Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    How important is viewing a property to you? What do you usually look out for?
    • TSR Community Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    How important is viewing a property to you? What do you usually look out for?
    Very important - I always look out for signs of mould/damp as it's a nightmare :afraid:
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    Of course, where do you usually look? Bathroom tiles for example? Would it affect your decision to reserve a room?
    • TSR Community Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    Of course, where do you usually look? Bathroom tiles for example? Would it affect your decision to reserve a room?
    Bathroom yes, but also in living rooms and bedrooms - check behind sofas/curtains if possible. I also ask the person showing me around if it's a problem.

    It would affect my decision if the problem is really bad. Many houses in the UK have issues with damp so it's okay if it's managed
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    Interesting you mention about checking behind sofas, curtains definitely as there could be condensation on the window? What would you consider as really bad? Would you be put off by slight black marks?
    • TSR Community Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Community Team
    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    Interesting you mention about checking behind sofas, curtains definitely as there could be condensation on the window? What would you consider as really bad? Would you be put off by slight black marks?
    Yes, some landlords either try to cover it up or don't check for mould in those places.

    I'd be put off by any mould on the walls because that suggests a bigger problem. :beard: Around the windows would depend on how bad it was really
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Same as above I check for damp, mold and any other sign of the house basically falling apart.

    I took a massive risk during my first year and signed for a place none of us had viewed for second year as we left it quite late and were in a rush. The house turned out to be both good and bad. It was actually a very nice building, structurally sound and very good noise insulation. All of the problems we had with that house were not one we could have spotted in a viewing (general landlord was a thieving knob and plumbing issues all completely the landlords fault).

    But yeah, I strongly strongly urge no one signs a contract without viewing the property. I have seen and visited some dingy and disgusting student properties that in my personal opinion should be illegal and too much of a health hazard to let.
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    (Original post by Puddles the Monkey)
    Yes, some landlords either try to cover it up or don't check for mould in those places.

    I'd be put off by any mould on the walls because that suggests a bigger problem. :beard: Around the windows would depend on how bad it was really
    Sadly, some landlords do not make students aware of any fault in the property unless if the student notices it. Has this ever occurred to you?

    Apart from moulds, what else puts you off? On the other hand, what features do you find appealing?
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Same as above I check for damp, mold and any other sign of the house basically falling apart.

    I took a massive risk during my first year and signed for a place none of us had viewed for second year as we left it quite late and were in a rush. The house turned out to be both good and bad. It was actually a very nice building, structurally sound and very good noise insulation. All of the problems we had with that house were not one we could have spotted in a viewing (general landlord was a thieving knob and plumbing issues all completely the landlords fault).

    But yeah, I strongly strongly urge no one signs a contract without viewing the property. I have seen and visited some dingy and disgusting student properties that in my personal opinion should be illegal and too much of a health hazard to let.
    That's an unpleasant experience but very good advise indeed, that's the problem when you are looking in a hurry - you may oversee things which you wouldn't normally when you had the time?
    So did your landlord help you resolve any of the issues you had? What you could do as well is that, you could view the property on a sunny day as well as a rainy day to see if there are any leaks etc?

    What would you consider health hazard(s)?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    That's an unpleasant experience but very good advise indeed, that's the problem when you are looking in a hurry - you may oversee things which you wouldn't normally when you had the time?
    So did your landlord help you resolve any of the issues you had? What you could do as well is that, you could view the property on a sunny day as well as a rainy day to see if there are any leaks etc?

    What would you consider health hazard(s)?

    Not really, our previous landlord was very awful. He kept hiring completely unqualified people who were blatantly his mates to come fix the plumbing and of course it just kept breaking.

    Yeah I suppose that's an idea but a bit difficult to schedule to be sure it rains that day lol. But you ca check for signs of water damage along the walls and ceilings.

    Biggest ones I'd say (apart from obvious house is about to fall down) and mold and damp. People underestimate the affect it can have on your health, especially if like me you have asthma or any other condition which can make you more vulnerable. It also makes the house horrible to live in, clothes never quite dry and every stinks of mold and damp, including you when you leave the house.
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Not really, our previous landlord was very awful. He kept hiring completely unqualified people who were blatantly his mates to come fix the plumbing and of course it just kept breaking.

