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    Due to various personal and professional reasons, I decided to learn Norwegian. While researching the topic online, I've found that some people say it's one of the easiest languages for an English-speaker to learn, while others say it's not so easy.

    Assuming a relative commitment and immersion, how easy/difficult is it going to be and does anyone have any experience with it?

    Thank you
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    Hallo!

    You've made a great choice learning Norwegian, but it's going to be difficult none the less. It took me, as an Afrikaans speaker a good two to three years to learn it fluently. The test for Norwegian for foreign students is quite hard.

    Tip for you: If you speak another language, I'd recommend you try and tell the Norwegians you might be talking too, that you don't know English They often prefer to practice their English on you, than you let you practice Norsk on them...

    God Helg!
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    (Original post by darloviking)
    Hallo!

    You've made a great choice learning Norwegian, but it's going to be difficult none the less. It took me, as an Afrikaans speaker a good two to three years to learn it fluently. The test for Norwegian for foreign students is quite hard.

    Tip for you: If you speak another language, I'd recommend you try and tell the Norwegians you might be talking too, that you don't know English They often prefer to practice their English on you, than you let you practice Norsk on them...

    God Helg!
    I actually started using Duolingo on the day you recommended it and it's been going great so far. I plan on using it for as long as I can - that is, until I reach lower or middle intermediate level of proficiency (B1 or B2) and then I'll move on to TV shows, movies, books, articles and other such sources.
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    Hi! I'm Norwegian.
    As a language, the general consensus is that it's quite difficult to learn. There is such a wide variety of spoken dialects, and it differs quite a lot depending on where in the country you are - even in towns in the same county. Some Norwegians struggle to understand each other, as well.
    We also have two written languages, where nynorsk is seen as the least popular on a national basis (but if you ask me, it's also the prettiest one). I assume you'll be learning bokmål, as it seems that's what most people learn by default. The whole written language thing has been, and still is, an ongoing debate in our country...

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask or PM me!
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    (Original post by vonbroten)
    Hi! I'm Norwegian.
    As a language, the general consensus is that it's quite difficult to learn. There is such a wide variety of spoken dialects, and it differs quite a lot depending on where in the country you are - even in towns in the same county. Some Norwegians struggle to understand each other, as well.
    We also have two written languages, where nynorsk is seen as the least popular on a national basis (but if you ask me, it's also the prettiest one). I assume you'll be learning bokmål, as it seems that's what most people learn by default. The whole written language thing has been, and still is, an ongoing debate in our country...

    If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask or PM me!
    Thank you!

    Yes, I'm learning bokmål and from what I could gather already, it's not as hard as I thought it would be. Since I already know English with perfect fluency and speak some German, a lot of the words are either the same or similar to words in those two languages. For an example barn, or child, is very similar to the English world bairn - a synonym for the word child itself. This just one example, but so far it's been going good and Duolingo is very clear and concise with a good, steady learning curve.
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    (Original post by Withengar)
    Thank you!

    Yes, I'm learning bokmål and from what I could gather already, it's not as hard as I thought it would be. Since I already know English with perfect fluency and speak some German, a lot of the words are either the same or similar to words in those two languages. For an example barn, or child, is very similar to the English world bairn - a synonym for the word child itself. This just one example, but so far it's been going good and Duolingo is very clear and concise with a good, steady learning curve.
    That sounds great!
    If I were you, I'd try to learn some nynorsk after you get a decent hold on bokmål - especially if you ever plan on travelling here. Nynorsk is usually the chosen written language in Western Norway, and the spoken dialects there are quite close to the written language itself - and thus differ quite a lot from bokmål.
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    (Original post by vonbroten)
    That sounds great!
    If I were you, I'd try to learn some nynorsk after you get a decent hold on bokmål - especially if you ever plan on travelling here. Nynorsk is usually the chosen written language in Western Norway, and the spoken dialects there are quite close to the written language itself - and thus differ quite a lot from bokmål.
    Well to be honest, the plan is to likely live in Norway, not just travel or visit. So that's why I started to learn Norwegian (bokmål) well in advance before I have to start any planning for moving and such. That gives me a few years to really practice it and perfect it.
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    (Original post by Withengar)
    I actually started using Duolingo on the day you recommended it and it's been going great so far. I plan on using it for as long as I can - that is, until I reach lower or middle intermediate level of proficiency (B1 or B2) and then I'll move on to TV shows, movies, books, articles and other such sources.
    Yeah, I'm learning German with duolingo, what sort of resources you recommend for that?
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    (Original post by Withengar)
    Well to be honest, the plan is to likely live in Norway, not just travel or visit. So that's why I started to learn Norwegian (bokmål) well in advance before I have to start any planning for moving and such. That gives me a few years to really practice it and perfect it.
    Wow. Lots of creds to you for making such incredible effort!
    But yes, if you're moving here I'd definitely try to learn both written languages. I know for sure that there are a massive amount of Norwegians who suck at nynorsk, but depending on where you eventually settle and apply for a job, knowing both languages will come in handy.
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    I have no experience with Norwegian, but I've been self-teaching some Danish for a couple of years now, and i think the two languages are pretty similar? As an English speaker, i think that what you're saying about relative words etc.. is very true, there are definite similarities between the English and Scandinavian languages at times. For me the hardest bit has been nailing the accent; it's very specific and some of the sounds don't come very naturally to English native speakers, which can make it hard to master. I'm a long way off learning Danish, but I've been going at it very casually. I'd say if you work hard and keep going at it you could get quite good in a few years. Moving there, or staying there for an extended period of time would probably really help your language though!
    Good luck
 
 
 
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