Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    Wire we making puns instead of answering the question?
    ... Ohmygod... yeah... gonna see myself out
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    Wire we making puns instead of answering the question?
    Don't blow a fuse you seem to have people following you around with puns, really.

    OP, I guess Maths is an easier subject to help people with and there aren't that many physics helpers around.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Don't blow a fuse you seem to have people following you around with puns, really.

    OP, I guess Maths is an easier subject to help people with and there aren't that many physics helpers around.
    Sean, as you're a nice fellow, do you mind helping me with a few questions I agree with your point; it's just frustrating when you have so many unanswered questions!
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Sean, as you're a nice fellow, do you mind helping me with a few questions I agree with your point; it's just frustrating when you have so many unanswered questions!
    I can have a look but I can't promise much more - my days of AQA A-level Physics are behind me. (gosh, 2 years ago..!)
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    Most people are doing A level. The most popular a level is maths.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I can have a look but I can't promise much more - my days of AQA A-level Physics are behind me. (gosh, 2 years ago..!)
    Haha it's just this that has been bothering me for the last hour, seems relatively simple as well (pardon the pun ). http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144792-...nian-world.pdf Question 2)b) (ii)
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    Maths is cool.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Haha it's just this that has been bothering me for the last hour, seems relatively simple as well (pardon the pun ). http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144792-...nian-world.pdf Question 2)b) (ii)
    What's the problem? Consider (circumference of equator/width of photograph) = \frac{2\pi r}{3000} \approx  6.7 with r = 6400 \, \mathrm{km} - then 6.7 < 14 so obvious conclusion is obvious.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Whereas almost all maths questions get so many replies instantaneously :mad:
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    Oi! Your physics question got a reply within 4 minutes and you didn't even check it till four hours later. :cry2:
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Haha it's just this that has been bothering me for the last hour, seems relatively simple as well (pardon the pun ). http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144792-...nian-world.pdf Question 2)b) (ii)
    So the area that it needs to photograph is 2pir where r is the radius of the earth. So it needs to take 2pir/width photos.. I think. And that's when I get lost.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I'm actually tempted to blame that disparity entirely on Zacken :rofl:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Whereas almost all maths questions get so many replies instantaneously :mad:
    I have just joined this forum?

    The maths place seem they know their **** but I do agree. Same with chemistry tbh.

    There are facebook groups that I use where replies are pretty much instantaneous and the people there are good. Mostly as and a2 though.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L'Evil Wolf)
    I have just joined this forum?

    The maths place seem they know their **** but I do agree. Same with chemistry tbh.

    There are facebook groups that I use where replies are pretty much instantaneous and the people there are good. Mostly as and a2 though.
    Yeh it's the same with physics/chem and bio, all 3 tend to go unnoticed on here perhaps we can use this thread to post any questions and hopefully this will attract more help?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Yeh it's the same with physics/chem and bio, all 3 tend to go unnoticed on here perhaps we can use this thread to post any questions and hopefully this will attract more help?
    In all honesty, I think the reason is that people here simply lack the mental processing power needed to answer such questions.
    They can only answer relationship type questions.

    It's like trying to run the best game on a 10 year old computer.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SeanFM)
    So the area that it needs to photograph is 2pir where r is the radius of the earth. So it needs to take 2pir/width photos.. I think. And that's when I get lost.
    it's orbiting in a plane that goes through the poles with the earth turning underneath it once every 24h- so it's going to take a plenty of photos of penguins and polar bears and if there were to be any gaps it'd be at the equator.

    if a point on the equator moves more than 3000 km in 24/14 hrs then the satellite fails to photograph the whole surface.

    a point on the equator moves 2πr in 24h... has it moved by more than the 3000 km photo width in 24/14 hrs?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Because physics is haaaaaaaaard.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MathsAstronomy12)
    Haha it's just this that has been bothering me for the last hour, seems relatively simple as well (pardon the pun ). http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/144792-...nian-world.pdf Question 2)b) (ii)
    I only got 2 marks for this question :moon:

    I put the answer below.

    (Original post by Zacken)
    What's the problem? Consider (circumference of equator/width of photograph) = \frac{2\pi r}{3000} \approx  6.7 with r = 6400 \, \mathrm{km} - then 6.7 < 14 so obvious conclusion is obvious.
    Actually that yields 13.4
    But it ends up being more or less right.

    mathsastronomy when you read meticulously ocr say that "The orbit of the satellite passes over the Earth poles". Visualise the earth's spherical shape and you realise it passes earths equatorial orbit twice. By this it isn't going over a point on the equator like a geostationary satellite would rather over and under if you what I am trying to say

    Suppose that is why they boldened the first sentence to emphasise it.

    Therefore 13.4/2 = 6.7 orbits

    Since the orbital period of the satellite is less than 14.2 you can say that the pictures can be taken.

    Also zain?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Imperion)
    ... Ohmygod... yeah... gonna see myself out
    Am I shocking you with the epic-ness of my puns?
    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Don't blow a fuse you seem to have people following you around with puns, really.OP, I guess Maths is an easier subject to help people with and there aren't that many physics helpers around.
    I hope you're not Fleming mad because of this extra pun.
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L'Evil Wolf)
    Actually that yields 13.4
    But it ends up being more or less right.
    Therefore 13.4/2 = 6.7 orbits

    Since the orbital period of the satellite is less than 14.2 you can say that the pictures can be taken.
    Lol yeah - I jumped the step where I did 13.4/2 = 6.7 in there. :facepalm:

    Also zain?
    Yeah?
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources
AtCTs

Ask the Community Team

Got a question about the site content or our moderation? Ask here.

Welcome Lounge

Welcome Lounge

We're a friendly bunch. Post here if you're new to TSR.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.