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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Cryptids are animals whose existence has been suggested, but not proven by the scientific community.
    Thank you so much for all of the tags, this has been some great reading! Cryptozoology absolutely fascinates me, do you ever read the Fortean Times by any chance? That has a column every month on cryptozoology, it keeps me fascinated

    I have a bit of a thing about the Icknield Way, being as I live almost on it, have you ever read anything about it? It's a corridor running from Cornwall to the Wash, where all the local devil folklore is positive, not negative! There's some fascinating tales.

    Would you be interested in talking about folklore related to animals? There are some fascinating rhymes and stories about magpies in particular.

    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    A good example of a curse is that of the Chained Oak Tree of Alton Towers, which affected the Talbot family.
    This is a pretty cool curse, I do wonder if it's been overly marketised though, seeing as Alton Towers have a whole ride dedicated to it
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    (Original post by MissDobalina)
    Thank you so much for all of the tags, this has been some great reading! Cryptozoology absolutely fascinates me, do you ever read the Fortean Times by any chance? That has a column every month on cryptozoology, it keeps me fascinated

    I have a bit of a thing about the Icknield Way, being as I live almost on it, have you ever read anything about it? It's a corridor running from Cornwall to the Wash, where all the local devil folklore is positive, not negative! There's some fascinating tales.

    Would you be interested in talking about folklore related to animals? There are some fascinating rhymes and stories about magpies in particular.
    You're welcome! I remember you saying you liked folklore so I made sure to let you know whenever I posted about it

    No, I've never read the Fortean Times, it sounds really interesting though! And no, I've never heard of Icknield Way honestly, I'll have to check that out! Would you mind sharing some of the tales you know about it? And some of animal folklore too?
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    The Station Hotel, Dudley

    The Station Hotel in Dudley is reputed to be haunted by several ghosts, and is said to be one of the most haunted hotels in Britain.

    The most well-known phantom is that of a maid, thought to be named Elizabeth, who was murdered by the hotel manager in the basement of the hotel after rejecting his advances. Her ghost has often been witnessed walking up and down the basement steps, but she is most commonly seen in rooms 214, 215, 216 and 217. She is thought to be responsible for a range of phenomena experienced within these four bedrooms, including the movement of the beds and chairs, flickering of the lights and knocking/banging on the doors.

    The ghost of a man, believed to be that of George Lawley, a writer who knew of Elizabeth’s murder, is said to haunt the hotel restaurant. He is most commonly seen sitting at one particular table in the far corner of the restaurant, and is thought to be responsible for activity including the throwing of cutlery laid out on the tables, and the movement of glasses behind the bar.

    Two children are also believed to haunt the hotel, although who they are and why they haunt the hotel is still unknown.

    My Experience of the Station Hotel

    In November 2015, I went and visited the Station Hotel myself. I stayed with my mum in room 214, which is reputed to be the most haunted room in the hotel. When we went into the restaurant for dinner, we sat at the table where the ghost of George is said to have been seen. We didn’t experience anything spooky, although the music player in the restaurant did keep acting up for some reason, and the hotel staff had to come and fix it several times throughout the evening.

    We didn’t experience any other paranormal activity during the night. However, my mum said that at about 5am she heard a tinkling noise coming from the corridor outside the room. The only explanation we could find was the chandelier outside the room moving and making the noise. There were no drafts though (that we could identify), so we weren’t sure what was causing it to move (if that was indeed the source of the noise).

    Have any of you stayed at the Station Hotel or any other reputedly haunted hotels? I’d love to hear your experiences!
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    French Folklore

    Folktales from France contain a plethora of legendary creatures and spirits, from mythical mountain goats and river-dwelling dragons, to spooky underground tunnels where goblins were thought to originate.

    Dahu

    The dahu is a legendary mountain goat-like creature, which is believed to have legs of differing lengths, with the legs on one side of its body being longer than the legs on its other side. Dahus are believed to only be able to walk around mountains in one direction, and males and females may walk only in opposite directions.

