://www.achenet.org/resources/mig...e_four_phases/
    https://migraine.com/migraine-basics/migraine-phases/

    Whether she could have done that depends on how severe the migraine was.

    I certainly could not leave the house with one of mine. It would not be safe and it would be ridiculous for me to do so.

    Just because a lot of people do does not mean this person nececcasrily knew theirs was coming on.

    And again ignores the fact she probably couldn't have gotten a same day appointment anyway.

    I don't know. I just think the system for illness verification is a bit stupid. On the one hand I can understand it's to stop people lying and getting away with it, but on the other hand it can ve very unreasonable and difficult to prove you were ill even if you were when it comes to:

    1) being able to actually go the doctors on that day depending on severity of illness.

    2) even being able to get an appointment during the time of illness

    3) whether your GP will give you a back dated sick note if you couldn't or didn't go to the doctors at the time of illness, many GPs will refuse.
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    We dont know the situation, so its hard to tell.
    We dont know what type of migraine she gets, but she could have rung the GP and if she couldnt get through speak to the nurse or practice manager.

    Tbh I would also have rung the lecturer and taken their advice. Contact with lecturer puts them on notice before you miss the exam.

    It gives me enough to show I had made an effort.

    You seem obssessed with the appointment whereas i think its important to show you were trying to do something., even if you didnt get an appointment that day, then it reads better and also gives you leverage on getting the sick note because you cna get the surgery to make a note of it and the fact they couldnt do same day.

    Im only interested in solving the problem and theres plenty you could do to make it easier and increae your chance of a note, then succssful claim for mitigating circumstances..
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    Ultimately, this is a culture that needs to be stopped at employer/university level.

    It's a massive waste of resources for GPs when employers should be accepting self-certification for short illnesses.

    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    I would hope so - St John Ambulance volunteers are fully permitted to recognise, medicate and discharge migraines without intervention.
    I wouldn't trust a SJA volunteer to put a plaster on properly.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    We dont know the situation, so its hard to tell.
    We dont know what type of migraine she gets, but she could have rung the GP and if she couldnt get through speak to the nurse or practice manager.

    Tbh I would also have rung the lecturer and taken their advice. Contact with lecturer puts them on notice before you miss the exam.

    It gives me enough to show I had made an effort.

    You seem obssessed with the appointment whereas i think its important to show you were trying to do something., even if you didnt get an appointment that day, then it reads better and also gives you leverage on getting the sick note because you cna get the surgery to make a note of it and the fact they couldnt do same day.

    Im only interested in solving the problem and theres plenty you could do to make it easier and increae your chance of a note, then succssful claim for mitigating circumstances..

    lol I'm not "obsessed" with the appointment. I just think it's silly to look at so black and white and straight forward, when in reality illness isn't like that.

    I didn't know you could get evidence just for asking for an appointment.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    lol I'm not "obsessed" with the appointment. I just think it's silly to look at so black and white and straight forward, when in reality illness isn't like that.

    I didn't know you could get evidence just for asking for an appointment.
    She has to write an explanation to the head of department. It has to satisfy him that its genuine and the situation warranted her not coming in.

    He either says yes or not so on that basis its absolutely black and white.

    Version 1. I had a migraine and was so ill I couldnt make it into uni.

    Version 2. I had a migraine and was very worried about missing the exam. I rang my lecturer as i realised I was too ill to come in and she informed me that I would need a Drs note. I then rang the get well surgery to book an emergency appointment, but they had none free, They confirmed that if i was too ill then I should go to bed in a dark room, until the attack had passed. I have a note to support this.

    Version 2. I had a migraine and was very worried about missing the exam. I rang my lecturer as i realised I was too ill to come in and she informed me that I would need a Drs note--- Goes to see Dr and gets reprtospective note.

    You are trying to follow a pattern of behaviour to show you arent faking it and shying off your exam.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    She has to write an explanation to the head of department. It has to satisfy him that its genuine and the situation warranted her not coming in.

    He either says yes or not so on that basis its absolutely black and white.

