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My psychiatrists says anti depressants don't work watch

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    For mild to moderate depression they work no better than a placebo, and in severe depression they only have a minimal effect.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    For mild to moderate depression they work no better than a placebo, and in severe depression they only have a minimal effect.
    And what is your evidence for this sweeping statement?
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    And what is your evidence for this sweeping statement?
    Not sure if this entirely supports the quoted person or not (I have just scanned the abstract quickly), but this is certainly relevant:

    http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicin...l.pmed.0050045
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Not sure if this entirely supports the quoted person or not (I have just scanned the abstract quickly), but this is certainly relevant:

    http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicin...l.pmed.0050045
    One article is not 'evidence'.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    One article is not 'evidence'.
    Well it's a meta-analysis of 47 clinical trials, and has been cited over 1000 times.

    You may not consider it sufficient evidence (and indeed, I am not expressing my personal view here, I consider myself too uninformed), but it is certainly evidence.

    There are other papers if you search the literature:

    http://www.simplypsychiatry.co.uk/si...ssantswork.pdf

    Again, I'm not trying to give my personal view (I do not know enough to have one). But I feel providing references is at least useful and interesting for people reading the thread.
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    Antidepressants have yet to work for me (but my psychiatrist has came up with a new name for the dysthymia I'm diagnosed with) nor have antipsychotics.

    However, I have read many stories on here that they do work for many people. I just seem to have an abnormal reaction to modern mental health medicine (not to mention they don't really know what to do with me).

    OP, push for a new psychiatrist. The one you have sounds like a complete numpty.
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    (Original post by Chief Wiggum)
    Well it's a meta-analysis of 47 clinical trials, and has been cited over 1000 times.

    You may not consider it sufficient evidence (and indeed, I am not expressing my personal view here, I consider myself too uninformed), but it is certainly evidence.

    There are other papers if you search the literature:

    http://www.simplypsychiatry.co.uk/si...ssantswork.pdf

    Again, I'm not trying to give my personal view (I do not know enough to have one). But I feel providing references is at least useful and interesting for people reading the thread.
    http://alphachoices.com/repository/a...rsNewDrugs.pdf

    This is also relevant.
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    The above article was written in 2002 before many of the current SSRIs were available. Always read academic articles in context. And btw, 'cited a thousand times' means nothing -'cited' may actually be 1000 other people presenting a case against that author.

    For an introduction to this 'do they work' debate : http://slatestarcodex.com/2014/07/07...anted-to-know/.

    If you are interested in 'how to compare' academic evidence' I suggest you read the entire piece in detail. It will show you a) how bias operates within academic publications, b) the impact of funding of such journals and/or academics by the drugs companies themselves, c) personal bias, d) the danger of taking any one study in isolation.
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    (Original post by Noodlzzz)
    For mild to moderate depression they work no better than a placebo, and in severe depression they only have a minimal effect.
    This.

    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    And what is your evidence for this sweeping statement?
    See NICE guidelines.
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    I've been seeing a psychologist in London at The Blue Tree Clinic they do discounts for students struggling and they've been brilliant help for me with my depression, I've not taken antidepressants but I do receive CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) and that really helps me to manage my moods.
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    I think it's important to remember there are different types of anti depressants as well. If a ssri doesn't work, a SNRI or a beta blocker may. The placebo effect is well documented but there are often benefits which, when on the correct medication, can occur outside of that because the patient is unaware that effect would occur.

    Bpd with PTSD is an unusual diagnosis simply because the two overlap so closely in criteria that the differences usually mark out which one you have. You could try to see a clinical psychologist.

    Any professional who refuses to refer you to someone else because it would make them look bad is not a professional you should be working with. It's unethical. You could try to refer back to the CPN and assessment team.
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Yeah, I've had my doubts. I really can't decide but I found it interesting that a psychiatrist would say that as they kinda are all about prescribing meds so I thought I'd see what others think. I didn't think they were working when I was on them so I didn't mind being taken off however I have become a lot more unwell since being off them - he says it is a coincidence but I can't work it out personally. It's worth mentioning that my diagnosis isn't actually depression - it is borderline personality disorder & "symptoms of ptsd" whatever that means. My anxiety is very severe as well - my support worker says "If you don't have an anxiety disorder I don't know who does" :rofl: He has just started me on quetiapine this week.

    I am *supposed* to be changing psychs but god knows how long it will take - to be honest I have no faith in this one. He tells me he doesn't understand what services are out there to refer me into and tells me he isn't sure how to get me a care co-ordinator even though every professional working with me tells me I need one.... so it may just be that he is a bit dim (which wouldn't surprise me :rofl:
    Anti depressants don't tend to do much for BPD at all really, however quetiapine, like he has prescribed you, can be helpful. It may just be that he feels anti depressants for you is not right as he feels you have a diagnosis of BPD.


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    My psychiatrist has always said it will take time for the medication to have an effect, but also not to expect it to work without me "working with it". In other words, get my life together.
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    (Original post by Jenx301)
    Opinions?

    Seems a weird thing for a psychiatrist to say
    The brain is an extremely complex bio-electric system. You need to take a lot of care to keep your brain functioning efficiently. Any antidepressant is just a chemical molecule that acts on the brain in one major way, it is like a brute force treatment. It's best just to look after your brain as best you can:

    - Give up alcohol.

    - Always get enough sleep, 7 to 8 hours.

    - Eat very well. Particularly eat what is good for the brain, e.g. walnuts, blueberries, mackerel.

    - Don't overwork.

    - Don't over think, this depletes neurotransmitters.

    - Don't over worry, this depletes neurotransmitters.
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    (Original post by bullettheory)
    Anti depressants don't tend to do much for BPD at all really, however quetiapine, like he has prescribed you, can be helpful. It may just be that he feels anti depressants for you is not right as he feels you have a diagnosis of BPD.


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    This. Anti-depressants are not recommended for BPD, so maybe this is what you psychiatrist was referring to?
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    (Original post by bullettheory)
    Anti depressants don't tend to do much for BPD at all really, however quetiapine, like he has prescribed you, can be helpful. It may just be that he feels anti depressants for you is not right as he feels you have a diagnosis of BPD.


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    They're currently running a drugs trial for bpd. I was offered it before I was given correct diagnosis of PTSD

    Hopefully this will create a drug which eases the symptoms of bpd to help sufferers engage with therapy.
 
 
 
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