Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by squeakysquirrel)
    Yeah but you don't need a degree and 27k of debt to do these hobbies
    There are not hobbies though. They are careers.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There are not hobbies though. They are careers.
    But the point is you do not need a degree to do these "careers".

    It is like you can now get a degree in being a nanny - from Norlands. It is not necessary. To be a good nanny you don't need academic qualifications - you need compassion and the ability to calm a screaming toddler.

    It is this obsession with getting a degree that has impoverished thousands of students - who end up working in McDonalds after. ( And I am not dissing McDonalds)
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Because there are different temperatures in different environments and some environments are very hot or cold so you often get ridiculous degrees like -1 billion which only exist in very very very extreme environments lol xo
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    http://thetab.com/uk/exeter/2012/03/...ty-courses-453

    This is a list^ of all stupid degrees UK students can take. My favourite is the Msc in Meat Inspection at Leeds City.

    This article is four years old now though so some may not exist anymore, but the point is that they existed in the first place. Someone literally said "why don't we offer a masters in meat inspection?"
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There are not hobbies though. They are careers.
    But they're obviously not careers which need degrees - theatre holds auditions, not exams. Do you think the Billy Elliots, Charlie Buckets, and Matlda Wormwoods have degrees?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    If everyone liked the same thing, the world will be boring,lol
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by squeakysquirrel)
    But the point is you do not need a degree to do these "careers".

    It is like you can now get a degree in being a nanny - from Norlands. It is not necessary. To be a good nanny you don't need academic qualifications - you need compassion and the ability to calm a screaming toddler.

    It is this obsession with getting a degree that has impoverished thousands of students - who end up working in McDonalds after. ( And I am not dissing McDonalds)

    As with most careers you need training. You don't need a degree to be a banker or a lawyer or an engineer. The non-graduate route in medicine only closed circa 1999. However a degree gives opportunities particularly in industries where opportunities for in-service training have reduced.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by squeakysquirrel)
    Yeah but you don't need a degree and 27k of debt to do these hobbies
    Obviously you don't play yugioh, or magic the gathering card games :P
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MildredMalone)
    But they're obviously not careers which need degrees - theatre holds auditions, not exams. Do you think the Billy Elliots, Charlie Buckets, and Matlda Wormwoods have degrees?
    Billy Elliot is very interesting because of course we can follow the cast.

    There were Billys in the original London cast; Liam Mower, James Lomas and George Maguire.

    Mower is reading for a degree in Ballet and Contemporary Dance from the University of Kent at the Rambert School

    Lomas and Maguire didn't go to university.

    Degrees are not necessary for actors/dancers but none-the-less they teach technique and give opportunities.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MildredMalone)
    But they're obviously not careers which need degrees - theatre holds auditions, not exams. Do you think the Billy Elliots, Charlie Buckets, and Matlda Wormwoods have degrees?
    In order to get into most auditions you need to be put forward by an agent. It can be difficult to get an agent based on just rocking up to their office and doing a monologue for them - degrees often provide a platform where you can do showcases and gain contacts and that's where agents will notice you. The fact that you've invested in a degree or drama school training shows that you have a commitment level and practical knowledge that proves more than a monologue or song delivered in an audition can prove. Many actors who break into the business as children do go on to get a degree in order to further their career and practical training, and those of us who don't break into the business as children need the training and insight into the business that a degree can bring (of course there are other paths, but degrees remain the most accessible and can get you to places that might be difficult to access if you were self funding your path through the career - having student funding available means that those in any income bracket can get a foot in the door of careers where they would otherwise need to find money to fund a move/multiple trips to the places where contacts are gained and auditions are held).
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jambojim97)
    Because there are different temperatures in different environments and some environments are very hot or cold so you often get ridiculous degrees like -1 billion which only exist in very very very extreme environments lol xo
    You can't get -1 billion though...


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    In order to get into most auditions you need to be put forward by an agent. It can be difficult to get an agent based on just rocking up to their office and doing a monologue for them - degrees often provide a platform where you can do showcases and gain contacts and that's where agents will notice you. The fact that you've invested in a degree or drama school training shows that you have a commitment level and practical knowledge that proves more than a monologue or song delivered in an audition can prove. Many actors who break into the business as children do go on to get a degree in order to further their career and practical training, and those of us who don't break into the business as children need the training and insight into the business that a degree can bring (of course there are other paths, but degrees remain the most accessible and can get you to places that might be difficult to access if you were self funding your path through the career - having student funding available means that those in any income bracket can get a foot in the door of careers where they would otherwise need to find money to fund a move/multiple trips to the places where contacts are gained and auditions are held).