    Version 1. I had a migraine and was so ill I couldnt make it into uni.

    Version 2. I had a migraine and was very worried about missing the exam. I rang my lecturer as i realised I was too ill to come in and she informed me that I would need a Drs note. I then rang the get well surgery to book an emergency appointment, but they had none free, They confirmed that if i was too ill then I should go to bed in a dark room, until the attack had passed. I have a note to support this.

    Version 2. I had a migraine and was very worried about missing the exam. I rang my lecturer as i realised I was too ill to come in and she informed me that I would need a Drs note--- Goes to see Dr and gets reprtospective note.

    You are trying to follow a pattern of behaviour to show you arent faking it and shying off your exam.

    When I said it's not black and white I was talking about the illness itself and whether not not you can get an appointment or if the doctor will give you a retrospective note (and many will not).

    The university system is indeed very black and white yes. But that is not what I was talking about. Though that is part of the problem, some systems are so black and white it doesn't matter how much you show you tried to get an appointment or a sick note if you don't get one they don't care.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    When I said it's not black and white I was talking about the illness itself and whether not not you can get an appointment or if the doctor will give you a retrospective note (and many will not).

    The university system is indeed very black and white yes. But that is not what I was talking about.
    The whole thread is about the OP needing to get past the mitigating circs test.

    Dunno how long your migraines last, but they can be phased and last for an extended amount of time. They normally build, so in the early stages you are more physically capable.

    It doesnt matter too much whether you get an appointment or not.
    Weve already been over getting a retrospective note if you read the thread. Some will not, but some will. Perseverance and how you are careful in what you ask for make a difference.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    The whole thread is about the OP needing to get past the mitigating circs test.

    Dunno how long your migraines last, but they can be phased and last for an extended amount of time. They normally build, so in the early stages you are more physically capable.

    It doesnt matter too much whether you get an appointment or not.
    Weve already been over getting a retrospective note if you read the thread. Some will not, but some will. Perseverance and how you are careful in what you ask for make a difference.

    Yes I know what the thread is about.

    Usually around 12 hours. NOt everyone's builds and not everyone is physically capable in the early stages and we have no idea if the OP was so it's pointless continuing to assert that "most" people are. OP may not have been.

    Depends on your universities system. Yes I have read the thread, and the fact that some will not give a note is part of the problem. Especially if your uni system is so black and white that if there is no note then that's it case closed you were lying no extenuating circumstances granted regardless of how much you try to show you weren't (yes some are like this).

    Yes that makes a difference but again university policy makes this difficult yet again, in order to get a retrospective note you need to make an appointment to get one from your GP. And then if that GP refuses to give a note you have to make yet another appointment with a different GP. Making these appointments and trying to get these notes takes time, and pretty much every uni system for mitigating circumstances has a time cap on when you can gather the evidence. At my uni that time cap is 5 days. Which presents a problem if you simply cannot get an appointment with your GP to ask for a note within that time frame....which as I said before is likely when a lot of GPs are so over prescribed some people are waiting more than a week for appointments for non emergent issues.
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    Think your making it more complicated than it is.
    The OP could have made things easier for themselves, but they are stuck with things as they are. They arent the choices I would have made.
    The OP can go about things to improve her mitigating circs explanation, its up to her.

    I would explain and communicate with my lecturer and uni if there were difficulties. its just rules and procedure. I dont see problems just obstales to overcome and deal with. You cna only do th best you cna but again that would be reflected in the evidence note.
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    Thank you for all the responses. I'm still unsure what to do about this as submitting a form with no evidence seems a waste of time, so I'm not sure whether to reply to my lecturer saying I won't be submitting a form and will accept a zero. I'm only first year so 5% won't affect me much.

    I did email in the morning before the practical, but as the practical ran for the whole day with different groups, the lecturer didn't respond until after 4pm telling me I need to do the form which is too late in the day to book an appointment.

    I rang my doctor's surgery the next day and they said that they don't do retrospective sick notes and I need to self-certify for the first 7 days of an illness. They won't do a letter as it's not on my medical records and that would have taken two weeks to do anyway (past the dead line). They also said you can't make an appointment every time you get a migraine, you treat it with over-the-counter meds.

