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    Please can someone check/correct the second half of my German work . I've also written the english so you can try and work out what I'm trying to put. Thanks.Name:  image.jpg
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    Did you take a picture of your laptop screen =/

    If you paste the text here we could probably help you easier.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Did you take a picture of your laptop screen =/

    If you paste the text here we could probably help you easier.
    Yes I did, sorry I don't have access to my laptop at the moment. Is there any way you can correct it and just tell me where the corrections go?
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    (Original post by TheWantedForever)
    Yes I did, sorry I don't have access to my laptop at the moment. Is there any way you can correct it and just tell me where the corrections go?
    Das Schlimmste war das Besuchen von dem Geschichtemuseum. (the gerund [visiting] is difficult in German - I'm not certain if , zu besuchen works in the past like that, the way I have written should.)

    Ich fand das sehr.. not Ich finde (past tense)

    liebte alle von den Artefakten (all of artifacts doesn't make sense)

    also ging Leah und ich... (verb has to go straight after also)

    aber es war nicht alles schön - what do you mean here?

    Dann wir in das Cafe gingen hatte ich eine Cola > what are you trying to say here? "Then we went to the cafe and i had a cola"? If so, think about where the verb gingen would go and then add the und and think about where hatte would go. Cola is also neutral

    Auf der Reise zurück zu Leah's Hauses > I'm not certain if this how you say 'on the trip back to', but you don't use the apostrophe in German like this. Leahs Haus (why Hauses?) is correct.

    brach das Auto - if you want to speak about a car breaking down say, das Auto hat(te in past) eine Panne.

    so dass wir spät nach Hause kam - what do you mean here?

    warden = werden

    Sie werden für einen Monat in London bleiben.

    werd = wird

    die konnte = sie konnte

    "nach Brighton...etc." sounds wrong, what do you mean by nach?

    spaß sind = Spaß machen

    verbessern has an r

    neue Freunde (plural ending) machen

    Leahs Schule

    would remove es from ''denn sie liebt es''

    Lieblingsfach should go to the plural as you're mentioning two subjects.

    Capitalise all nouns and uncapitalise verbs.

    --
    I'm uncertain about a few things (whether they're correct/incorrect) so TheOtherSide pls send any help you can =] especially about whether the , zu besuchen works in past tense?

    wrong person, i mean TheOtherSide.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Das Schlimmste war das Besuchen von dem Geschichtemuseum. (the gerund [visiting] is difficult in German - I'm not certain if , zu besuchen works in the past like that, the way I have written should.) I'd say to stick with 'das Besuchen' as well. It does seem to sort of work, but you'd probably be safer using what Inexorably suggested.

    Ich fand das sehr.. not Ich finde (past tense)

    liebte alle von den Artefakten (all of artifacts doesn't make sense)

    also ging Leah und ich... (verb has to go straight after also)

    aber es war nicht alles schön - what do you mean here? You put in the English translation that 'there wasn't anything nice', so you could say 'aber es gab nichts Besonderes'

    Dann wir in das Cafe gingen hatte ich eine Cola > what are you trying to say here? "Then we went to the cafe and i had a cola"? If so, think about where the verb gingen would go and then add the und and think about where hatte would go. Cola is also neutral

    Auf der Reise zurück zu Leah's Hauses > I'm not certain if this how you say 'on the trip back to', but you don't use the apostrophe in German like this. Leahs Haus (why Hauses?) is correct. I think that you use nach instead of zu

    brach das Auto - if you want to speak about a car breaking down say, das Auto hat(te in past) eine Panne.

    so dass wir spät nach Hause kam - what do you mean here? Use 'also' here, so 'also kam wir spät nach Hause'.

    warden = werden

    Sie werden für einen Monat in London bleiben.

    'Leah ist freue mit darauf' doesn't make sense - do you mean 'Leah freut sich darauf'?

    werd = wird I think it's 'they will' here, so 'werden'

    die konnte = sie konnte

    "nach Brighton...etc." sounds wrong, what do you mean by nach? Pretty sure you don't use 'nach' with 'besuchen'

    spaß sind = Spaß machen There's also a comma before 'weil'

    verbessern has an r

    neue Freunde (plural ending) machen

    Leahs Schule

    After ‘Sie hat vier Lektionen, die’, send the verb to the end (I think that you meant to say ‘dauert’ instead of ‘zuletzt’).

    would remove es from ''denn sie liebt es''

    Lieblingsfach should go to the plural as you're mentioning two subjects.

    Capitalise all nouns and uncapitalise verbs.

    --
    I'm uncertain about a few things (whether they're correct/incorrect) so TheOtherSide pls send any help you can =] especially about whether the , zu besuchen works in past tense?

    wrong person, i mean TheOtherSide.
    Comments are in bold - I hope these help...

