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    (Original post by BhavyaB)
    Oh I meant the French A-Level sorry
    No not really. They only want 3 A levels and the ones they will care about are the 3 most important ones which are related to your degree and you will be taking in the second year.
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    (Original post by Relaen)
    4 is hard enough, haha I'd just stick with 4 if I were you, but it's your choice.
    Haha I'll keep that in mind, thankyou
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    (Original post by Brettmulrennan)
    Can i just point out to you that there's not really a huge advantage in even doing 4 a levels, so doing 5 is literally pointless, unless like someone said above, you're naturally clever and can handle the workload, even oxbridge could still reject you with 5, all it shows is that you can cope with extra work
    Hmm I get it.. Thankyou for your help
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    Most colleges wouldn't allow that unless you got exceptional GCSEs results and I'm talking all a* or A, and they would make you take 4 as a maximum(:
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    When you say 'fluent' do you mean you are a native speaker (or grew up being taught it)? If so, please do not take it at A Level.

    An A Level in a language is completely useless for a person who is a native of that language, it doesn't appear impressive to universities and it is seen as just an ''easy cruise'' for a person of that language to get a qualification.

    I don't normally deter people away from doing languages but I am fairly insistent that doing an A Level in a language that you know natively would not benefit you at all.
    Actually, it's not always the case that they are 'easy qualifications' I know this as I did GCSEs and A-levels in my native language when I was younger and those exams were nothing like the language exams I do in school. They were designed for native speakers as in I had to analyse poetry and literature and so on, kind of like our English exams. My foreign language exams in school are much easier -(I do French, German and Latin in school)
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    Good idea if your school will allow it. I know people who have started out with 6 AS levels, and then dropped down later. To start with 4 AS levels in Year 12 is very common, 5 isn't very many more.

    If you are truly good at French then it shouldn't be too much work, and if you aren't actually fluent/native it will be good to have the A level as proof of your ability. Further Maths and Maths are the same, it's just maths, but more of it, so they work well together. Physics will have some overlap with the Mechanics modules of maths too so it isn't really 5 separate subjects at all.

    I would suggest doing only 4 A2s or possibly 3 if you need to in order to really get the best grades but starting with 5 AS subjects can't really hurt, not sure what all the negativity is about here. Just don't be afraid to drop one if your grades aren't as good as they ought to be. I would suggest dropping Further Maths after AS because once you have done FP1 and all the Ms there's not much need to do any more, BUT check whether your desired universities want Further Maths A2 - most do not require it.
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    Actually, it's not always the case that they are 'easy qualifications' I know this as I did GCSEs and A-levels in my native language when I was younger and those exams were nothing like the language exams I do in school. They were designed for native speakers as in I had to analyse poetry and literature and so on, kind of like our English exams. My foreign language exams in school are much easier -(I do French, German and Latin in school)
    I am aware that the qualifications are not necessarily easy to succeed in (we have a native in our class who struggles with getting high marks on her essays), but to some universities being a native speaker and having an A Level in your language is not seen as something they like to accept.
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    I'm doing 4 at college now and it convincing to the lady in charge of the levels. Colleges always allow 3 to all students and if you really need the 4th one they might let you. I'm not sure about doing 5 a levels. Doing French might be helpful in terms of extra grade but I don't think it's something you really need to take at a levels. I mean you can always take French courses anytime and anywhere where it's online. Try if you can do it and if you can't I would say to leave French.


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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Because it doesn't put you at any advantage to others really apart from with Oxbridge and it will just stress you out more.
    It doesn't put you at advantage with Oxbridge either.

    (Original post by Science_help)
    if you are currently doing gcse, then you have no idea how much work is needed for a levels, it is soo much more.

    Gcse are childs play in comparison to a levels, and doing all that extra work is not worth it, and unless your a naturally very talented person and will also work very very hard, you will crush under the pressure, trustt me
    Lolling at this. Just because it is for you doesn't mean it is for everybody.
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    (Original post by BhavyaB)
    Hmm yeah I probably could do that but wouldnt that show as an incomplete degree on my CV or something?
    Nope, you wouldn't have took any examinations in it so you wouldn't need to put it on your CV. Besides, dropping a subject during college or sixth form won't make employers think of you any differently (unless you drop a subject you need for the job).
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    (Original post by amjones081997)
    Most colleges wouldn't allow that unless you got exceptional GCSEs results and I'm talking all a* or A, and they would make you take 4 as a maximum(:
    Oh alright thanks
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    (Original post by mathsmusicfrench)
    Good idea if your school will allow it. I know people who have started out with 6 AS levels, and then dropped down later. To start with 4 AS levels in Year 12 is very common, 5 isn't very many more.