    What do you recommend I do? Submit a form with no evidence, email my lecturer or do nothing and assume it all is forgotten about and I just get a zero. I'm in the midst of exams and assignment deadlines and I just don't have the mental capacity to stress over this at the moment.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you for all the responses. I'm still unsure what to do about this as submitting a form with no evidence seems a waste of time, so I'm not sure whether to reply to my lecturer saying I won't be submitting a form and will accept a zero. I'm only first year so 5% won't affect me much.

    I did email in the morning before the practical, but as the practical ran for the whole day with different groups, the lecturer didn't respond until after 4pm telling me I need to do the form which is too late in the day to book an appointment.

    I rang my doctor's surgery the next day and they said that they don't do retrospective sick notes and I need to self-certify for the first 7 days of an illness. They won't do a letter as it's not on my medical records and that would have taken two weeks to do anyway (past the dead line). They also said you can't make an appointment every time you get a migraine, you treat it with over-the-counter meds.

    What do you recommend I do? Submit a form with no evidence, email my lecturer or do nothing and assume it all is forgotten about and I just get a zero. I'm in the midst of exams and assignment deadlines and I just don't have the mental capacity to stress over this at the moment.
    1. You should submit a form becayse all they cna do is say no.
    2. > no need to spend tons of time on it.
    3. Say it as events happened.

    You got a migraine. You were very ill- describe symptoms especially how they made you unable to atend. describe in detail just how ill you were.

    Mention you did send an e-mail to your lecturer (follow up with phone would have been better) before the exam- you cna use a copy which will be time stamped. She didnt get back till after the exam and in any event the migraine was at its height by then.

    She suggested you get a Drs note. You were too ill to have attanded surgery at the time of the attack. Upon contacting the surgery (date and address) they advised you that they wouldnt have given you a sick note and self certification is what they suggest. You have done as they suggested and attach a copy of a self certified sick note. either make your own up or find a pro forma as there is no standard, just include date sicke=ness started, what it was, date ended.

    heres one
    https://www.gov.uk/government/public...f-sickness-sc2

    Just get it done and forget about it. the key imo is write it with attention to detail, take it seriously and fight your corner, then you might get away with it. If you are worried talk to your lecturer. If you have food attendance and marks then you might wnat to make reference to that to show how out of character it was to miss a day.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thank you for all the responses. I'm still unsure what to do about this as submitting a form with no evidence seems a waste of time, so I'm not sure whether to reply to my lecturer saying I won't be submitting a form and will accept a zero. I'm only first year so 5% won't affect me much.

    I did email in the morning before the practical, but as the practical ran for the whole day with different groups, the lecturer didn't respond until after 4pm telling me I need to do the form which is too late in the day to book an appointment.

    I rang my doctor's surgery the next day and they said that they don't do retrospective sick notes and I need to self-certify for the first 7 days of an illness. They won't do a letter as it's not on my medical records and that would have taken two weeks to do anyway (past the dead line). They also said you can't make an appointment every time you get a migraine, you treat it with over-the-counter meds.

    What do you recommend I do? Submit a form with no evidence, email my lecturer or do nothing and assume it all is forgotten about and I just get a zero. I'm in the midst of exams and assignment deadlines and I just don't have the mental capacity to stress over this at the moment.
    Good to know that you're only in first year so this won't be a major deal. Treat this as a learning experience

    For now, yes email your lecturer. Explain that you were unaware of the requirements and did not attend the doctors. Apologise. Say exactly what happened and how it affected you - how it would have been impossible to even travel in, let alone do the practical, with reference to your specific symptoms. Ask if there's anything you can do to make up the marks. Expect him to say no. Submit the form because the worst they can do is say no. But again, expect it to be rejected.

    And just remember for next time: the moment you get anything so much as a sniffle before an exam, HAUL ASS to the doctor's. If you can't travel there, explain your circumstance and beg the secretaries for a phone consultation. If you can get there but can't get an appointment, explain your situation and beg just to just be PHYSICALLY SEEN by a doctor so they can see that in that exact moment you are not well.

