What are 2 differences between lipid layer in mammals, and lipid layer in oil?

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crcrcrcrcr
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#1
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#1
A part of the syllabus im struggling with, any ideas?
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BaffedChild
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(Original post by crcrcrcrcr)
A part of the syllabus im struggling with, any ideas?
Wass struggling too hopefully someone smart replies lol
my thoughts were:
the lipid layer in oil is liquid and in mammals it is solid
the lipid layer in oil is unsaturated but in mammals it is saturated
the lipid layer is in vitro in oil but in vivo in mammals
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Harantony
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I'm glad you came up with some yourself! I'll go through each one:
  • the lipid layer in oil is liquid and in mammals it is solid
Unsure to be honest, considering a cellular layer is on a microscopic level. If you put cells into a medium, it'd still look like a liquid, and so one may deduce that the cell lipid layer is also a liquid.
  • the lipid layer in oil is unsaturated but in mammals it is saturated
True, some lipids in oil are unsaturated.
  • the lipid layer is in vitro in oil but in vivo in mammals
Also true, but not sure if the question wants a structural answer. Also, oil and lipid droplets can also be in vivo through the food we eat.

Have a think about the environment of cells: there's an aqueous environment both inside and outside a cell, and so there needs to be a bilayer, with the hydrophilic heads facing towards the aqueous environments. Now think about oil in water - the oil droplet is a hydrophobic environment, and so you only need a single lipid monolayer so the hydrophilic heads will face towards the water, and the hydrophobic tails will face towards the oil.

Also, think about the function of a cell, and how a bilayer might affect this. Unlike an oil droplet, cells need to transport things like glucose, proteins, water, ions etc. across their surface. Cell bilayers, therefore, are studded with proteins, cholesterol, carbohydrates and so on, to allow them to carry out their functions as living things.

Hope this helps!
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