    If you are truly good at French then it shouldn't be too much work, and if you aren't actually fluent/native it will be good to have the A level as proof of your ability. Further Maths and Maths are the same, it's just maths, but more of it, so they work well together. Physics will have some overlap with the Mechanics modules of maths too so it isn't really 5 separate subjects at all.

    I would suggest doing only 4 A2s or possibly 3 if you need to in order to really get the best grades but starting with 5 AS subjects can't really hurt, not sure what all the negativity is about here. Just don't be afraid to drop one if your grades aren't as good as they ought to be. I would suggest dropping Further Maths after AS because once you have done FP1 and all the Ms there's not much need to do any more, BUT check whether your desired universities want Further Maths A2 - most do not require it.
    This was very helpful. Thankyou very much
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    (Original post by Waliid)
    I'm doing 4 at college now and it convincing to the lady in charge of the levels. Colleges always allow 3 to all students and if you really need the 4th one they might let you. I'm not sure about doing 5 a levels. Doing French might be helpful in terms of extra grade but I don't think it's something you really need to take at a levels. I mean you can always take French courses anytime and anywhere where it's online. Try if you can do it and if you can't I would say to leave French.

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    I do take other French lessons, Thankyou
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    (Original post by jessyjellytot14)
    Nope, you wouldn't have took any examinations in it so you wouldn't need to put it on your CV. Besides, dropping a subject during college or sixth form won't make employers think of you any differently (unless you drop a subject you need for the job).
    Oh alright. Thanks so much
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    If you think you can cope with the extra work load do it because I know people in my year who are self teaching them selves subjects at home as well as the usually 3/4 school . If you do 5 at as level you will probably drop 2 at alevels as most only do 3 alevels n 4 as levels . I know GCSEs can seem stressful but compared to alevels they are really easy so I would consider the work load since you want to do engineering I wouldn't suggest it as physics n maths are very heavy work loads and there is a massive jump from GCSE to alevel in both . 😊
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    I am aware that the qualifications are not necessarily easy to succeed in (we have a native in our class who struggles with getting high marks on her essays), but to some universities being a native speaker and having an A Level in your language is not seen as something they like to accept.
    Oh OK, I see what you mean and I know that universities won't count my A-level in my native language but I didn't do it for that reason (I did the exams when I was in year 9 and it was out of school, I wasn't even thinking about universities then, I just wanted to do it for myself). And it's not that I was struggling, it's just that some exams like the ones I did, both GCSEs and A-levels are designed specifically for native speakers as I said before, sort of like the English exams we do in school here.

    Soi I believe that the person should do the exams for themselves, if not for the universities, but you are all entitled to your own opinions, I just thought I would express my own.
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    I know someone who did 6, and she went to night school to do two. If thats what you really want, go for it! Don't let anything hold you back X
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    (Original post by niv1234)
    Oh OK, I see what you mean and I know that universities won't count my A-level in my native language but I didn't do it for that reason (I did the exams when I was in year 9 and it was out of school, I wasn't even thinking about universities then, I just wanted to do it for myself). And it's not that I was struggling, it's just that some exams like the ones I did, both GCSEs and A-levels are designed specifically for native speakers as I said before, sort of like the English exams we do in school here.

    Soi I believe that the person should do the exams for themselves, if not for the universities, but you are all entitled to your own opinions, I just thought I would express my own.
    If a native wants to do the exam for their own interest, then that is fine IMO, they should just be aware it won't be regarded a lot by a university if they are particularly concerned about that And thank you for being so polite, you are entitled to your view as well.
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    (Original post by bethhieboo)
    I know someone who did 6, and she went to night school to do two. If thats what you really want, go for it! Don't let anything hold you back X
    Aha thankyou
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    (Original post by Charlyy27114)
    If you think you can cope with the extra work load do it because I know people in my year who are self teaching them selves subjects at home as well as the usually 3/4 school . If you do 5 at as level you will probably drop 2 at alevels as most only do 3 alevels n 4 as levels . I know GCSEs can seem stressful but compared to alevels they are really easy so I would consider the work load since you want to do engineering I wouldn't suggest it as physics n maths are very heavy work loads and there is a massive jump from GCSE to alevel in both . 😊
    Oh okay, thankyou for your help
 
 
 

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