    I think its short sighted to do a degree in drama or dance where the chances of finding paid work in said field is quite low. For example, 80% of actors are not working at any time and the working life of dancers is quite brief, around 15 to 20 years.

    It would be better for most people to do a degree with better job prospects like history or nursing as a fall back to wanting a career in risky fields like performance art.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Oh, another degree snobbery thread? That's new.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Runescapian)
    http://thetab.com/uk/exeter/2012/03/...ty-courses-453

    This is a list^ of all stupid degrees UK students can take. My favourite is the Msc in Meat Inspection at Leeds City.

    This article is four years old now though so some may not exist anymore, but the point is that they existed in the first place. Someone literally said "why don't we offer a masters in meat inspection?"
    Just because you do not think a a certain degree is useful does mean it is not. If you were not ignorant I doubt you would say it was "stupid".

    http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/...meatinspection

    The Tab's article is the same quality as the rest drivel on the toilet paper it calls news, complete crap.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maker)
    I think its short sighted to do a degree in drama or dance where the chances of finding paid work in said field is quite low. For example, 80% of actors are not working at any time and the working life of dancers is quite brief, around 15 to 20 years.

    It would be better for most people to do a degree with better job prospects like history or nursing as a fall back to wanting a career in risky fields like performance art.
    The thing is, most people just have a weird idea of what success means when they're pursuing a career in the performing arts. People think you've failed if you don't make it to Hollywood, the West End or Broadway but there are lots of jobs out there which require experience or training in the performing arts. A lot of actors who are out of work are hanging around in places like London or New York waiting for their big break, and they might be waiting tables while they struggle to find work. But the thing is if you adjust your idea of success and you genuinely love the world of theatre/performance and will therefore find fulfilment in any area of employment that is linked to that field then there is work out there. We need teachers of drama and dance for future generations and employment can be found in schools, further education colleges, specialist training colleges, community dance/drama schools, or as a private tutor. Or you can use your practical training to take you into areas such as drama or dance as therapy, taking your work into schools that cater for children with physical and mental disabilities. Or you can find employment as a performer in the smaller local theatres (that still pay you for your work) or branch off into work that is related to theatre while not taking on an actual performing role (this is also an option for performers who have retired).

    And no one should be going into nursing as a fall back plan. That's a difficult job and it requires you to have at least a small sense of vocation to be able to cope with the working conditions and treat patients with the care they deserve to be treated with. History is one of the most popular degrees and although it might open up certain careers it's definitely not a safe option because so many people are graduating with the same skills. If you want to perform in some capacity you might as well get yourself a performing degree than graduate in an academic subject only to realise that you're not satisfied unless you're involved in the performing world somehow.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    The thing is, most people just have a weird idea of what success means when they're pursuing a career in the performing arts. People think you've failed if you don't make it to Hollywood, the West End or Broadway but there are lots of jobs out there which require experience or training in the performing arts. A lot of actors who are out of work are hanging around in places like London or New York waiting for their big break, and they might be waiting tables while they struggle to find work. But the thing is if you adjust your idea of success and you genuinely love the world of theatre/performance and will therefore find fulfilment in any area of employment that is linked to that field then there is work out there. We need teachers of drama and dance for future generations and employment can be found in schools, further education colleges, specialist training colleges, community dance/drama schools, or as a private tutor. Or you can use your practical training to take you into areas such as drama or dance as therapy, taking your work into schools that cater for children with physical and mental disabilities. Or you can find employment as a performer in the smaller local theatres (that still pay you for your work) or branch off into work that is related to theatre while not taking on an actual performing role (this is also an option for performers who have retired).

