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    Hi,

    Sorry, I know this has probably been done a million times and is, to some degree, subjective, but I would appreciate anyone's contributions..

    I am planning on applying to read Modern History at Oxford, starting in 2005. My problem comes in deciding which college to apply to - striking the balance between competition and quality of teaching.

    I had planned to apply to St. Anne's but fear that I would be discrimnated against there as a private school student.

    Anyone got any advice?
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    I didn't apply for History, but I did apply for Hertford (one of the most state-school colleges) as a public school student. Nobody really thought it was an issue, it'll only be a problem if you make it one.

    St. Anne's seems nice, though. If you like it then go for it.
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    I thought I might be making too much of it. In the end it comes down to the question of why St. Anne's has a larger proportion of state school students - is it because it discriminates against private schoolers, or is it because state schoolers just apply there more than private schoolers?

    Anybody know?
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    I thought I might be making too much of it. In the end it comes down to the question of why St. Anne's has a larger proportion of state school students - is it because it discriminates against private schoolers, or is it because state schoolers just apply there more than private schoolers?

    Anybody know?
    Almost certainly because more state schoolers apply. You can get the figures off the Oxford site somewhere (for proportions of applicants to proportions of acceptances) but I forget where.
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    OK, thanks a lot, I'll have a look around.

    If anyone else has any other recommendations other than St. Anne's, please post..
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    OK, thanks a lot, I'll have a look around.

    If anyone else has any other recommendations other than St. Anne's, please post..
    What's important to you? Nowhere is going to be bad at teaching, so it's really down to your preferences.
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    Well in all honesty, rightly or wrongly, my first concern would be my chances of getting in.

    Politically speaking, I'd prefer somewhere with a somewhat leftist feel, as I find conservative/right-wing/nationalist/etc people to be somewhat vexing.
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    Oxf is more apathetic to that kind of thing than you might imagine
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    To what? Political alignment?
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    Well in all honesty, rightly or wrongly, my first concern would be my chances of getting in.

    Politically speaking, I'd prefer somewhere with a somewhat leftist feel, as I find conservative/right-wing/nationalist/etc people to be somewhat vexing.
    I though Balliol was supposed to be quite open/leftist? or am I making that up?
    What about Somerville? The only trouble with Somerville is that I think it is rather state-school oriented... but that shouldn't really stop you applying. St Annes is nice too, just go visit them and get a feel for what they're like.
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    To what? Political alignment?
    Yeah. Wadham is traditionally 'left', but there are a fair few in the 'dont really care' category. But i'd have to say, just go and visit a few open days, talk to the people, see which kind of atmosphere formal/informal high pressure/relaxed, sport/less sport etc suits you. Teaching isn't going to vary hugely, because largely, you go to other colleges to see specialists anyway. Go on the atmosphere of the place.
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    Right - Oriel
    Left - Balliol and Wadham.

    The rest are fairly central. It dosen't matter though, you get right-wingers at Wadham and left-wingers at Orial; I would say there are more important things to consider.
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    Thanks everyone.

    I wasn't massively worried about the political views of the people in the colleges, I was just worried about a scenario at interview such as unwittingly being at a right wing college, and coming down firmly in Carr's favour in the Elton/Carr debate - due to Carr being fairly close to being a Marxist
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    I was just worried about a scenario at interview such as unwittingly being at a right wing college, and coming down firmly in Carr's favour in the Elton/Carr debate - due to Carr being fairly close to being a Marxist
    a) If you think you're going to get rejected for arguing a point of view the tutor disagrees with, you've somewhat missed the point of the exercise - almost irrespective of what you say, tutors will question what you say, probably in some depth.

    b) I'm almost certain no-one wants to hear about the Elton/Carr debate. I believe it's getting on to being 40 years old, and most history tutors will have heard every conceivable angle of it millions of times. At one of the lectures at the history open day last year, one of the first questions the tutor asked was "any of you heard of this?" while holding up What Is History? As a number of very earnest looking girls stuck their hands up (while continuing to furiously take notes, obviously), he put it down dismissively, saying "what a boring book it is" and moved on.
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    That was just a possible scenario I used as an example off the top of my head. I was not commenting on the debate itself.

    However thanks for answering my question - the dose of arrogant ******y which it came with was also very much appreciated.
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    That was just a possible scenario I used as an example off the top of my head. I was not commenting on the debate itself.

    However thanks for answering my question - the dose of arrogant ******y which it came with was also very much appreciated.
    Easy, tiger. Just trying to be helpful.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Left - Balliol
    Baz ya big red commie.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    Easy, tiger. Just trying to be helpful.
    Just how I interpreted your post. I told you I was into Carr, didn't I?
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    (Original post by Tonight Matthew)
    Just how I interpreted your post. I told you I was into Carr, didn't I?
    There's nothing wrong as such with Carr, he certainly worked hard for his reputation. Unfortunately, his book has been a victim of its own success. If you genuinely know something about different Carr - really know and understand What Is History, or perhaps some of his other works, for example, tutors will give you credit for that. They're always impressed with passion for the subject and reading around; the main reason I suspect they don't like What Is History is that it's something that people who aren't passionate and don't read around to try to use to deceive tutors.
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    Sorry, my comment about being into Carr wasn't entirely serious. In all honesty, I've only actually just started getting into Historiography (surprised that, by the end of the lower sixth, my History teacher had not even mentioned it) but am looking forward to reading more and more about it. Any suggestions?

    And sorry for being a knob jockey earlier.
 
 
 
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