    Dames Blanches

    Dames Blanches, or white ladies, are female spirits found in French folklore. They were believed to live in small ravines, fjords and on top of bridges, and their goal was to attract the attention of any humans which passed by, particularly men. She would ask them to dance with her, and if they did, she would let them continue on their journey. However, if they refused to dance with her, she would throw them into briars and other thorny plants.

    The Gargouille

    In French mythology, the gargouille was a legendary dragon which had four legs and wings. It was said to live in the Seine River in France, damaging boats and causing the river to flood. According to legend, the archbishop of Rouen, Saint Romain, lured the gargouille ashore and tamed it by making the sign of the cross. He then led it into the town to be slaughtered; however, when the townspeople tried to burn it, neither its head nor its neck would burn. The people then took the gargouille’s head and neck, and mounted it onto the wall of the cathedral as a sign of God’s power. Later, stone carvings of the creature were mounted onto buildings, thus creating the modern gargoyle.

    Matagot

    A matagot is a spirit which appears in the form of an animal, most often that of a black cat. Matagots are generally evil spirits, but some will bring wealth. It is said that in order to tame a matagot, a human must first offer it a fresh chicken. The human must then carry the matagot home without once looking behind them. If the matagot is then given the first mouthful of food and drink at every meal the human has, it will repay the human with one gold coin every morning.

    Lutins

    A lutin is a type of hobgoblin found in French folklore. Lutins live in peoples’ houses and are generally neither good nor evil. Lutins have a hatred of salt, and will not walk across surfaces where salt has been spilled.

    The Gap of Goeblin

    The Gap of Goeblin refers to a hole and underground tunnel in France, believed by some to be the original home of goblins. Goblins came out of the Gap of Goeblin, and spread throughout Europe, sneaking aboard Viking ships in order to reach Britain.
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    Timeslip Ghosts

    Timeslip ghosts are a relatively rare type of haunting, but they have nevertheless been reported on several different occasions in various locations. A number of timeslip hauntings are recognised, including immersion timeslips, phantom battles and ghostly bells.

    Immersion timeslips are the rarest type of timeslip haunting. During an immersion timeslip, the witness will find themselves seemingly in another period of time, usually one in the past, although future timeslips are not unheard of.

    Phantom battles are the ghostly re-enactments of battles which took place in the past. They are usually anniversary hauntings, which appear on the date of the original battle. They can range from spectral sounds to full apparitions, and can appear either on the ground, or in the sky above the site where the battle had taken place. A famous example of a phantom battle is the one found at Gettysburg in Pennsylvania, USA, which appears on the anniversary of the battle, which originally took place in July of 1863.

    Phantom bells are another type of timeslip phenomena, and take the form of the sound of bells ringing from churches which are no longer around. Typically, the church will have been submerged beneath the sea or a lake. Phantom bells have been experienced in various places, including Dunwich in Suffolk, and Lyonesse in Cornwall. Phantom bells are most often heard around Christmas time, one of the most important festivals of the Christian faith.
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    The Jamaica Inn, Cornwall

    The Jamaica Inn is widely believed to be one of the most haunted locations in Britain. Situated high on Bodmin Moor, it provided shelter for travellers and became a notorious location for smugglers. With its long and violent history, it’s no surprise that many paranormal happenings have been witnessed in and around the inn.

    The inn is said to be haunted by several ghosts, with one of the most well-known phantoms being that of a man who sits on the wall outside the inn. It is believed that he was murdered close to the inn after being lured outside one evening by his murderer. His body was found the next morning on Bodmin Moor, but who the murderer was, or how the murder was done, are still unknown. His ghost appears sitting on the wall outside the inn, looking out onto the moor; and does not move, speak or even acknowledge the staff or visitors.

    Another regular paranormal occurrence at the Jamaica Inn is the sound of horses and carts moving across the cobbles of the courtyard. These are most often heard during the early hours of the morning, but when guests open their curtains to investigate the sounds, there is nothing to be seen.

    One of the most active ghosts of the Jamaica Inn is a man wearing a tricorn hat and 18th century clothing, who haunts room 5. This ghost is thought to be responsible particularly for the strange behaviour of watches and clocks in the room, regularly changing the times or causing them to stop working altogether.