    And no one should be going into nursing as a fall back plan. That's a difficult job and it requires you to have at least a small sense of vocation to be able to cope with the working conditions and treat patients with the care they deserve to be treated with. History is one of the most popular degrees and although it might open up certain careers it's definitely not a safe option because so many people are graduating with the same skills. If you want to perform in some capacity you might as well get yourself a performing degree than graduate in an academic subject only to realise that you're not satisfied unless you're involved in the performing world somehow.
    What you have written is not accurate. I have not written anything about going to Hollywood or the West End and its not helpful to try to put words into other peoples' mouths to try to bolster your argument. I don't think its a good idea to spend £27,000 plus on a degree that will get you a job waiting tables with the slim chance one may get a job in a regional theatre never mind the West End.

    Drama and dance teaching is important but there is hardly a shortage of drama or dance teachers so adding to an over supply will not help people get a reasonably paid job.


    Lots of nurses work part time for all sorts of reasons. It gives you a lot of flexibility to go to auditions and take short term acting jobs. Its a much better job income wise to be a nurse while waiting for your big break than a waiter.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by mscaffrey)
    The thing is, most people just have a weird idea of what success means when they're pursuing a career in the performing arts. People think you've failed if you don't make it to Hollywood, the West End or Broadway but there are lots of jobs out there which require experience or training in the performing arts. A lot of actors who are out of work are hanging around in places like London or New York waiting for their big break, and they might be waiting tables while they struggle to find work. But the thing is if you adjust your idea of success and you genuinely love the world of theatre/performance and will therefore find fulfilment in any area of employment that is linked to that field then there is work out there. We need teachers of drama and dance for future generations and employment can be found in schools, further education colleges, specialist training colleges, community dance/drama schools, or as a private tutor. Or you can use your practical training to take you into areas such as drama or dance as therapy, taking your work into schools that cater for children with physical and mental disabilities. Or you can find employment as a performer in the smaller local theatres (that still pay you for your work) or branch off into work that is related to theatre while not taking on an actual performing role (this is also an option for performers who have retired).

    And no one should be going into nursing as a fall back plan. That's a difficult job and it requires you to have at least a small sense of vocation to be able to cope with the working conditions and treat patients with the care they deserve to be treated with. History is one of the most popular degrees and although it might open up certain careers it's definitely not a safe option because so many people are graduating with the same skills. If you want to perform in some capacity you might as well get yourself a performing degree than graduate in an academic subject only to realise that you're not satisfied unless you're involved in the performing world somehow.
    PRSOM!
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Why are people on TSR always so down on things that are a bit different. There's joy and excitement in variety.

    Personally I'd love to give this a go: http://www.isunet.edu/about/master-of-space-studies

    (SPACE UNIVERSITY!!!! )
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Maker)
    What you have written is not accurate. I have not written anything about going to Hollywood or the West End and its not helpful to try to put words into other peoples' mouths to try to bolster your argument. I don't think its a good idea to spend £27,000 plus on a degree that will get you a job waiting tables with the slim chance one may get a job in a regional theatre never mind the West End.

    Drama and dance teaching is important but there is hardly a shortage of drama or dance teachers so adding to an over supply will not help people get a reasonably paid job.


    Lots of nurses work part time for all sorts of reasons. It gives you a lot of flexibility to go to auditions and take short term acting jobs. Its a much better job income wise to be a nurse while waiting for your big break than a waiter.
    I didn't put words into your mouth - I used the term 'people' referring to the general argument that is used to say that people won't succeed in the performing arts (as someone who has finally decided to follow what I want to do - the performing arts - instead of the 'sensible' option I've heard that argument a lot and it seemed like a good time to reference it in response to a post saying that 80% of actors are out of work at any one time). The fact is people are finding and maintaining careers in the performing arts and while the career might not offer as much stability as some other careers it's necessary that we have artists, and for most people who choose a performing arts degree they have a calling to that kind of life and career and so it would do them no good to send them in another direction because if you're not happy in your course or career chances are you won't find much stability anyway. And not finding stability in a career you don't care about is far worse than not being able to find stability while on a path that you chose because you love and believe in the work.
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I wish there were more imaginative degree combinations like Physiotherapy with dance and Chemistry with art history. We could apply for a major subject like English and a choice of minor like astronomy or anthropology.

    It would help to broaden our education and make people appreciate and understand more of the world.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
    Uni match

    Applying to uni?

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Articles:

    Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

    Quick link:

    Educational debate unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.