    After this year exams are serious business, so don't make the same mistake again!
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I wouldn't trust a SJA volunteer to put a plaster on properly.
    That depends on the volunteer. Over half my unit works in a healthcare setting, plenty of people are student paras/nurses (though there's no slide for that, so it only shows as 'first aider'). We get easily an hour's training on correct plaster application.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    That depends on the volunteer. Over half my unit works in a healthcare setting, plenty of people are student paras/nurses (though there's no slide for that, so it only shows as 'first aider'. We get easily an hour's training on correct plaster application.
    Again, people who shouldn't really be diagnosing or 'medicating' (beyond paracetamol) anyone.

    First aid volunteers are great at performing bystander chest compressions before an ambulance arrives, but that's about it really.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Again, people who shouldn't really be diagnosing or 'medicating' (beyond paracetamol) anyone.

    First aid volunteers are great at performing bystander chest compressions before an ambulance arrives, but that's about it really.
    A 3rd year student para isn't qualified to diagnose something simple and make a decision to discharge/refer/transport? Yet an ambulance tech (with 12 weeks training) is?
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I personally would feel uncomfortable writing a retrospective sick note. And I do feel as though it's a waste of resources having to pander to a university that is being awkward rather than treating its students like adults.
    I agree a waste of resources but GPs are asked to do this frequently.

    Technically it's a private letter or private sick note as under 7 days of illness and so the surgery can decline to do it at all. At places I've worked the best we could do in this situation would be a 1-2 liner "This patient tells me that..." & charge for it. It could be requested via Reception or a telephone slot rather than wasting a face to face appointment unless there was any ongoing medical issue.

    Without having seen you at the time or a history of migraines on your records I'm not very convinced a "the patient tells me" letter is really much evidence at all, but if the practice as a whole are willing to do it as a private service & it ticks another box somewhere then I don't feel uncomfortable doing them...
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    A 3rd year student para isn't qualified to diagnose something simple and make a decision to discharge/refer/transport? Yet an ambulance tech (with 12 weeks training) is?
    Deciding to discharge/transport =/= making a diagnosis, especially when the threshold of transporting is so low ("just to be on the safe side").
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    I'm submitting it tomorrow. I've written my symptoms and how that meant I couldn't get in nor could have done the practical if I had been in. I said I emailed and then went to sleep as that's the only thing that helps, then I said that I didn't go to the doctors as I wasn't aware I would need medical evidence at the time.

    Is that ok? I think because it's only a minor piece of coursework it's handled in my department rather than further up. Put they do say on the policy that retrospective and self-certifying evidence doesn't count anyway so paying £30 for a retrospective doctor's note would have been pointless.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Yes I know what the thread is about.

    Usually around 12 hours. NOt everyone's builds and not everyone is physically capable in the early stages and we have no idea if the OP was so it's pointless continuing to assert that "most" people are. OP may not have been.

    Depends on your universities system. Yes I have read the thread, and the fact that some will not give a note is part of the problem. Especially if your uni system is so black and white that if there is no note then that's it case closed you were lying no extenuating circumstances granted regardless of how much you try to show you weren't (yes some are like this).

    Yes that makes a difference but again university policy makes this difficult yet again, in order to get a retrospective note you need to make an appointment to get one from your GP. And then if that GP refuses to give a note you have to make yet another appointment with a different GP. Making these appointments and trying to get these notes takes time, and pretty much every uni system for mitigating circumstances has a time cap on when you can gather the evidence. At my uni that time cap is 5 days. Which presents a problem if you simply cannot get an appointment with your GP to ask for a note within that time frame....which as I said before is likely when a lot of GPs are so over prescribed some people are waiting more than a week for appointments for non emergent issues.
    I regularly have to wait for like three weeks to get an appointment to see a doctor (any doctor, not even a specific one or at a specific surgery!!!!). Makes getting sick notes for extensions and whatnot near-impossible considering the usual duration of illness...
 
 
 
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