    Spoiler:
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    I feel pretty honoured by you tagging me
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    Comments are in bold - I hope these help...
    Spoiler:
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    I feel pretty honoured by you tagging me
    Ah yes it should be werden not wird, shouldda looked at the English translation x)

    I'm not sure about nach/zu as I always thought nach was just for countries and cities - prepositions are too confusing.

    Thanks for all of the other help you gave though and no problem about the tag
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    Comments are in bold - I hope these help...
    Spoiler:
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    I feel pretty honoured by you tagging me
    *Quotes you twice*

    I found something useful on what preposition to use for 'to':

    Normally, use nach for these.
    Continents, islands, countries, cities and towns

    Use in if you will end up inside a place or location
    Use auf if you will end up on something - Auf is also sometimes used for going to formal events or public places.
    Use an to describe motion to a precise spot, or to something that can be perceived as a horizontal or vertical boundary (something you would stand at or by in English)

    If in doubt, use zu!
    Zu can replace in if you need not emphasize that you are going inside, and must replace in if it would be absurd to speak of going inside--e.g. driving to a building, visiting a person.

    --

    So I think they're correct in using zu but I can't imagine 'back to' literally being 'zurück zu' in German. As for the Brighton one; I agree nach just sounds wrong with besuchen.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Ah yes it should be werden not wird, shouldda looked at the English translation x)

    I'm not sure about nach/zu as I always thought nach was just for countries and cities - prepositions are too confusing.

    Thanks for all of the other help you gave though and no problem about the tag
    Thank you ☺️
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    *Quotes you twice*

    I found something useful on what preposition to use for 'to':

    Normally, use nach for these.
    Continents, islands, countries, cities and towns

    Use in if you will end up inside a place or location
    Use auf if you will end up on something - Auf is also sometimes used for going to formal events or public places.
    Use an to describe motion to a precise spot, or to something that can be perceived as a horizontal or vertical boundary (something you would stand at or by in English)

    If in doubt, use zu!
    Zu can replace in if you need not emphasize that you are going inside, and must replace in if it would be absurd to speak of going inside--e.g. driving to a building, visiting a person.

    --

    So I think they're correct in using zu but I can't imagine 'back to' literally being 'zurück zu' in German. As for the Brighton one; I agree nach just sounds wrong with besuchen.
    I was just confused because you usually say fahren nach Hause when you say you're going home, so I assumed that it would be the same for if you said you'd be going to someone else's house :dontknow:




    According to this website: http://www.thegermanprofessor.com/zuhauseornachhause/

    Zu Hause is the same as at home (as in you're already in the house)
    Nach Hause means going home (you're moving in the direction towards home)

    I guess this would only count if the same applied when talking to someone else's house...

    But yeah, in other instances, I'll probably just stick to 'zu', because I don't seem to get prepositions :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    I was just confused because you usually say fahren nach Hause when you say you're going home, so I assumed that it would be the same for if you said you'd be going to someone else's house :dontknow:




    According to this website: http://www.thegermanprofessor.com/zuhauseornachhause/

    Zu Hause is the same as at home (as in you're already in the house)
    Nach Hause means going home (you're moving in the direction towards home)

    I guess this would only count if the same applied when talking to someone else's house...

    But yeah, in other instances, I'll probably just stick to 'zu', because I don't seem to get prepositions :getmecoat:
    Yeah I use zu Hause for "at home" so I was a tiny bit skeptical and the website you linked to does seem to suggest nach Hause is correct. Perhaps Hause is just an exception to the zu vs nach rule?

    So yes it does seem that nach is correct (after all of that du hast Recht ). This image can help you with some prepositions (you are the GREEN dot), but obviously quite a few aren't on there:



    and np OP
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    Yeah I use zu Hause for "at home" so I was a tiny bit skeptical and the website you linked to does seem to suggest nach Hause is correct. Perhaps Hause is just an exception to the zu vs nach rule?

    So yes it does seem that nach is correct (after all of that du hast Recht ). This image can help you with some prepositions (you are the GREEN dot), but obviously quite a few aren't on there:



    and np OP
    That poster looks so helpful! Thanks!

    By the way, I looked up more to do with when to say 'nach', and your version probably still sticks - when you say 'nach Hause' you're talking about home, and you don't exactly say 'I'm going to X's home', rather you say 'I'm going to X's house', so in the same way, you'd just stick to zu when talking about going to Leah's (was it Leah?) house.

    So actually, du hattest Recht von Anfang!
    Spoiler:
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    I must remember that nach Hause only works with my home...
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    That poster looks so helpful! Thanks!

    By the way, I looked up more to do with when to say 'nach', and your version probably still sticks - when you say 'nach Hause' you're talking about home, and you don't exactly say 'I'm going to X's home', rather you say 'I'm going to X's house', so in the same way, you'd just stick to zu when talking about going to Leah's (was it Leah?) house.

