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    I really don't get this idea. Can somebody explain it in really simple terms? It's another language to me lmao and I'm struggling to memorise it.
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    Do you mean Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)?
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    I really don't get this idea. Can somebody explain it in really simple terms? It's another language to me lmao and I'm struggling to memorise it.
    Absorption spectra:

    >Hydrogen inhabits unexcited, ground state.
    >An electron in orbital around the hydrogen nucleus absorbs a quanta of energy from electromagnetic radiation and is raised to an excited state.
    >Using spectroscopy, an absorption spectrum (one with the continuous spectrum of visible light in the background) for this hydrogen sample would display a black line.
    >This black line corresponds to that quanta of energy absorbed or, to get the mark, corresponds to the specific frequency of radiation that is equal to the change in energy between the two energy levels through which the electron was raised (this is your deltaE=hv equation--stating this also gets a mark).

    You must also remember that there are a range of different possible transitions that this electron can make! (And that's why you get several lines instead of just one).

    Emission spectra:

    >Hydrogen inhabits an excited state (i.e. that electron we talked about is still hanging around in a higher energy level!)
    >Due to quantum electrodynamics [you don't need to know that ], this electron drops back down to, not necessarily a more stable energy level, but to a lower energy level: which is closer to the positive nucleus.
    >As it drops down, it releases a photon (or a specific frequency of visible radiation for the mark).
    >This specific frequency, again, is equal to the quanta of energy between the two energy levels in question.
    >Using spectroscopy, an emission spectrum (the one with the black background and coloured vertical lines) for this hydrogen sample would display a coloured vertical line.
    >Guess what? That vertical line corresponds to that exact frequency that was emitted through a photon!

    In summary:
    If electrons are moving up (because they absorbed energy), you get an absorption spectrum interruption (black line).
    If electrons are moving down (losing energy as they do so), you get an emission spectrum interruption (coloured line).

    Good luck!! )
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    I fink you meant emission spectra for the second one.
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    (Original post by Pigster)
    I fink you meant emission spectra for the second one.
    Oops thanks
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    Thank you so much!
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    (Original post by Marrow)
    Absorption spectra:

    >Hydrogen inhabits unexcited, ground state.
    >An electron in orbital around the hydrogen nucleus absorbs a quanta of energy from electromagnetic radiation and is raised to an excited state.
    >Using spectroscopy, an absorption spectrum (one with the continuous spectrum of visible light in the background) for this hydrogen sample would display a black line.
    >This black line corresponds to that quanta of energy absorbed or, to get the mark, corresponds to the specific frequency of radiation that is equal to the change in energy between the two energy levels through which the electron was raised (this is your deltaE=hv equation--stating this also gets a mark).

    You must also remember that there are a range of different possible transitions that this electron can make! (And that's why you get several lines instead of just one).

    Emission spectra:

    >Hydrogen inhabits an excited state (i.e. that electron we talked about is still hanging around in a higher energy level!)
    >Due to quantum electrodynamics [you don't need to know that ], this electron drops back down to, not necessarily a more stable energy level, but to a lower energy level: which is closer to the positive nucleus.
    >As it drops down, it releases a photon (or a specific frequency of visible radiation for the mark).
    >This specific frequency, again, is equal to the quanta of energy between the two energy levels in question.
    >Using spectroscopy, an emission spectrum (the one with the black background and coloured vertical lines) for this hydrogen sample would display a coloured vertical line.
    >Guess what? That vertical line corresponds to that exact frequency that was emitted through a photon!

    In summary:
    If electrons are moving up (because they absorbed energy), you get an absorption spectrum interruption (black line).
    If electrons are moving down (losing energy as they do so), you get an emission spectrum interruption (coloured line).

    Good luck!! )
    OMG I UNDERSTAND A THING. But really, thank you very much. It's much more clear now.
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    (Original post by AndrewKn0x)
    OMG I UNDERSTAND A THING. But really, thank you very much. It's much more clear now.
    Hah that's fine, good luck!
 
 
 
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