Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Does university matter for engineering as long as it's accredited? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (top 20 vs top 100)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I did engineering at a top 100 university, rather than top 20 (towards the end of the 100 actually) and all I can say is that, the accreditation is given for the bare minimum. Top 20 degrees will teach you at least twice as much as the lower classed ones.

    If you are doing a bachelor degree at a top 100 university, my advice is to not do the MEng, stick with the BEng, and do an MSc at a top 20 university, but a specialised one.

    For example, if you finish with a BEng in Civil Engineering, don't do an MSc in Civil Engineering, do one in Structural Engineering, or Transport Engineering, or any specialisation that you liked during your bachelor and would like to work in. That way you will not only go through the basics of it again, but you will be taught everything else that you missed for being at a top 100 university + the required MSc curriculum.

    If you decide to just keep your top 100 university degree, you will find a job, but you will start struggling at work because of some lack of knowledge and you will start spending your free time on studying what you should have already known (depending on the expectations of your employer). This is also an option I guess if you don't mind.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Employers know about the quality of graduates from different universities. Some employers will only take grads from specific unis. Yes, it matters.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Can an experienced engineer or a recent graduate tell me about this? I feel people are brainwashed as to what university is better/worse based on university rankings.

    If say I go to Manchester Met for Mech Eng compared to Manchester Uni? Both degrees are accredited by the IMechE, won't they have the same job prospects for ENGINEERING?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I told you already.

    I am a recent grad. I studied Civil Engineering at a bottom university from all the unis in the UK. The course is accredited, but compared to Russell Group Uni students, who were in class maybe 25 to 30 hours per week, I was around 15-18 hours, some years as low as 10.

    So compared to them I learned a lot less, for the some number of credits per year. I had 3 x 20 credit modules per semester, they had maybe 6 x 10 credit modules per semester, but each of their 10 credit modules were as intense as my 20 credit modules, so they learned more.

    Did I get a job in the end? All of my colleagues who graduates got a job. Many for big consultancies or contractors, including myself, getting paid £22-28k per year.

    However, I don't know about my colleagues, but over the 2 summer internships that I had, I noticed that they were expecting a certain level of knowledge from me, which I did not have. And because of this I had to start doing a lot of extra reading to learn what people from Russell Group unis were taught in class.

    So as a conclusion from my personal experience, yes, you will get a job even with an accredited degree from a low classed university, however you might need to do some extra studying in your own time on the topic you want to or will work in to get to the same level as others of the same career level as you that finished the same course as you but from a high classed university.

    Makes sense?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Greu)
    I told you already.

    I am a recent grad. I studied Civil Engineering at a bottom university from all the unis in the UK. The course is accredited, but compared to Russell Group Uni students, who were in class maybe 25 to 30 hours per week, I was around 15-18 hours, some years as low as 10.

    So compared to them I learned a lot less, for the some number of credits per year. I had 3 x 20 credit modules per semester, they had maybe 6 x 10 credit modules per semester, but each of their 10 credit modules were as intense as my 20 credit modules, so they learned more.

    Did I get a job in the end? All of my colleagues who graduates got a job. Many for big consultancies or contractors, including myself, getting paid £22-28k per year.

    However, I don't know about my colleagues, but over the 2 summer internships that I had, I noticed that they were expecting a certain level of knowledge from me, which I did not have. And because of this I had to start doing a lot of extra reading to learn what people from Russell Group unis were taught in class.

    So as a conclusion from my personal experience, yes, you will get a job even with an accredited degree from a low classed university, however you might need to do some extra studying in your own time on the topic you want to or will work in to get to the same level as others of the same career level as you that finished the same course as you but from a high classed university.

    Makes sense?
    Good post!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    That is why I recommended doing a BEng, rather than an MEng, then do an MSc at a top university, if you want more specialised knowledge as well as a higher and most of the times even better level of education.

    Just my two cents.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Greu)
    That is why I recommended doing a BEng, rather than an MEng, then do an MSc at a top university, if you want more specialised knowledge as well as a higher and most of the times even better level of education.