    Yeah I suppose that's an idea but a bit difficult to schedule to be sure it rains that day lol. But you ca check for signs of water damage along the walls and ceilings.

    Biggest ones I'd say (apart from obvious house is about to fall down) and mold and damp. People underestimate the affect it can have on your health, especially if like me you have asthma or any other condition which can make you more vulnerable. It also makes the house horrible to live in, clothes never quite dry and every stinks of mold and damp, including you when you leave the house.
    That's too bad, were you able to get any support from your university? Would you consider staying at your university hall or private accommodation instead as they should offer you 24/7 support?

    Oh dear, that would definitely have an impact on your health? Not to forget to mention that using electrical appliances in a damp house is also very dangerous too!
    • Very Important Poster
    Online

    19
    Very Important Poster
    Absolutely. places look very different in real life. its important to get an idea of dimensions and the surrounding area plus other things photos dont show you, such as noise or neighbours. Its a lot of money to commit an if you get it wrong it cna be an expensive mistake.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    That's too bad, were you able to get any support from your university? Would you consider staying at your university hall or private accommodation instead as they should offer you 24/7 support?

    Oh dear, that would definitely have an impact on your health? Not to forget to mention that using electrical appliances in a damp house is also very dangerous too!
    Honestly it was all happening right in exam season, we couldn't cope with trying to sort stuff out with our current landlord on top of exams and looking for a new place to live.

    No I would no consider living in private accommodation or university hall of that kind. They are always too expensive and the buildings are practically made of cardboard there is so much noise. I will only rent houses.

    Yeah, thankfully I've not had a mold problem or anything like that in any rented houses. Though my mum's house back home has mold and damp problems, it's awful.
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Absolutely. places look very different in real life. its important to get an idea of dimensions and the surrounding area plus other things photos dont show you, such as noise or neighbours. Its a lot of money to commit an if you get it wrong it cna be an expensive mistake.
    That is why it is so important to arrange a viewing appointment beforehand to get a full understanding of the building - and of course paying attention to the surrounding is also very important when it comes to social life outside of studies
    • Specialist Advisor
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Specialist Advisor
    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Honestly it was all happening right in exam season, we couldn't cope with trying to sort stuff out with our current landlord on top of exams and looking for a new place to live.

    No I would no consider living in private accommodation or university hall of that kind. They are always too expensive and the buildings are practically made of cardboard there is so much noise. I will only rent houses.

    Yeah, thankfully I've not had a mold problem or anything like that in any rented houses. Though my mum's house back home has mold and damp problems, it's awful.
    Hmm, so did you hear from your friends who have stayed in private halls or university accommodation that noise was always an issue? I would have imagined that help is always on hand if you spoke to an accommodation officer if you needed them in an emergency?

    Guess you may need to buy a dehumidifier for your house to prevent molds from forming/building up?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Study Inn Group)
    Hmm, so did you hear from your friends who have stayed in private halls or university accommodation that noise was always an issue? I would have imagined that help is always on hand if you spoke to an accommodation officer if you needed them in an emergency?

    Guess you may need to buy a dehumidifier for your house to prevent molds from forming/building up?

    From my own experience in uni halls + private halls I've visited. Basically any large building blocks built for students I stay away from. They are poor quality and overpriced. Nah not really, and doesn't negate the downsides.

    The problem in my mums house is the brick work, the water seeps through.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Find out more

    Accommodation profiles:

    Prodigy Living

    Prodigy Living

    Accommodation in 15 cities across the UK, with 24 sites providing modern, stylish en suite and studio rooms close to the major universities.


    iQ Student Accommodation

    iQ Student Accommodation

    Great value student rooms in city centre locations all across the UK


    X1 Lettings

    X1 Lettings

    Luxury student accommodation in Liverpool & Manchester.


    Collegiate Accommodation

    Collegiate Accommodation

    "This is student living. Just better."


    Scape Student Living

    Study Inn

    Providing stunning high quality, boutique student accommodation throughout the UK


    The Student Housing Company

    The Student Housing Company

    Award-winning student accommodation across the UK.


    Universal Student Living

    Universal Student Living

    “All-inclusive student accommodation in prime locations across the UK.”

    Articles:

    Student accommodation articles What to take to uniDo I need a TV licence?

    Quick link:

    Unanswered student accommodation threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.