    A misty black shape is also occasionally seen, floating across the restaurant, along with the ghost of a man wearing a green jumper who has been witnessed standing in the doorway to the car park. Other paranormal activity at the Jamaica Inn includes footsteps wandering the corridors in the dead of night, and the sounds of people whispering in empty rooms.
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    The entire universe surrounding mythology/the supernatural is incredibly interesting, and this is a great thread OP, well done! Followed for further reading.
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    (Original post by Arkasia)
    The entire universe surrounding mythology/the supernatural is incredibly interesting, and this is a great thread OP, well done! Followed for further reading.
    Thank you! I'm glad you're enjoying it
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    Fyvie Castle, Aberdeenshire

    Fyvie Castle, Aberdeenshire is one of many castles in Scotland reputed to be haunted. A variety of ghosts and other paranormal phenomena have been reported at the castle, including phantom ladies, cursed stones and the sounds of ghostly trumpets being played in the dead of night.

    The ghost of Lady Meldrum, known as the Grey Lady, has been witnessed many times in different parts of the castle. It is said that she requested to be buried in the walls of a secret room in the Meldrum tower, but instead she was buried in the castle cemetery. Because she did not get her wish, it is thought that she now haunts the castle, causing a variety of unexplainable occurrences to show her disapproval.

    Another lady, thought to be Dame Lilias Drummond, also haunts the castle. She is now referred to as the Green Lady, and has been seen roaming the corridors of the castle, angry at her husband, Sir Alexander Seton, for leaving her for another woman after she had been unable to bear a son. She is said to leave the scent of rose petals wherever she goes.

    A phantom trumpeter, believed to be the ghost of Andrew Lammie, has been witnessed on many occasions. It is said that he died of a broken heart after the laird of the castle refused to let him marry his daughter, Agnes. Before his death, Andrew declared that the sounds of trumpets would be heard before the death of every laird of Fyvie thereafter.

    Perhaps the most interesting story surrounding the castle is that of the Weeping Stones of Fyvie. A man named Thomas the Rhymer once visited Fyvie Castle, and told the owners about three stones that had been taken from a sacred burial site nearby to build the castle. Unless the stones were returned to their original home, no male heir would ever inherit the castle. He also said that the stones would ‘weep’, becoming wet when all other stones of the castle were dry, and remaining dry when all of the other stones were wet. So far, only one of the stones has been found. It is currently kept on display in a wooden bowl, and is said to leak water (‘weep’) at random, sometimes producing enough water to fill the bowl. Thomas’ prophecy also appears to have come true, as no male heir has inherited the castle since 1433…
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    Swiss Folklore

    The folklore of Switzerland is seemingly less elaborate than that of other countries, but has some very interesting creatures and spirits nevertheless.

    Barbegazi

    Barbegazi are mythical creatures found in Swiss folklore. Barbegazi are small, human-like creatures with white fur and huge feet. They travel through the mountains (where they live) by using their feet as skis or snowshoes. Barbegazi stay in caves throughout the summer, and do not come out until the first snowfall in winter. Because they live at such high altitudes, they are rarely seen by humans. However, if they do encounter humans, they will sometimes whistle to warn them of danger if an avalanche is imminent.

    Jack o’ the bowl

    The Jack o’ the bowl is a spirit which lives in the houses of people in Switzerland. He is said to help out with household chores, tidying up etc, but only if a bowl of cream is left out for him to eat every night as a way of saying thank you.

    Kobolds

    Kobolds are sprites which appear in Swiss and German folklore. Kobolds can take many forms, but most commonly appear as small human-like figures, and have different appearances and clothing depending on the location they haunt (in homes – wearing peasant’s clothing, down mines – hunched over and ugly, and on ships – wearing sailor’s clothing).

    House kobolds live in the hearth of the house, and perform household tasks such as sweeping the floors or washing the dishes during the night, when the humans living in the house have gone to sleep. In return, the humans are required to provide the kobolds with daily meals of beer or milk and biscuits, and respect them at all times. If the kobolds feel neglected, then they will play tricks and generally make nuisances of themselves.