    So actually, du hattest Recht von Anfang!
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I must remember that nach Hause only works with my home...
    No problem

    I looked it up some more as well and I came to a different conclusion xD. I concluded that 'nach' is always used for Hause when you are talking about motion towards a home and 'zu' when you are at home. Here's the video I watched that summed it up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u52gQieDDQY

    So bin ich mir sicher, dass "nach" eigentlich richtig ist xD.
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    No problem

    I looked it up some more as well and I came to a different conclusion xD. I concluded that 'nach' is always used for Hause when you are talking about motion towards a home and 'zu' when you are at home. Here's the video I watched that summed it up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u52gQieDDQY

    So bin ich mir sicher, dass "nach" eigentlich richtig ist xD.
    https://www.google.de/?gws_rd=ssl#q=...deinem+haus%22

    https://www.google.de/?gws_rd=ssl#q=...deinem+haus%22

    Stuff comes up when I type 'Ich gehe zu deinem Haus', but not for 'Ich gehe nach deinem Haus', so shouldn't 'zu' be the correct one?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I think the examples that the video had would only work if no possessive pronouns were used like with 'Leah's house' :dontknow:
    Spoiler:
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    I don't know why I'm trying so hard to prove myself wrong... :getmecoat:
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    https://www.google.de/?gws_rd=ssl#q=...deinem+haus%22

    https://www.google.de/?gws_rd=ssl#q=...deinem+haus%22

    Stuff comes up when I type 'Ich gehe zu deinem Haus', but not for 'Ich gehe nach deinem Haus', so shouldn't 'zu' be the correct one?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I think the examples that the video had would only work if no possessive pronouns were used like with 'Leah's house' :dontknow:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I don't know why I'm trying so hard to prove myself wrong... :getmecoat:
    "Ich gehe nach Hause." I go home. (Here one is not speaking of "Haus" in the sense of "house", but of "home". One could e.g. also say: "I fly home to England." = "Ich fliege nach Hause nach England.")
    "Ich gehe zu deinem Haus." I go to your house.
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    https://www.google.de/?gws_rd=ssl#q=...deinem+haus%22

    https://www.google.de/?gws_rd=ssl#q=...deinem+haus%22

    Stuff comes up when I type 'Ich gehe zu deinem Haus', but not for 'Ich gehe nach deinem Haus', so shouldn't 'zu' be the correct one?
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I think the examples that the video had would only work if no possessive pronouns were used like with 'Leah's house' :dontknow:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I don't know why I'm trying so hard to prove myself wrong... :getmecoat:
    My gosh, I knew I hated prepositions but never this much. I did just come across something on the about site as well to maybe suggest it's zu not nach -

    Note that if you want to say "to my house/place" in German, you say zu mir (zu + dative pronoun) and the word Haus is not used at all!

    So by that logic we would say "zu Leahs"?? but then LEAH ISN'T A DATIVE WORD oh my god

    i have German tomorrow (well a mock speaking but hey) and I will remember to ask my teacher.
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    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    "Ich gehe nach Hause." I go home. (Here one is not speaking of "Haus" in the sense of "house", but of "home". One could e.g. also say: "I fly home to England." = "Ich fliege nach Hause nach England."
    "Ich gehe zu deinem Haus." I go to your house.
    So would Leahs House be "Ich gehe zu Leahs Hause"?
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    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    "Ich gehe nach Hause." I go home. (Here one is not speaking of "Haus" in the sense of "house", but of "home". One could e.g. also say: "I fly home to England." = "Ich fliege nach Hause nach England."
    "Ich gehe zu deinem Haus." I go to your house.
    That's what I found too, when searching up when to say nach Hause, so when saying 'on the trip back to Leah's house', should 'zu' be used because we're talking about the house of Leah?
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    (Original post by Inexorably)
    So would Leahs House be "Ich gehe zu Leahs Hause"?
    A German would probably say either "Ich gehe zu Leah." or "Ich gehe zu Leah nach Hause." (So he wants to say, that he goes to Leah's home.)

    In case he wants to say, that he goes to the house of Leah (which could also just mean, standing in front of the house, and means only with additional context, that that person intends to visit Leah! E.g. if you would describe to somebody, how he gets somewhere, you would use not home, but "Gehe zu Leahs Haus und biege dann links ab."): "Ich gehe zu Leahs Haus." (Haus is here Dativ. __> "Ich gehe zu dem Haus.")
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    (Original post by TheOtherSide.)
    That's what I found too, when searching up when to say nach Hause, so when saying 'on the trip back to Leah's house', should 'zu' be used because we're talking about the house of Leah?
    Yes. In case you are only talking about Leahs house like Leahs tree, you use zu.
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    (Original post by Nathanielle)
    Yes. In case you are only talking about Leahs house like Leahs tree, you use zu.
    Thank you!

    So after all that, you were correct, Inexorably :lol:
 
 
 
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