    Just my two cents.
    What university did you attend for your BEng?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Youngman2012)
    What university did you attend for your BEng?
    Napier. Currently doing an MSc at Newcastle Uni, got 2 internships done with a large multinational consultancy and a job with them after I graduate.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Youngman2012)
    (top 20 vs top 100)
    I know someone a chemical engineer who graduated from teesside uni. Now works for 2nd biggest oil company in the world. It's about experience

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Youngman2012)
    (top 20 vs top 100)
    Yes obviously university matters
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Youngman2012)
    Nice. Did going to Newcastle help secure the job? And for an MSc are you awarded a 2.1 or can you just pass it with a 2.1 BEng for graduate schemes which ask for a 2.1 MEng/MSc?
    I secured my job before doing the MSc because of my performance in the 2 internships. The company has even paid half of my MSc tuition so that I can come back and work for them.

    I finished with a 1st class degree and got a university medal for best student in my course, and best dissertation prize.

    The MSc final mark doesn't matter as much as the BEng one. It all depends on your goals as well.

    If you want "a job", then a 2.1 in your BEng and a pass in your MSc is enough. Or just finish your BEng and go work.

    If you want "the job" with a company that you like or want to work for, then get a 1st in your BEng, get at least a Merit in your MSc (60%+), get involved with the accrediting institution (the graduate and student committee of the institution in your area e.g. IET, ICE, IMechE etc.), do extra curricular activities (uni societies), get a part time job to develop your soft skills (team work, leadership, communication etc.), apply for interships etc.

    It sounds cliche, but it's actually true. It works, and I am living proof that it works.

    As a conclusion, it depends on your goals and motivation. It requires more work and effort though outside of the lecture hall.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Greu)
    I secured my job before doing the MSc because of my performance in the 2 internships. The company has even paid half of my MSc tuition so that I can come back and work for them.

    I finished with a 1st class degree and got a university medal for best student in my course, and best dissertation prize.

    The MSc final mark doesn't matter as much as the BEng one. It all depends on your goals as well.

    If you want "a job", then a 2.1 in your BEng and a pass in your MSc is enough. Or just finish your BEng and go work.

    If you want "the job" with a company that you like or want to work for, then get a 1st in your BEng, get at least a Merit in your MSc (60%+), get involved with the accrediting institution (the graduate and student committee of the institution in your area e.g. IET, ICE, IMechE etc.), do extra curricular activities (uni societies), get a part time job to develop your soft skills (team work, leadership, communication etc.), apply for interships etc.

    It sounds cliche, but it's actually true. It works, and I am living proof that it works.

    As a conclusion, it depends on your goals and motivation. It requires more work and effort though outside of the lecture hall.

    This^

    More people need to realise that jobs don't just come falling down on their laps. It takes a lot of effort to build up the right CV, and to jump through all the interview hoops. Those that have caught (a.k.a the above user) and that are willing to graft it out, will come out unscathed.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Alexion)
    Employers know about the quality of graduates from different universities. Some employers will only take grads from specific unis. Yes, it matters.
    Very very very rarely.

    They want to employ good people, not "good" universities.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Very very very rarely. And even more rarely for engineering employers.

    They want to employ good people, not "good" universities.
    That could be said for any profession lol
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by GeologyMaths)
    That could be said for any profession lol
    Indeed. I'll amend.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Very very very rarely.

    They want to employ good people, not "good" universities.
    True, although recruiting people from "good" universities is seen as a reasonable shortcut to that goal, it can be used just the same as the 2:1 cutoff except even more effectively because certain universities may teach content which is useful to that company. Usually when companies work with universities they will also recruit more people from that university, so that's another way it can have an effect.
    • Section Leader
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    True, although recruiting people from "good" universities is seen as a reasonable shortcut to that goal, it can be used just the same as the 2:1 cutoff except even more effectively because certain universities may teach content which is useful to that company. Usually when companies work with universities they will also recruit more people from that university, so that's another way it can have an effect.
    Yes a "good" uni can facilitate the opportunity, but it's still up to the applicant to secure the role. And "poor" unis often actually have good industry links, and even if they don't a good student can still land good roles.

    And of course I'm not saying don't go to a good uni if you want to. I'm just saying that that of itself a good uni is not sufficient to getting a career in your chosen field. I went to a poly, my career has been good (not engineering but that's immaterial). My eldest son will be going to a "good" uni, it will be up to him to end up in a good career.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Youngman2012)
    Thanks for the help Greu. I will start to consider applying for an MSc.
    What sort of salary should I be expecting as a graduate engineer?
    Depends on the industry, company and degree level. Generally between 22.000 and 28.000 per year (before taxes of course). Chemical engineers can expect 30.000+.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Why are Chemical Engineers paid so well? Oil industry?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
    Useful resources

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    ICAEW logo

    Merck

    "Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.