Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    So I'm searching for a new car to buy as my first car and I found a vauxhall corsa which is labeled as "Cat D" in 2011. The price of the car is okay within my budget but I'm just worried about buying it incase if "Cat D" is bad? Any tips?
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    As in a category D writeoff? If I remember correctly, Cat D is ineconomic to repair. So unless you have access to parts and the skills to fix it, I'd swerve it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HFBS)
    As in a category D writeoff? If I remember correctly, Cat D is ineconomic to repair. So unless you have access to parts and the skills to fix it, I'd swerve it.
    It says in the description "Very light wing and bumber, but professionally repaired and been used ever since". Doesn't mention anything about writeoff but would that be good? sorry btw I'm a total newb when it comes to things like this.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ramo55)
    It says in the description "Very light wing and bumber, but professionally repaired and been used ever since". Doesn't mention anything about writeoff but would that be good? sorry btw I'm a total newb when it comes to things like this.
    A write off is the opposite of good. The car has been in a smash.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    CAT D is the lowest damage for a car. Basically, the insurance company figure it's cheaper for them to give a cash settlement rather than pay out for repairs/a replacement (which would also include the cost of towing, courtesy car, inspection etc) but the car can be repaired fully and returned to the road. However, some insurance companies may charge a higher premium.

    Best thing to do is test drive the car (make sure all the gears work, it can get up to speed, the clutch isn't jerky or slipping, breaks work well etc) and really inspect it if you go see it. Like under the bonnet, oil, coolant, the paint, bumpers, wing mirrors, even under the car! Consider getting it checked by a mechanic (but you'll need to pay for this)
    Ask tons of questions about it: What damage did the car sustain? Where and what work was carried out? What parts were replaced? Check the service history.

    Hope this helps.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Insurers sometimes either totally refuse to insure a Cat D or hike up the prices. Be very careful before making a final decision.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Bargepole distance from it really.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ramo55)
    btw I'm a total newb when it comes to things like this.
    I think for this reason alone steer clear.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ramo55)
    So I'm searching for a new car to buy as my first car and I found a vauxhall corsa which is labeled as "Cat D" in 2011. The price of the car is okay within my budget but I'm just worried about buying it incase if "Cat D" is bad? Any tips?
    Your insurers will definitely insure the corsa ! But they may insure it slightly higher than for a normal corsa's. I mean cat D's are really cheap and corsa's are solid , however it will depreciate in price rapidly as time goes on because it's a write off, But as a first car regarding there's nothing wrong with it , you're all good , just get a insurance quote that'll suit you.

    ( I buy Cat D cars and fix them to try pay off my student loan lol )


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Cat D means it's only been written off because it's old and paying someone else to do the repairs is worth more than the car. For example a damaged body panel replace/respray is £300+ potentially, why spend that on a £500 car, you could buy a different car for not much more.

    There won't be much wrong with it more than likely, but you don't know.

    Is it from a dealer or private sale? Steer clear of Cat C/D private sales.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by ramo55)
    It says in the description "Very light wing and bumber, but professionally repaired and been used ever since". Doesn't mention anything about writeoff but would that be good? sorry btw I'm a total newb when it comes to things like this.
    http://www.autotrader.co.uk/safety_a...nce_categories

    (Original post by HFBS)
    I think for this reason alone steer clear.
    ^this
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    A car can be cat D if it's nicked with the keys and missing for more than 60 days so not neccesarily the end of the world.

    Like everything else, have a look and assess it on it's own merrits.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by JC.)
    A car can be cat D if it's nicked with the keys and missing for more than 60 days
    Interesting, why?

    (I'm guessing it's because the claim might already have been settled prior to the recovery?)
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Interesting, why?

    (I'm guessing it's because the claim might already have been settled prior to the recovery?)
    You got it.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by JC.)
    You got it.
    Yay me!

    Although I doubt I'd want my pride and joy back if some toerag has had it for 2 months....

    And a potential (and inexperienced) Cat D buyer should also have that concern.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    the simple guide
    cat a- literally a cube of metal or an incinerated shell
    cat b- un repairable structure damage to chassis
    cat c-damage normally written off as a matter of finance
    cat d- damage not major can still be driven (my dad's monado is a cat d it's of a 10p hold in the rear bumper case and missing paint on the front)
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    My Dad has been dealing cat D cars for nearly 10 years. He has always repaired them to a high standard as best as possible.

    92% of his cars have ran very well, low mileage and well cared by previous owners +full MOT history, service history, and has always let buyers view the car properly/inspect it. He has also been honest to buyers about previous damage.

    A few cars might have had problems or need more repair, but my Dad has been honest about it to buyers.

    If a car is catD, check the car, ask seller what damage was, where it was repaired. Make sure theres no repair mistakes, etc. Check history and how it runs.

    Some cat D cars might have had only minor damage like a bump, dent or scrape. If their well repaired, they can be worth it at a reasonable good price.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Yay me!

    Although I doubt I'd want my pride and joy back if some toerag has had it for 2 months....

    And a potential (and inexperienced) Cat D buyer should also have that concern.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I once went to visit my mate in brighton. He'd had his car nicked about 4 weeks ago. Totally by chance we found it parked up in a side street. Luckily he still had the car key on his bunch of keys... so we nicked it back!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    No, for the love of god and for the sake of how deep your pocket is. Do not buy a CAT D or C car. I've never done it, it's just not worth the risk!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Problem with Cat D's, (and even Cat D's that have been repaired) is that even though the damage that is apparent has been fully repaired, you can never know for sure the true extent of the collision. e.g. other parts may die on you, a hell of a lot quicker than they would on a non-cat D car.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.