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    A 'colleague' on my nursing degree (final year) has said the believes that epilepsy is "actually" caused by evil spirits called "Jinns" and that she administers medication because she has to for her NMC registration.
    I know that she doesn't have to believe in the drugs for them to work (please leave placebo and nocebo effect out of it), and that as long as she DOES administer them, that the patient is being cared for, but I can't help but think that this is a dangerous precedent, and that I should tell someone.
    The problem is, would this be considered "cultural" and as such be beyond criticism? personal beliefs are one thing, and don't necessarily spill across into practice, but this is potentially quite dangerous as she often shares what i would consider profoundly ill-informed and poorly thought out views...
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    Wow I've never heard of that. She really needs to keep her ideologies to herself. Keep it away from work. If becomes a problem if she starts sharing her beliefs with her patients. Also staff to be fair. But is it a reportable a offence? I don't think so but it depends how far she's taking it...who's she telling? Is it effecting her delivery of care? There's a whole host of things that need to be looked at


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    She's mentioned things like that before in university, 'possibly' on placements too from what I've heard, but I couldn't say with any of the certainty that such an allegation would deserve. I agree, I don't think there's anything that could really be reported, being ill informed isn't an offence after all, I'm just quite unnerved by the whole thing. Think I'll leave it and hope I never get treated by her.
    Thanks
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    I think it is religion. I do think that's possibly what she's been taught and if that's what certain people believe then I suppose it's not for us to say wether that's right or wrong. But we have to deliver care without prejudgment or push our values, beliefs or religion on anyone else. So she's best just keeping it to herself really


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    Are you close to this person? If you are, talk to them individually.
    If not, talk to a tutor to merely pass on concerns that you believe although she has her own religion and beliefs, she needs to keep them to herself.
    They could easily offend others (ie her patients and their families). And she needs to keep such things to herself when working.
    Everyone is entitled to believe in what they do, but making them evident in the workplace is not always appropriate.
    I know for my field (learning disabilities) saying such things to a patient could easily be misinterpreted or believed as truth.
    This could then lead to a multitude of problems in regards to people then not wanting to take their medication, exacerbating any mental health problems, worrying families and the patient themselves etc.
    If you're exposed to her beliefs then who else are they telling?
    If they understand NMC in regards to medication administration then surely they should understand about professional boundaries. Of which she is overstepping to an extent.
    I do think they may need a gentle reminder from their personal tutor etc before they qualify and are accountable to the NMC and not merely their university.

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    If a student (especially a third year) told me that was how a patient's medication was working they'd have to do an awful lot of work to convince me not to fail them.
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    im not sure what her views were on the medication was, actually, she just said that the 'real' cause and treatment were spirits/jinns and prayer respectively. I would assume that she must know that the meds do work, if only through her own experience.
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    Im not sure i'd agree with the "not for us to say wether that's right or wrong" thing, some people believe things that are demonstrably untrue, and whilst I can't prove that there are no Spirits/Jinns involved, that still leaves the (very heavy) burden of proof on her not only to prove that there are, but to 'explain away' all of the scientific and medical explanations and treatments. i would say that she is entitled to her beliefs though... this is the dilemma i was having, she is absolutely entitled to her beliefs, but when you work in a medical field, i kind of think that you should be expected to understand why we know that medicine works... we have had lectures on double blind RCTs etc. i guess that i am just so baffled by her statement that I'm not sure what to feel, its like if i found out that someone thought that my asthma was caused by ghosts or something.
    (Original post by wbnurse)
    I think it is religion. I do think that's possibly what she's been taught and if that's what certain people believe then I suppose it's not for us to say wether that's right or wrong. But we have to deliver care without prejudgment or push our values, beliefs or religion on anyone else. So she's best just keeping it to herself really


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    I think this needs discussing with a tutor or supervisor.
 
 
 
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