    Mine kobolds are generally believed to be malevolent, and were thought to be responsible for the accidents, cave-ins and rock slides which regularly injured and killed human miners. Miners sometimes tried to appease the kobolds with offerings of gold and silver, however, the kobolds did not cease in their malicious activity. Mine kobolds were also thought to be responsible for the placement of poisonous ores like cobalt, from which the kobolds get their name.

    Ship kobolds are generally thought to be benevolent creatures, helping out the captain and crew by performing tasks such as arranging cargo, and repairing any damage to the ship. As long as the kobolds are treated respectfully, they will continue to provide help. However, despite their generally benevolent nature, if a ship kobold is sighted, it is thought that either a member of the crew will die, or the ship is doomed to sink.
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    Ecclesiastical Figures

    The ghosts of monks, nuns and other religious figures are some of the most commonly reported sightings in Britain. These holy hauntings are most often witnessed in locations previously or currently associated with religion, including monasteries, abbeys, cathedrals and vicarages; however they are not limited to these places, and have also been seen in castles and manor houses, among other locations.

    One example of an ecclesiastical haunting is that of Pickering Castle, Yorkshire, where the ghost of a monk dressed in a grey robe has been seen wandering through the castle ruins. He appears with blood on his face and looks as though he is carrying something, but there is never anything visible in his outstretched hands.

    The ghosts of several monks are also believed to haunt the crumbling ruins of Tintern Abbey, Monmouthshire. Several monks have often been witnessed walking around the outside of the abbey carrying flaming torches; however one of the monks has also been seen standing alone underneath one of the abbey’s archways. He is said to disappear if approached by visitors.
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    The Edinburgh Vaults

    The Edinburgh Vaults are a series of approximately 120 chambers and tunnels of varying sizes built in the nineteen arches beneath the South Bridge in Edinburgh, Scotland (one of the two bridges built during the late 1800s to connect Edinburgh Castle to the land on the north and south sides of the city). For around 30 years, the vaults were used primarily by tradesmen, but also housed taverns, storage areas (especially for illegal goods), and living quarters for the people working in the vaults.

    However, as living and working conditions in the vaults worsened due to flooding and poor air quality, the tradesmen and other workers left the vaults, allowing the poorest Edinburgh citizens to move in. The vaults then became somewhat of a red-light district, where prostitution, rape and murder were rife for many years. In around 1820, the vaults were suddenly abandoned and sealed up, and their existence was rediscovered only recently, in the 1980s.

    With such a long and grim history, it’s no surprise that a variety of paranormal occurrences have been reported in the vaults, which are now primarily used as a tourist attraction, although entry is strictly monitored.

    One of the most menacing presences found within the vaults is that of a ghost known as Mr Boots. He has been described as a tall man wearing dark clothing and high boots, hence the name. It is said that he often lurks in the shadows, throwing stones at unsuspecting visitors and pushing/shoving people who enter the vaults. A man’s voice has been heard echoing through the chambers, and heavy footsteps have also been reported on many occasions.

    Another presence has been felt in the wine chamber in particular. The people working in the vaults on visitor tours and ghost tours have named the phantom Jack, and he has been known to grab the hands of visitors while they are in the wine chamber.

    Another frequently experienced phenomenon is that of a cold gust of wind suddenly blowing through the vaults. There are no doors or windows where a draft could come from; therefore the gusts have often been attributed to the paranormal. Visitors have also reported hearing voices whispering in their ears, and experiencing a general feeling of dread and foreboding when walking through the vaults.
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    Killakee House

    Killakee House, County Dublin, Ireland, is an 18th century farmhouse in Rathfarnham. It was built in 1806, but was abandoned and became derelict in the 1940s. In 1968, it was bought by an artist named Margaret O’Brien and her husband, who planned to turn it into an arts centre. However, the house has since been renovated and is currently used as a restaurant.

