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    Medium-Rare.
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    (Original post by queen-bee)
    Mine needs to be proper cooked,I wonder how people manage to eat theirs with blood dripping
    I agree.
    I like mine really well done, cremated even.
    I dont get the barely cooked blood dripping thing either.
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    (Original post by Ablicious)
    Medium rare, not sure of the difference between each of those cuts but im sure google can help.

    I don't get how people can like steaks that re over-cooked/well done..... they're so tasteless and dry.
    It's a waste of a steak. Must like chewing old boots as well.
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    I always go for a sirloin or fillet, and I cook it until it's almost reduced to ash. Incinerated steak has this gorgeous burnt slightly metallic taste to it and it's brilliant for exercising. I like to think it makes my face look nicer because it gets my face muscles all in shape.
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    Medium rare smothered in garlic butter
    Usually go for fillet when someone else is paying and just a sirloin when I'm paying
    Partner has it blue. I really don't like it that way but each to their own.
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    Medium-rare. I don't need for it to be bleeding, but I want to be able to see where the jockey was hitting it.

    Filet-mignon has its advantages (i.e., fat content), but has intrinsically less flavor than cuts like the NY strip or ribeye. For that I'm more likely to add something besides salt and pepper.
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    Dust lightly with dried ginger, smear with minced garlic, and then squeeze a lime over the whole thing.
    Salt and pepper if desired.
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    Fun fact for everyone who doesn't like "undercooked" steak because of the blood: It's not blood.

    But yeah, I order and cook my steaks rare, but I don't mind if they come out erring on blue. Anything beyond medium rare is a tragic waste of cow- more cooking equals less water content, and that water is taking flavour and moisture with it.

    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    And do you think there is a difference in taste between rump/ribeye/fillet that is worth the variation in price?
    There is definitely a difference in taste, but it doesn't necessarily correspond to price- Fillet is known for being less flavourful than other cuts because as a muscle it does substantially less work, but this is also what gives it the tenderness it is prized for. My absolute favourite cuts are bavette/flank and hanger steak, which are full of flavour and are distinctly different in terms of texture and grain to conventional cuts, and become quite chewy if cooked beyond rare (which is how they should be cooked anyway). They're also dirt cheap because of this. Beyond that I prefer ribeye and rump to fillet or sirloin.
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    When it's a misteak.
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    I like Rump because it is cheap. Sirloin and Ribeye are tastier in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    Fun fact for everyone who doesn't like "undercooked" steak because of the blood: It's not blood.

    But yeah, I order and cook my steaks rare, but I don't mind if they come out erring on blue. Anything beyond medium rare is a tragic waste of cow- more cooking equals less water content, and that water is taking flavour and moisture with it.



    There is definitely a difference in taste, but it doesn't necessarily correspond to price- Fillet is known for being less flavourful than other cuts because as a muscle it does substantially less work, but this is also what gives it the tenderness it is prized for.
    I didn't really know what to call it, so I referred to it as blood.

    Surely as a muscle, it's leaner and less fat.
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    I didn't really know what to call it, so I referred to it as blood.

    Surely as a muscle, it's leaner and less fat.
    That's fair enough, but a lot of people are under the impression that it is literally blood and thus get put off eating steak with less cooking

    All steak is muscle, I just meant on the scale of muscles it gets very little work to do :yep:
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    That's fair enough, but a lot of people are under the impression that it is literally blood and thus get put off eating steak with less cooking

    All steak is muscle, I just meant on the scale of muscles it gets very little work to do :yep:
    Well pretty much all meat is muscle tissue, but I get what you mean. I didn't actually know that the less used the muscle, the tender the meat. I thought the opposite!

    Thanks for the post!
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    (Original post by MountKimbie)
    I didn't actually know that the less used the muscle, the tender the meat. I thought the opposite!
    Nope, less work equals more tender :yep: As muscles are exercised it essentially causes tears to form inside the muscle fibres, which are then filled in with new tissue during rest (this is the basic principle behind muscle growth). The more work a muscle does, the stronger it needs to be, which naturally means becoming tougher. Fillet steak comes from an area which does practically zero work in terms of bearing weight or enabling movement, which means the muscle remains as pretty much pristine tissue that's never gotten tougher.
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    (Original post by Gofre)
    Nope, less work equals more tender :yep: As muscles are exercised it essentially causes tears to form inside the muscle fibres, which are then filled in with new tissue during rest (this is the basic principle behind muscle growth). The more work a muscle does, the stronger it needs to be, which naturally means becoming tougher. Fillet steak comes from an area which does practically zero work in terms of bearing weight or enabling movement, which means the muscle remains as pretty much pristine tissue that's never gotten tougher.
    Hypertrophy :sexface:

    That makes perfect sense.
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    I've no idea tbh, I say "friend" but he's just a randomguy from the gym, I don't know much about him but we have a quick natter in the changing rooms if we bump into each other.

    Yeah it was at a BBQ, they were tikka chicken on skewers and there were loads of them on a platter in the kitchen. I ate about 5 of them before the girl who's house it was came in and was like "NO what are you doing, I was gonna cook those in a minute, they're raw!!!" :rofl: I thought I was gonna be seriously ill at some point in the next 12 hours but I was totally fine. They were so nice though :lol:
    Hell naw.

    Chicken always has to be well done for me, but obviously needs a lot of moisture in the middle.
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    Typically, medium-rare. Occasionally medium.
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    medium well done.
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    Rare normally but I need to eat well done for now

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    Cooked
 
 
 
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