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    (Original post by HC_1234)
    In a way she's right. All the unions do is whinge. I know that they have good cause too, but at the end of the day no one has to be a teacher. I've always thought if you don't like it, then quit. This is precisely what I'm planning on doing. I think the only way things will change is if more teachers vote with their feet. Whether we like it or not it's a jobs market. For the market to function properly you have to walk out if what you're being asked to do is unreasonable.
    That's why I quit, certainly, but it really isn't easy for many. Given what an ageist society we live in, any teacher in their mid forties onwards is likely to struggle with finding another job.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    That's why I quit, certainly, but it really isn't easy for many. Given what an ageist society we live in, any teacher in their mid forties onwards is likely to struggle with finding another job.
    Very true, and that has been a big factor in my decision too. I'm 29 and I figure it's now or never. It could be 40 years before I retire and I just don't see how anyone could hack that amount of time in the classroom. To me the idea of someone graduating from Uni, becoming a teacher straight away and then spending their entire career in the classroom up until retirement is inconceivable. In many respects you're better off going in to it when you're a bit older. If you start when you're in your 40s you can burn out just in time for retirement.
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    (Original post by HC_1234)
    Very true, and that has been a big factor in my decision too. I'm 29 and I figure it's now or never. It could be 40 years before I retire and I just don't see how anyone could hack that amount of time in the classroom. To me the idea of someone graduating from Uni, becoming a teacher straight away and then spending their entire career in the classroom up until retirement is inconceivable. In many respects you're better off going in to it when you're a bit older. If you start when you're in your 40s you can burn out just in time for retirement.
    Well, you are right to consider your future. I have just taken early retirement after more than 30 years, but I certainly wouldn't be doing that long if I started out now. My generation got a better deal than is on offer nowadays, so I can afford to go, but there is no way it will be doable for your generation.
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    A friend of mine whom I trying to help is unhappy in Accountancy. Although, he has a senior position, he feels unhappy. Any tips on what he needs to do to move in to teaching career. Not sure what to tell him if it would be best to work on being a college teacher (maybe in accounting?) or primary or secondary teaching. Thanks in advance.
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    Has he said he wants to go in to teaching? If so did he himself express a preference about what phase he would like to work in? My advice for anyone considering teaching would be to get some work experience in school, preferably at least a week's worth. Then you can see what it's really like in schools, chat to a few teachers and decide if it's right for you. In any case, you won't get on a teacher training course if you don't have at least some relevant experience on your CV.

    I would say also that if you're unhappy in your career you've got to make sure you don't go from the frying pan in to the fire. What doesn't he like about accounting? If he doesn't like the high workload and the stress then he should forget about a move to teaching. However if he yearns for more interaction with people, doesn't like the private sector and wants to "make a difference" then maybe teaching is worth considering.
 
 
 
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