    The main phantom which haunts Killakee House is an unusual one: a large black cat with glowing red eyes, which allegedly has the ability to speak, known as the Black Cat of Killakee. Terrified workmen renovating the house often reported seeing the cat, but Mrs O’Brien dismissed their claims as nonsense. It wasn’t until she witnessed the phantom cat herself, that she decided to have the house exorcised.

    After the exorcism, activity calmed down for about a year, until a group of actors staying at the house (which was the arts centre at the time), decided to hold a séance as a joke after learning of its haunted reputation. Unfortunately, their séance seems to have incited further paranormal activity, including the appearance of two nun-like figures, the identities of which remain unknown.
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Black Dogs (Phantom Hounds)

    Black dogs are a type of elemental haunting which are found primarily in British folklore, and have been reported in almost all English counties, Scotland, Wales, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands.

    In British folklore, black dogs are believed to be omens of death, and that anyone who sees one will die. Black dogs are said to be larger than normal dogs, sometimes even as big as a cow, and often have large, glowing eyes which are typically red or green. Because black dogs have been reported in so many locations, they have been given a wide variety of names, including Black Shuck (Norfolk), Dandy Dogs (Cornwall), Gabriel Hounds (Sheffield), Barghest (Yorkshire) and Padfoot (Lancashire).

    In Wales, black dogs are known as Cwn, and a similar phantom, a large green dog known as Cù Sìth (also called a faery dog) is believed to haunt the Scottish Highlands. The Cù Sìth barks loudly three times, and anyone who hears it must seek safety before the third bark. If the third bark is heard, the person who hears it will die.

    Black dog hauntings are not limited to Britain, however, and such ghosts are known collectively in Europe as Hellhounds. In Europe it is believed that anyone who hears the howling or barking of a black dog is doomed to die.
    Have you heard of the Black Dog of Newgate? That's a pretty cool story...
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    (Original post by Francis Xavier)
    Have you heard of the Black Dog of Newgate? That's a pretty cool story...
    No, I haven't! What's the story?
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    No, I haven't! What's the story?
    Supposedly, a young clerk of Cambridge was imprisoned in Newgate awaiting trial for sorcery some time in the Middle Ages (I have heard of one version in which it's the Elizabethan period). The other prisoners were starving, and resolved to turn to cannibalism. Since the other prisoners were hardened criminals, the bookish lad from Cambridge didn't stand a chance, and was promptly slain by them. That night, his spirit (or familiar?) returned in the form of a hellish black hound. Some of the prisoners, fortified by their terror, managed to kill their guards and escape, but the dog still managed to track them down, killing every last one of them. The apparition was said to appear thereafter at every execution at Newgate, accompanying the condemned as he walked to the gallows.

    That's what I remember of the top of my head, anyway.

    Cool thread, by the way!
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    (Original post by Francis Xavier)
    Supposedly, a young clerk of Cambridge was imprisoned in Newgate awaiting trial for sorcery some time in the Middle Ages (I have heard of one version in which it's the Elizabethan period). The other prisoners were starving, and resolved to turn to cannibalism. Since the other prisoners were hardened criminals, the bookish lad from Cambridge didn't stand a chance, and was promptly slain by them. That night, his spirit (or familiar?) returned in the form of a hellish black hound. Some of the prisoners, fortified by their terror, managed to kill their guards and escape, but the dog still managed to track them down, killing every last one of them. The apparition was said to appear thereafter at every execution at Newgate, accompanying the condemned as he walked to the gallows.

    That's what I remember of the top of my head, anyway.

    Cool thread, by the way!
    Awesome story, thanks for sharing!
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    wow this is really interesting.
    There are spots in the house which feel really cold and they seem to move around a bit.
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    (Original post by rachelmary97)
    wow this is really interesting.
    There are spots in the house which feel really cold and they seem to move around a bit.
    Thank you Rachel! Perhaps your house is haunted?
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    (Original post by Leviathan1741)
    Thank you Rachel! Perhaps your house is haunted?
    Maybe but it's a new house which makes it unlikely, although it used to be to house the elephants for a circus.
 
 
 
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